Can You Help Indigenous Communities?

For many decades, indigenous people all over the world have been facing immense challenges that pose threats to their lives, to their experience as guardians of global biodiversity, and to their knowledge of sustainable management of food systems and healthy landscapes. During the last years, the coronavirus situation pointed out that without indigenous people cannot be sustainable development. Indigenous people are referred to in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development under:
SDG 2 on Zero Hunger
Target 2.3 By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists, and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources, and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment.

SDG 4 on Quality Education
Target 4.5 By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, and children in vulnerable situations.

At the same time, the International Labor Organization (ILO) considers the practices and traditional knowledge of indigenous and tribal people essential for achieving sustainable development. Yet, despite their important role, they remain disadvantaged. Data from the World Bank (WB) confirm that there are approximately 476 million indigenous people living in over 90 countries. Based on these numbers, they make up over six percent of the world’s population. However, they account for 15 percent of the people living in extreme poverty. Besides this, they face difficulties regarding access to education, healthcare, employment, basic services, justice, and decision-making. According to the United Nations, globally, 47 percent of all indigenous peoples in employment have no education, compared to 17 percent of their non-indigenous counterparts. This gap is even wider for women.

Some of the world’s best-protected forest landscapes are lands of indigenous people and managed by indigenous people.
A publication from nature.com shows that Indigenous Peoples manage or have tenure rights over at least 38 million km2 in 87 countries or politically distinct areas on all inhabited continents. This represents over a quarter of the world’s land surface.
The role of indigenous people in landscape management and their knowledge are essential to meeting global conservation goals. They also speak over 7,000 languages and represent 5,000 different cultures.
Given their conditions, indigenous people are more vulnerable to climate change, human activity such as mining and agriculture, and disease outbreaks such as the coronavirus pandemic.

The difficult situation that indigenous people are going through due to the pandemic outbreak and all the other issues mentioned above pose a threat to their health and thus to their vital knowledge on how to adapt and reduce the risks of climate change. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown the capability of indigenous and tribal people to adapt.
On August 9th, the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, the UN while raising awareness on the needs of indigenous communities, pointed out that their challenges are our challenges. Hence everyone can help indigenous people with innovative solutions that help these communities show resilience. Remember that indigenous knowledge offers innovative solutions that can help to address major issues such as biodiversity loss and climate change.
Do you know more about indigenous communities, their problems, and the ability to respond and adapt? Share your knowledge in the comments below, or join the Citizen Entrepreneurship Competition if you have an innovative idea or project. Meanwhile, you can join the network of young and adult entrepreneurs and take entrepreneurship online training. 

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56 Comments

  1. elfs August zweitousendundzwanzig

    Halo campus members

    Guten tag

    Based on this article of today Can You Help Indigenous Communities?

    SDG 4 on Quality Education
    Target 4.5 By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, and children in vulnerable situations.

    This place strike a cord because in the book of Lynne Twist titled Soul of Money,
    a californian, i urges all to read about this indigenous people how they live a live of biodiversity and also the power of education should be on the condor and the other intuition in order to balance.

    The whites have wisdom while the black have intuition

  2. How we budding entrepreneurs and social and serial entrepreneurs help this indigenous people globally

    mein opinion ist

    Indigenous Peoples are culturally distinct societies and communities. The land on which they live and the natural resources on which they depend are inextricably linked to their identities, cultures, livelihoods, as well as their physical and spiritual well-being.

    There are approximately 476 million Indigenous Peoples worldwide, in over 90 countries. Although they make up over 6 percent of the global population, they account for about 15 percent of the extreme poor. Indigenous Peoples’ life expectancy is up to 20 years lower than the life expectancy of non-indigenous people worldwide.

    Indigenous Peoples often face impediments to their access to natural resources, basic services, the formal economy, and justice, as well as their participation in decision making. This legacy of inequality and exclusion has made indigenous communities more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and natural hazards, including to disease outbreaks such as COVID-19. Vulnerabilities to the pandemic are exacerbated with the lack of access to national health systems, food insecurity due to shutting down of markets, and mobility restrictions.

    Indigenous Peoples in voluntary isolation or extremely remote areas, such as the Amazon are at very high risk to the novel coronavirus, as pathogens have historically been one of the most powerful factors in decimating Indigenous Peoples. Many indigenous communities have traditional practices of lockdowns and isolation to protect themselves from diseases, and these need to be respected.

    While Indigenous Peoples own, occupy, or use a quarter of the world’s surface area, they safeguard 80 percent of the world’s remaining biodiversity. They hold vital ancestral knowledge and expertise on how to adapt, mitigate, and reduce climate and disaster risks. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is an opportunity to work through the traditional authorities of Indigenous Peoples to provide accurate information on disease prevention, distribute protective gear and hygiene supplies, and support livelihoods and recovery in ways that are appropriate to Indigenous People’s needs and cultures.

    Much of the land occupied by Indigenous Peoples is under indigenous customary ownership, and yet many governments recognize only a fraction of this land as formally or legally belonging to Indigenous Peoples. Insecure land tenure is a driver of conflict, environmental degradation, and weak economic and social development. This threatens cultural survival and vital knowledge systems – both of which contribute to ecological integrity, biodiversity and environmental health upon which we all depend.

    Improving security of land tenure, strengthening governance, and supporting indigenous systems for resilience and livelihoods are critical to reduce the multidimensional aspects of poverty they face while contributing to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The World Bank works with Indigenous Peoples to enhance all of these areas while working with governments to ensure that broader development programs reflect the voices and aspirations of Indigenous Peoples.

    Over the last 20 years, Indigenous Peoples’ rights have been increasingly recognized through the adoption of international instruments and mechanisms, such as the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in 2007, the American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2016, 23 ratifications of the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention from 1991, the establishment of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII), the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (EMRIP), and the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNSR).

    Last Updated: Sep 24, 2019

    Let us read and reflect and refine our ideas and projects for it

  3. Anonymous

    11.08.2020 · Reply

    Did you know?
    More than 86% of indigenous peoples globally work in the informal economy, compared to 66% for their non-indigenous counterparts

  4. Anonymous

    11.08.2020 · Reply

    Indigenous peoples are nearly three times as likely to be living in extreme poverty compared to their non-indigenous counterparts.

  5. Anonymous

    11.08.2020 · Reply

    Globally, 47% of all indigenous peoples in employment have no education, compared to 17% of their non-indigenous counterparts. This gap is even wider for women.

  6. Indigenous communities already face a host of challenges, and the unfortunate present reality is that the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic are worsening these challenges further still.

  7. Indigenous communities already experience poor access to healthcare, significantly higher rates of diseases, lack of access to essential services, sanitation, and other key preventive measures, such as clean water, soap, disinfectant, etc. Likewise, most nearby local medical facilities are often under-equipped and under-staffed. Even when indigenous peoples can access healthcare services, they can face stigma and discrimination. A key factor is to ensure services and facilities are provided in indigenous languages, as appropriate to the specific situation of Indigenous peoples.

  8. Indigenous peoples’ traditional lifestyles are a source of their resiliency and can also pose a threat at this time in preventing the spread of the virus.  For example, most indigenous communities regularly organize large traditional gatherings to mark special events e.g. harvests, coming of age ceremonies, etc. Some indigenous communities also live in multi-generational housing, which puts Indigenous peoples and their families, especially the Elders, at risk.

    Furthermore, indigenous peoples already face food insecurity as a result of the loss of their traditional lands and territories or even climate change effects. They also confront even graver challenges accessing food. With the loss of their traditional livelihoods, which are often land-based, many indigenous peoples, who work in traditional occupations and subsistence economies or in the informal sector, will be adversely affected by the pandemic. The situation of indigenous women, who are often the main providers of food and nutrition to their families, is even graver.

    In order to raise awareness of the needs of indigenous peoples, every 9 August commemorates the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. Especially now, they need us. Especially now, we need the tradicional knowledge, voices and wisdom of indigenous peoples.

  9. Anonymous

    11.08.2020 · Reply

    While the exact origins of COVID-19 have not yet been confirmed, the link between environmental damage and pandemics is well known to leading research organizations.

  10. Anonymous

    11.08.2020 · Reply

    But there is yet another group of experts, who have been worrying about the threat of a pandemic even before COVID-19: indigenous peoples. Thanks to their traditional knowledge and their relationship with the natural world, they have long known that the degradation of the environment has the potential to unleash disease.

  11. Anonymous

    11.08.2020 · Reply

    As we fight against the spread of the pandemic, it is more important than ever to safeguard indigenous peoples and their knowledge. Their territories are home to 80% of the world’s biodiversity and they can teach us much about how to rebalance our relationship with nature and reduce the risk of future pandemics.

    Indigenous peoples are seeking their own solutions to this pandemic. They are taking action and using traditional knowledge and practices such as voluntary isolation, and sealing off their territories, as well as preventive measures.

    Once again they have shown their capability to adapt. This year’s theme is COVID-19 and indigenous peoples’ resilience and a virtual event will feature a panel discussion on the innovative ways indigenous peoples continue demonstrating resilience and strength in the face of the pandemic, while confronting grave threats to their survival. Find more information about the 2020 Commemoration and how to participate here.

  12. Do you know?
    SDG 2 ON ZERO HUNGER.

    Target 2.3 By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources, and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment.
    Campus members the above article is very important to read.

  13. Can you help indigenous communities? Yes l can; yes we can. According to Guenther Faltin and his inspirers, everyone is liable to be entrepreneurs because we all have that mode of creativity. Truly truly l say to you! If a man knows the capacity of his brain, the initial, the initiative, the endpoint, his limit and excellent value of his brain, he would have a highly changed environment. Now let’s change “man” to people. What am l talking about? Our environment will be radically developed, and that makes a sustainable world. Fact!

  14. Anonymous

    11.08.2020 · Reply

    The funny fact is that some of this indigenous communities are historical and have nothing to write home about development in the contemporary. According to gregoryanayochukwu’s comment, this necessary part:
    If a man knows the capacity of his brain, the initial, the initiative, the endpoint, his limit and excellent value of his brain, he would have a highly changed environment. Now let’s change “man” to people. What am l talking about? Our environment will be radically developed, and that makes a sustainable world. Fact!

  15. twelf august,

    halo campus members

    Reflect on this today

    If a man knows the capacity of his brain, the initial, the initiative, the endpoint, his limit and excellent value of his brain, he would have a highly changed environment. Now let’s change “man” to people. What am l talking about? Our environment will be radically developed, and that makes a sustainable world. Fact!

  16. Guten Tag to All

    Today I want us to consider the way we can all collectively help the indigenous people is to make sure we bridge and bring a hub between that is inextricably intertwined between the people of the Eagle and the people of Condor, that is WISDOM and INTUITION

    Please cast your comments and votes to Germany dovetail Nigeria at this veracious link today and this week Gut danke https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/

  17. Can you help indigenous communities? Yes l can; yes we can. According to Guenther Faltin and his inspirers, everyone is liable to be entrepreneurs because we all have that mode of creativity. Truly truly l say to you! If a man knows the capacity of his brain, the initial, the initiative, the endpoint, his limit and excellent value of his brain, he would have a highly changed environment. Now let’s change “man” to people. What am l talking about? Our environment will be radically developed, and that makes a sustainable world. Fact!

    Fact like this is ideal and I agree with Gregory’s comment

    Please cast your comments and votes to Germany dovetail Nigeria at this veracious link today and this week Gut danke https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/

  18. “SDG 4 on Quality Education
    Target 4.5 By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, and children in vulnerable situations”

    My idea Eduheal tackles the above need of indigenous people, we seek to provide education opportunities to all kinds of people indigenous or not, male and female, in conflict or not, in crisi or not.

    I equally encourage campus members espercially those with ideas in agriculture to see how they can include indigenous people in their solutions even it involves providing information to them on best agricultural practices.

    I hope all seek to help indigenous people today.
    Thank you campus administrator for sharing.

  19. Can You Help Indigenous Communities? Yes.

    For many decades, indigenous people all over the world have been facing huge challenges that pose threats to their lives, to their experience as guardians of global biodiversity, and to their knowledge of sustainable management of food systems and healthy landscapes.

    Campus members can we help too?

  20. Do you know?

    Everyone can help indigenous people with innovative solutions that help these communities show resilience. Remember that indigenous knowledge offers innovative solutions that can help to address major issues such as biodiversity loss and climate change.

  21. Anonymous

    12.08.2020 · Reply

    Indigenous Peoples are culturally distinct societies and communities. The land on which they live and the natural resources on which they depend are inextricably linked to their identities, cultures, livelihoods, as well as their physical and spiritual well-being.

  22. Anonymous

    12.08.2020 · Reply

    There are approximately 476 million Indigenous Peoples worldwide, in over 90 countries. Although they make up over 6 percent of the global population, they account for about 15 percent of the extreme poor. Indigenous Peoples’ life expectancy is up to 20 years lower than the life expectancy of non-indigenous people worldwide.

  23. Anonymous

    12.08.2020 · Reply

    Indigenous Peoples often face impediments to their access to natural resources, basic services, the formal economy, and justice, as well as their participation in decision making. This legacy of inequality and exclusion has made indigenous communities more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and natural hazards, including to disease outbreaks such as COVID-19. Vulnerabilities to the pandemic are exacerbated with the lack of access to national health systems, food insecurity due to shutting down of markets, and mobility restrictions.

  24. Indigenous Peoples in voluntary isolation or extremely remote areas, such as the Amazon are at very high risk to the novel coronavirus, as pathogens have historically been one of the most powerful factors in decimating Indigenous Peoples.

    .

  25. Many indigenous communities have traditional practices of lockdowns and isolation to protect themselves from diseases, and these need to be respected.

  26. While Indigenous Peoples own, occupy, or use a quarter of the world’s surface area, they safeguard 80 percent of the world’s remaining biodiversity. They hold vital ancestral knowledge and expertise on how to adapt, mitigate, and reduce climate and disaster risks. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is an opportunity to work through the traditional authorities of Indigenous Peoples to provide accurate information on disease prevention, distribute protective gear and hygiene supplies, and support livelihoods and recovery in ways that are appropriate to Indigenous People’s needs and cultures

  27. Anonymous

    12.08.2020 · Reply

    Much of the land occupied by Indigenous Peoples is under indigenous customary ownership, and yet many governments recognize only a fraction of this land as formally or legally belonging to Indigenous Peoples.
    .

  28. Anonymous

    12.08.2020 · Reply

    Insecure land tenure is a driver of conflict, environmental degradation, and weak economic and social development. This threatens cultural survival and vital knowledge systems – both of which contribute to ecological integrity, biodiversity and environmental health upon which we all depend.

  29. Anonymous

    12.08.2020 · Reply

    Improving security of land tenure, strengthening governance, and supporting indigenous systems for resilience and livelihoods are critical to reduce the multidimensional aspects of poverty they face while contributing to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The World Bank works with Indigenous Peoples to enhance all of these areas while working with governments to ensure that broader development programs reflect the voices and aspirations of Indigenous Peoples

  30. On August 9th, the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, the UN while raising awareness on the needs of indigenous communities, pointed out that their challenges are our challenges. Hence everyone can help indigenous people with innovative solutions that help these communities show resilience. Remember that indigenous knowledge offers innovative solutions that can help to address major issues such as biodiversity loss and climate change. Campus members, what can you say about this?

  31. Anonymous

    12.08.2020 · Reply

    Hey members over there! Guess what! There are 17 sustainable goals (SDGs), and each SDG has targets.
    So in brevity, the goals for a sustainable world is very wide and integral.

  32. Guten Tag to All

    I think this gregory words are not just unconventional,

    Hey members over there! Guess what! There are 17 sustainable goals (SDGs), and each SDG has targets.
    So in brevity, the goals for a sustainable world is very wide and integral.

    But i want to educate all today that the 17 sustainable goals are intertwined to each, so we contestants must learn how to question endlessly, isn’t it? or are we mavericks at all?

    Please cast your comments and votes to Germany dovetail Nigeria at this veracious link today and this week Gut danke https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/

  33. THE PROPHECY OF THE EAGLE AND THE CONDOR

    In continuing work with Achuar indigenous peoples, they have told us that our alliance with them is the fulfillment of a long told indigenous prophecy of collaboration for survival, called the Prophecy of the Eagle and elders across the years, South American shamans and elders across the continent have told that at the beginning of the fifth Pachakuri (a Pachakuti is a cycle of fiver hundred years) – the era we live in today – a reunion would come to pass between the long separated “people of the Eagle” and “people of the Condor.”

    Please cast your comments and votes to Germany dovetail Nigeria at this veracious link today and this week Gut danke https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/

    Auf Wiedersehen to all co contestants 2020

  34. “For many decades, indigenous people all over the world have been facing huge challenges that pose threats to their lives, to their experience as guardians of global biodiversity, and to their knowledge of sustainable management of food systems and healthy landscapes. Now, more than ever, the coronavirus situation pointed out that without indigenous people cannot sustainable development. Indigenous people are referred to in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development under”

    Campus members, the above statement have indeed put indegenous people in a desperate condition. Going with this article, then the indigenous needs our collective responsibility to them. I therefore encourgae every one of us to devise means in all our little corners to support indigenous people around us. We riseby lifting others. Our indigeneous people needds our lifeting today and henceforth.

  35. Anonymous

    13.08.2020 · Reply

    A spatial overview of the global importance of Indigenous lands for conservation.

    Abstract
    Understanding the scale, location and nature conservation values of the lands over which Indigenous Peoples exercise traditional rights is central to implementation of several global conservation and climate agreements. However, spatial information on Indigenous lands has never been aggregated globally.

  36. Anonymous

    13.08.2020 · Reply

    Here, using publicly available geospatial resources, we show that Indigenous Peoples manage or have tenure rights over at least ~38 million km2 in 87 countries or politically distinct areas on all inhabited continents. This represents over a quarter of the world’s land surface, and intersects about 40% of all terrestrial protected areas and ecologically intact landscapes (for example, boreal and tropical primary forests, savannas and marshes). Our results add to growing evidence that recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ rights to land, benefit sharing and institutions is essential to meeting local and global conservation goals.

  37. Anonymous

    13.08.2020 · Reply

    The geospatial analysis presented here indicates that collaborative partnerships involving conservation practitioners, Indigenous Peoples and governments would yield significant benefits for conservation of ecologically valuable landscapes, ecosystems and genes for future generations.

  38. Improving security of land tenure, strengthening governance, and supporting indigenous systems for resilience and livelihoods are critical to reduce the multidimensional aspects of poverty they face while contributing to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The World Bank works with Indigenous Peoples to enhance all of these areas while working with governments to ensure that broader development programs reflect the voices and aspirations of Indigenous Peoples.

    Please support my comment

  39. This legacy of inequality and exclusion has made indigenous communities more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and natural hazards, including to disease outbreaks such as COVID-19. Vulnerabilities to the pandemic are exacerbated with the lack of access to national health systems, food insecurity due to shutting down of markets, and mobility restrictions.

    Indigenous Peoples in voluntary isolation or extremely remote areas, such as the Amazon are at very high risk to the novel coronavirus, as pathogens have historically been one of the most powerful factors in decimating Indigenous Peoples. Many indigenous communities have traditional practices of lockdowns and isolation to protect themselves from diseases, and these need to be respected.

  40. Sustainable landscaping sounds like a hobby or a recreational activity you can do in your backyard, especially during a lockdown. Yet, it goes far beyond building your garden in a better way.

  41. To understand this, let’s start with your yard, balcony, or terrace. Even the tiniest apartment can have a small sustainable garden. They come with a lot of benefits. Plants beautify the space where you live, and if you’re a city dweller, they keep you connected with nature. You want to enjoy those benefits but at the same time spend less time working or taking care of your green area.
    Find the plants that will thrive in the local environment or native plants and trees. They are used to the local level of rainfall and already have created immunity against local pests and diseases.

  42. Identify invasive plants. Usually, those are non-native plants or alien species and are considered a threat to native species. Invasive plants grow too fast and spread quickly, disrupt local ecosystems, and even cause biodiversity loss.
    Harvest rainwater and make homemade compost fertilizer.

  43. One way of promoting a sustainable world is to change the its indigenous, primitive and mundane practice to a developed, refined and structured culture of the people. How about that guys? It starts from you. Change!

  44. Anonymous

    13.08.2020 · Reply

    Use eco-friendly materials. For example, you have seen vertical or hanging gardens also known as living walls that have been a growing trend during recent years. Although they can look pretty expensive, you can create your indoor living wall by using pots made of recycled materials or get creative with bottles or fabrics. The important part is to pick plants that will thrive in small pots and find the right position depending on sunlight.

  45. Anonymous

    13.08.2020 · Reply

    It takes a little planning and creativity to create not only a thriving garden but to turn it into a carbon sink and give a little help to combat climate change.

    All these ideas on sustainable landscaping can be applied to local parks or natural areas in your community. Sustainable landscaping helps to restore degraded land and water ecosystems, to prevent biodiversity loss, and to help against climate change. Speaking of climate protection, different studies confirm that some of the world’s best-protected forest landscapes are lands of indigenous people and managed by indigenous people.

  46. Anonymous

    13.08.2020 · Reply

    A publication from nature.com shows that Indigenous Peoples manage or have tenure rights over at least 38 million km2 in 87 countries or politically distinct areas on all inhabited continents. This represents over a quarter of the world’s land surface.
    The role of indigenous people in landscape management and their knowledge are essential to meeting global conservation goals.

  47. Anonymous

    13.08.2020 · Reply

    Question: Can you help indigenous communities?
    Answer: Yes l can; as a matter of fact, we can.
    Question: How can that be done?
    Answer: By achieving the 17 sustainable goals and their targets.

  48. Did we know that the prophecy story relates that in the beginning all the earth’s people were one, but long ago they divided into two groups and each followed a different path of development. The people of the Eagle were highly scientific and intellectual. The people o fthe Condor were highly attuned to nature and the intuitive realm.

    Check The Soul of Money by Lynne Twist

    Please cast your comments and votes to Germany dovetail Nigeria at this veracious link today and this week Gut danke https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/

    Auf Wiedersehen to all co contestants 2020

  49. I agree with this Gregory’s comment here

    Question: Can you help indigenous communities?
    Answer: Yes l can; as a matter of fact, we can.
    Question: How can that be done?
    Answer: By achieving the 17 sustainable goals and their targets.

  50. Much of the land occupied by Indigenous Peoples is under indigenous customary ownership, and yet many governments recognize only a fraction of this land as formally or legally belonging to Indigenous Peoples. Insecure land tenure is a driver of conflict, environmental degradation, and weak economic and social development. This threatens cultural survival and vital knowledge systems – both of which contribute to ecological integrity, biodiversity and environmental health upon which we all depend

  51. It all began with the industrial revolution. As factories began popping up in the late 1800s, they left a noticeable imprint on the land and air around them. Huge smoke stacks billowed waste into the air, and pollution belched into streams and lakes, killing fish. With no laws in place to stop them, their emissions quickly escalated.

    Campus members l us to read the New Blog or Article above.

  52. In other parts of the world, things were changing as well. In the United States, call for the first protected spaces, called “National Parks” were beginning, starting with a location known as Yosemite. Naturalists such as Emerson and Thoreau contributed to the creation of these parks, by romanticizing the wilderness, and making the average person want to protect these spaces.

  53. “SDG 2 on Zero Hunger
    Target 2.3 By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources, and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment.”

    Thank you so much, we have head your call to action.

    Chicken 4All Ltd.

    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17279/

  54. Joseph Bahenda

    23.08.2020 · Reply

    “Indigenous people are referred to in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development under:
    SDG 2 on Zero Hunger
    Target 2.3 By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources, and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment.”

  55. We all are addicted to reaching objectives that make us feel good. If the same logic is applied to a greater extent, let’s say collectively, we would be addicted to reaching goals that make everyone feel good. Those goals that would make societies more just and equitable are already well-defined in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Achieving the 17 goals sounds like something that can be attained only when people come together in big numbers. However such big movements, usually are fueled by individuals that take action at different levels. The pledge of the 2030 Agenda to leave no one behind also implies that everyone can help to make a change. While no specific skill sets are needed to get started with individual actions that would support progress towards achieving the SDGs, new skills would help to do it in smarter and more practical ways.

    If we all comply with this excerpt of the article, I think we will make a good sustainable future for all

  56. Very interesting article, I did not know much of the data provided. We need more disclosure.

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