Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

When social distancing becomes the norm, gaps in education grow wider. Before the COVID-19 outbreak, educators, researchers, and parents would often mention the summer learning loss. The term stands for an educational phenomenon where children and teens lose some of the knowledge they acquired during the previous year. Another point researchers agreed about was that inequalities in children’s lives would impact their summer learning loss. This means that those living in lower socio-economic conditions would experience a harsher impact on their

knowledge during the time away from school. At the same, the impact would be bigger for children and students with different disabilities as they have greater needs for ongoing learning. Otherwise, progress can be lost.
Children tend to experience more knowledge loss in subjects such as mathematics. It’s common for children and students to come across books and reading materials during their summer vacation. However, it is less likely to come across some math problems unless the children are specifically looking for that type of content or books. Moreover, people living in poor or disadvantaged areas don’t have the same access to summer courses or learning programs.

Based on these facts, experts say that the level of knowledge loss during 2020 due to school closures can be higher. Al children especially disadvantaged children and those with special needs are falling behind every day they’re out of school or can’t access online education.

Innovative solutions from around the world

In this case, innovation doesn’t mean cutting edge technology. It stands for simple practical solutions that people use to address a major concern.
Here, another major gap comes to attention. The digital gap. The transition from school to online learning was abrupt and numerous countries and their educational systems were unprepared. Many have still not managed to come up with proper inclusive strategies. However, as issues vary from one country to another, so do solutions that guarantee a higher level of inclusiveness. For example, various countries where the rate of the internet is too low put school on TV. This is a good solution for millions of children in those countries that won’t re-open schools again in 2020. The TV is more useful when it comes to subjects such as mathematics as children can have visual access to what the teacher is writing on the blackboard. The radio would be more apt for subjects such as art, literature, or history.

Loudspeakers for teachers
In Indian villages, children sitting in designated social distancing spots have learned through loudspeakers. Recorded lessons were put on loudspeakers and were widely welcomed by parents and children in rural villages. Kids in such remote areas had no opportunity to get lessons since when the school closed.

On the other hand, countries like Kenya took a different approach. They canceled the academic year and will start it over again.
“The decision to scrap the academic year, taken after month-long debate, was made not just to protect teachers and students from the coronavirus, but also to address glaring issues of inequality that arose when school was suspended in March,” the NYT quoted George Magoha, the education secretary as saying.

How has education been affected in your country? Are schools going to reopen? Can you think about an inclusive solution that contributes to SDG 4 and provides access to education to those who need it most? Join the 2020 Citizen Entrepreneurship Competition.

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288 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    About loud speakers

    Children in India have been learning through loudspeakers, in an initiative that aims to reach 1,000 students who have been denied formal classes since schools have shut.

  2. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    The children sing songs and answer questions, speaking of the loudspeaker as ‘Speaker Brother’ or ‘Speaker Sister’.
    Response to the programme has been encouraging thus far, in a region where connectivity issues make remote learning difficult.

  3. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    One overcast morning in a farming village in hilly western India, a group of schoolchildren sat on the mud floor of a wooden shed for their first class in months.

  4. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    There was no teacher, just a voice from a loudspeaker.

  5. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    The recorded lessons form part of an initiative by an Indian non-profit spread over six villages that aims to reach 1,000 students denied formal classes since the coronavirus pandemic forced schools to close four months ago.

  6. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    The children sang rhymes and answered questions, with some of them speaking of the loudspeaker as ‘Speaker Brother’ or ‘Speaker Sister’.

  7. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    “I love studying with Speaker Brother,” said Jyoti, a gleeful 11-year-old girl who attended one session.

  8. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    Reuters followed the volunteers last week as they carried the loudspeaker through villages in the Indian state of Maharashtra where children awaiting its arrival had gathered at designated, socially-distanced spots.

  9. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    “We wondered if children and their parents would accept a loudspeaker as their teacher,” said Shraddha Shringarpure, head of the Diganta Swaraj Foundation, which has done development work for more than a decade among tribal villages in the region.

  10. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    A point researchers agreed about was that inequalities in children’s lives would impact their summer learning loss. This means that those living in lower socio-economic conditions would experience a harsher impact on their knowledge during the time away from school

  11. In addition to juliusanayochukwu’s comment, the response to the programme, called ‘Bolki Shaala’ or ‘Spoken School’ in the state language of Marathi, has been encouraging, Shringarpure added.

  12. It reaches children who are usually the first in their families to go to school, with content covering part of the school curriculum, as well as social skills and English language lessons.

  13. “These kids have no guidance from their family, they are on their own,” Shringarpure said.

  14. While many children in cities have been able to attend classes online, those in places like Dandwal, where telecom networks are poor and power supply is often erratic, have gone months without opening schoolbooks.

  15. Parents like Sangeeta Yele, who hope for better lives for their children, are pushing them to attend the mobile classes.

  16. “As the school is closed, my son used to wander in the forests,” said Yele.

  17. ‘Bolki Shaala’ has reached our village and now my son has started studying. I am happy. It gives me happiness that my son can now sing songs and narrate stories.

  18. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    Children tend to experience more knowledge loss in subjects such as mathematics.

  19. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    It’s common for children and students to come across books and reading materials during their summer vacation.

  20. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    However, it is less likely to come across some math problems unless the children are specifically looking for that type of content or books.

  21. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    Moreover, people living in poor or disadvantaged areas don’t have the same access to summer courses or learning programs.

  22. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    Based on these facts, experts say that the level of knowledge loss during 2020 due to school closures can be higher.

  23. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    Al children especially disadvantaged children and those with special needs are falling behind every day they’re out of school or can’t access online education.

  24. One way to bridge the gap is dicovering potential in what already exists. Endorsing the MSMEs as well.

  25. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    I urge you all members to learn from this blog.

  26. About loud speakers

    Children in India have been learning through loudspeakers, in an initiative that aims to reach 1,000 students who have been denied formal classes since schools have shut.
    this is right

    i agree with it

  27. When social distancing becomes the norm, gaps in education grow wider. Before the COVID-19 outbreak, educators, researchers, and parents would often mention the summer learning loss. The term stands for an educational phenomenon where children and teens lose some of the knowledge they acquired during the previous year. Another point researchers agreed about was that inequalities in children’s lives would impact their summer learning loss. This means that those living in lower socio-economic conditions would experience a harsher impact on their

    knowledge during the time away from school. At the same, the impact would be bigger for children and students with different disabilities as they have greater needs for ongoing learning. Otherwise, progress can be lost.
    Children tend to experience more knowledge loss in subjects such as mathematics. It’s common for children and students to come across books and reading materials during their summer vacation. However, it is less likely to come across some math problems unless the children are specifically looking for that type of content or books. Moreover, people living in poor or disadvantaged areas don’t have the same access to summer courses or learning programs.

    This article is imperative for all contestants and campus team to resonate on ti, did we agree?

  28. Discover potential in what exists already

    View video
    Read lesson
    Exercises
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    Let us recheck this point in online training

  29. Let us reasearch on this

    Mexico’s solution to the Covid-19 educational crisis: Put school on television

    By Matt Rivers, Karol Suarez and Natalie Gallón, CNN

    Updated 2036 GMT (0436 HKT) August 27, 2020
    At the Benito Juárez elementary school in the community of Ahuelicán at Guerrero state, Mexico, cleaning days are organized by parents while they wait for classes to resume.

  30. The Jiménez family and friends at home.
    The great educational dilemma
    Mexico’s government won’t allow in-person classes this year, which means Mexico’s 30 million students will all be forced to learn remotely.
    Officials say the coronavirus pandemic — which has claimed roughly 60,000 lives amid more than 550,000 confirmed cases — is still too dangerous to allow kids back in the classroom.
    Protests across Latin America reflect a toxic cocktail of pandemic and recession
    Protests across Latin America reflect a toxic cocktail of pandemic and recession
    Remote learning is difficult even in developed countries. But in places like Mexico, taking that English or math class online isn’t so easy — only 56% of households have access to the internet, according to government statistics.
    So if the law requires all Mexican kids to be offered a public education, the government has decided the best way to do that is over the airwaves, with 93% of households having a television.
    Lights, camera … classes
    Inside a brightly lit studio at Mexico City TV station Channel 11 last week, fifth grade teacher Omar Morales squinted as a young man with bright purple hair applied makeup to his face.
    “Ok, this is your floor director,” a producer told him. “She is your eyes and ears out here, listen to what she tells you, look at the camera she tells you to look at and you’ll be fine.”
    This time last year, Morales was just a public school teacher setting up his classroom, getting ready to hug his kids on their first day of school.
    Now, part actor, part teacher, he practiced delivering a lesson plan about the elements of sound that will eventually be watched by millions.
    “It’s challenging,” he says modestly. “It’s no longer 40 kids in a class where I know their names, passions, their favorite games. Here, I’m locked in a set, but I know there’s millions of kids out there who still need that knowledge.”
    Morales is part of an ambitious government plan to record a comprehensive set of lessons for all grade levels pre-K through high school and then broadcast them on TV.
    It has worked out agreements with different TV channels to broadcast that content, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, with different grade levels at different hours.
    Omar Morales, right, part actor, part teacher, practices delivering a lesson plan about the elements of sound that will eventually be watched by millions.
    Omar Morales, right, part actor, part teacher, practices delivering a lesson plan about the elements of sound that will eventually be watched by millions.
    The government will also use radio programs to reach kids with no TV or internet, the majority of which the government says live in remote indigenous communities.
    “There is no precedent for something this big,” said Rodolfo Lara Ponte, who runs the radio education program during the pandemic.
    “We have planned to have 640 programs, across 18 radio stations in 15 states of the country,” he said, adding many are recorded in indigenous languages unique to different regions.
    For now, both the TV and radio programs will run through December but everything is subject to change based on how the pandemic plays out here over the next several months.
    Government officials overseeing the program uniformly say the goal is to get kids back in the classroom as soon as possible, but for now, they say they’re doing their best.
    “It was a tough decision not to reopen schools,” said Maria Meléndez, the ministry’s Director of Curriculum Development. “But by doing the TV and radio classes, that means not letting the education gap get wider.”

    Using the above familiy

  31. I urges all today to read this

    Mind the gap
    “Education gap” is a polite way of saying that rich kids often get better educations than poor kids.
    This was a problem in Mexico even before the coronavirus forced schools to close in March. For example, relatively wealthy Mexico City saw a 92% secondary, or high-school level, education enrollment rate as of 2019. In the much poorer state of Chiapas, that rate stood at only 59%.
    But the pandemic could exacerbate what was already an acute problem — and television and radio can’t solve underlying disparities.
    You don’t need to be an education expert to conclude that wealthier students with internet access and the ability to interact with a teacher, even remotely, might fare better than those who get their classes the same way they watch cartoons.

  32. In Nigeria, though certificate classes in high schools have re-open for their exams for 1 month today the rest of other classes and tertiary institutions are yet to be open. this means in Nigeria, approximately 90% of previously school children before COVID-19 are still not learning formally during COVID-19, couple with 2019 data of 13 million out of school children. This is a real challenge hence my initiative Eduheal is ensuring that nigeria children learn as much as possible through daily referrals to local television and radio educational programmes, eduheal social media educational programme etc.

    With the challenges presented once more in this article, we are requesting campus members to support Eduheal to serve those children not learning right now. Please vote and comment on Eduheal @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17805/.

    Also Eduheal seek the support of other donor agencies to partner with us in providing eduational opportunities to all children in Nigeria not learning right now. Suggest donors @[email protected] or [email protected]

    Thank you campus administrator for sharing this article. It has further push my motivation to forge ahead in implementing my idea inspite of present financila deficiencies experienced

  33. While many children in cities have been able to attend classes online, those in places, where telecom networks are poor and power supply is often erratic, have gone months without opening schoolbooks.

    Parents who hope for better lives for their children, are pushing them to attend the mobile classes.

  34. Inside a brightly lit studio at Mexico City TV station Channel 11 last week, fifth grade teacher Omar Morales squinted as a young man with bright purple hair applied makeup to his face.
    “Ok, this is your floor director,” a producer told him. “She is your eyes and ears out here, listen to what she tells you, look at the camera she tells you to look at and you’ll be fine.”
    This time last year, Morales was just a public school teacher setting up his classroom, getting ready to hug his kids on their first day of school.
    Now, part actor, part teacher, he practiced delivering a lesson plan about the elements of sound that will eventually be watched by millions.
    “It’s challenging,” he says modestly. “It’s no longer 40 kids in a class where I know their names, passions, their favorite games. Here, I’m locked in a set, but I know there’s millions of kids out there who still need that knowledge.”

  35. Here, another major gap comes to attention. The digital gap. The transition from school to online learning was abrupt and numerous countries and their educational systems were unprepared. Many have still not managed to come up with proper inclusive strategies. However, as issues vary from one country to another, so do solutions that guarantee a higher level of inclusiveness. For example, various countries where the rate of the internet is too low put school on TV. This is a good solution for millions of children in those countries that won’t re-open schools again in 2020. The TV is more useful when it comes to subjects such as mathematics as children can have visual access to what the teacher is writing on the blackboard. The radio would be more apt for subjects such as art, literature, or history.

  36. Children in India have been learning through loudspeakers, in an initiative that aims to reach 1,000 students who have been denied formal classes since schools have shut.
    The children sing songs and answer questions, speaking of the loudspeaker as ‘Speaker Brother’ or ‘Speaker Sister’.
    Response to the programme has been encouraging thus far, in a region where connectivity issues make remote learning difficult.

  37. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    i think at this point, the education of the people of the Condor and the Eagle are okay

  38. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap – l believe the only way to bridge the gap of learning in the world is to promote the use of technology in humanity. That’s the only way l think the educational gap can be bridged.

  39. QUESTIONS: How has education been affected in your country? Are schools going to reopen? Can you think about an inclusive solution that contributes to SDG 4 and provides access to education to those who need it most?
    ANSWERS: People with their education completion still pending no longer have the educational knowledge impacted on them. Schools will definitely reopen, but the question is ‘When’? Yes l can and l have. ‘Music for Masses’ and ‘Kids with Toys’ will deem it fit.

  40. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    More information on NAIROBI, Kenya — For Esther Adhiambo, this year was supposed to be a year of endings and new beginnings.

  41. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    She was expecting to complete high school, enroll in a university and get a job to help her single mother, who runs a small tailoring business in Nairobi’s Mathare slum.

  42. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    Instead, for Ms. Adhiambo and other Kenyan students, 2020 is turning out to be the year that disappeared.

  43. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    Education officials announced in July that they were canceling the academic year and making students repeat it.

  44. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    They are not expected to begin classes again until January, the usual start of Kenya’s school year.

  45. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    Education experts believe Kenya is the only nation to have gone so far as to declare the entire school year a total washout, and order students to start over.

  46. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    “It’s a sad and great loss,” said Ms. Adhiambo, 18, who wants to get a degree and a job in mass communications to help support her seven siblings. “This pandemic has destroyed everything.”

  47. The TV is more useful when it comes to subjects such as mathematics as children can have visual access to what the teacher is writing on the blackboard.

  48. The radio would be more apt for subjects such as art, literature, or history.

  49. Loudspeakers for teachers
    In Indian villages, children sitting in designated social distancing spots have learned through loudspeakers. Recorded lessons were put on loudspeakers and were widely welcomed by parents and children in rural villages.

  50. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    In addition to juliuschiemezue’s comment,
    Kids in such remote areas had no opportunity to get lessons since when the school closed.

  51. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    On the other hand, countries like Kenya took a different approach.

  52. Anonymous

    01.09.2020 · Reply

    They canceled the academic year and will start it over again.

  53. You have to adapt’
    Mariana, the single mom who works from home, says she is ready for the challenge. She’s even prepared daily schedules for her daughter, 12-year-old Giselle, and for her neighbors’ two young daughters, Tania, 6, and Fatima, 9.
    “It has to work,” she told us over a steaming cup of green tea. “You can’t ever compare this to in-person classes but we need to give our all. We need to adapt.”
    Tania and Fatima agree — mostly. We asked them what they’d miss about not going to school.

    “My friends,” said Tania. “And my teacher.”
    For kids, there are some things even a little extra TV time can’t fix.

    things like this can help, lets read and reflect on Mexico perspective thanks to all contestants 2020

  54. Yes we Nigerian entrepreneurs can help refine our ideas and projects to transform Nigeria, just like

    On the other hand, countries like Kenya took a different approach.

  55. If you look at this:

    Kids in such remote areas had no opportunity to get lessons since when the school closed.

    I think we can check on Richard Branson’s quote, that says, that it not only in stuffy classrooms or university’s environment that school can be hold, but everywhere at any time

  56. If we look at this article above, I want us to know that the way out is “Virtuality”

    Do we all agree with me?
    If yes, why not read the book Brains versus Capital for more emphasis, Or?

  57. It is an undeniable fact that the number of children learning has dropped drastically within the COVID 19 era. It is therefore important everyone put their hands on deck to ensure that children access education and learning; girls, those that were previously learning and the challenge children alike

  58. Social distancing becomes the norm, gaps in education grow wider. Before the COVID-19 outbreak, educators, researchers, and parents would often mention the summer learning loss. The term stands for an educational phenomenon where children and teens lose some of the knowledge they acquired during the previous year. Another point researchers agreed about was that inequalities in children’s lives would impact their summer learning loss. This means that those living in lower socio-economic conditions would experience a harsher impact on their

  59. It is less likely to come across some math problems unless the children are specifically looking for that type of content or books. Moreover, people living in poor or disadvantaged areas don’t have the same access to summer courses or learning programs.

  60. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    From the SDG 4

    Education enables upward socioeconomic mobility and is a key to escaping poverty.

  61. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    Over the past decade, major progress was made towards increasing access to education and school enrollment rates at all levels, particularly for girls.

  62. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    Nevertheless, about 260 million children were still out of school in 2018 — nearly one fifth of the global population in that age group.

  63. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    And more than half of all children and adolescents worldwide are not meeting minimum proficiency standards in reading and mathematics.

  64. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    In 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic spread across the globe, a majority of countries announced the temporary closure of schools, impacting more than 91 per cent of students worldwide.

  65. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    By April 2020, close to 1.6 billion children and youth were out of school. And nearly 369 million children who rely on school meals needed to look to other sources for daily nutrition.

  66. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    Never before have so many children been out of school at the same time, disrupting learning and upending lives, especially the most vulnerable and marginalised.

  67. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    The global pandemic has far-reaching consequences that may jeopardize hard won gains made in improving global education.

  68. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    COVID-19 response to goal 4
    In an effort to foster international collaboration and ensure that education never stops, UNESCO is mounting a response with a set of initiatives that include the global monitoring of national and localized school closures.

  69. Children in India have been learning through loudspeakers, in an initiative that aims to reach 1,000 students who have been denied formal classes since schools have shut.
    The children sing songs and answer questions, speaking of the loudspeaker as ‘Speaker Brother’ or ‘Speaker Sister’.
    Response to the programme has been encouraging thus far, in a region where connectivity issues make remote learning difficult.
    One overcast morning in a farming village in hilly western India, a group of schoolchildren sat on the mud floor of a wooden shed for their first class in months.

    There was no teacher, just a voice from a loudspeaker.

    The recorded lessons form part of an initiative by an Indian non-profit spread over six villages that aims to reach 1,000 students denied formal classes since the coronavirus pandemic forced schools to close four months ago.

  70. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    To protect the well-being of children and ensure they have access to continued learning, UNESCO in March 2020 launched the COVID-19 Global Education Coalition, a multi-sector partnership between the UN family, civil society organizations, media and IT partners to design and deploy innovative solutions.

  71. Have you read?

    How data science can help India’s frontline workers in the fight against COVID-19
    Why India has the upper hand against COVID-19 
    The children sang rhymes and answered questions, with some of them speaking of the loudspeaker as ‘Speaker Brother’ or ‘Speaker Sister’.

    “I love studying with Speaker Brother,” said Jyoti, a gleeful 11-year-old girl who attended one session.

    Reuters followed the volunteers last week as they carried the loudspeaker through villages in the Indian state of Maharashtra where children awaiting its arrival had gathered at designated, socially-distanced spots.

    “We wondered if children and their parents would accept a loudspeaker as their teacher,” said Shraddha Shringarpure, head of the Diganta Swaraj Foundation, which has done development work for more than a decade among tribal villages in the region.

    • Anonymous

      03.09.2020 · Reply

      I agree with this. In addition to the above comment:
      But response to the programme, called ‘Bolki Shaala’ or ‘Spoken School’ in the state language of Marathi, has been encouraging, Shringarpure added.

      It reaches children who are usually the first in their families to go to school, with content covering part of the school curriculum, as well as social skills and English language lessons.

      “These kids have no guidance from their family, they are on their own,” Shringarpure said.

      While many children in cities have been able to attend classes online, those in places like Dandwal, where telecom networks are poor and power supply is often erratic, have gone months without opening schoolbooks.

      Parents like Sangeeta Yele, who hope for better lives for their children, are pushing them to attend the mobile classes.

      “As the school is closed, my son used to wander in the forests,” said Yele.

      “‘Bolki Shaala’ has reached our village and now my son has started studying. I am happy. It gives me happiness that my son can now sing songs and narrate stories.”

      For more innovations and ideas that could help fight the COVID-19 pandemic, visit UpLink.

  72. In addition to juliusanayochukwu’s comment, they help countries tackle content and connectivity gaps, and facilitate inclusive learning opportunities for children and youth during this period of sudden and unprecedented educational disruption.

  73. Specifically, the Global Education Coalition aims to:

    Help countries in mobilizing resources and implementing innovative and context-appropriate solutions to provide education remotely, leveraging hi-tech, low-tech and no-tech approaches;
    Seek equitable solutions and universal access;
    Ensure coordinated responses and avoid overlapping efforts;
    Facilitate the return of students to school when they reopen to avoid an upsurge in dropout rates.

  74. UNICEF also scaled up its work in 145 low- and middle-income countries to support governments and education partners in developing plans for a rapid, system-wide response including alternative learning programmes and mental health support.

  75. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    Some facts about SDG 4
    Before the coronavirus crisis, projections showed that more than 200 million children would be out of school, and only 60 per cent of young people would be completing upper secondary education in 2030.

  76. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    Before the coronavirus crisis, the proportion of children and youth out of primary and secondary school had declined from 26 per cent in 2000 to 19 per cent in 2010 and 17 per cent in 2018.

  77. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    More than half of children that have not enrolled in school live in sub-Saharan Africa, and more than 85 per cent of children in sub-Saharan Africa are not learning the minimum
    617 million youth worldwide lack basic mathematics and literacy skills.

  78. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    Some 750 million adults – two thirds of them women – remained illiterate in 2016. Half of the global illiterate population lives in South Asia, and a quarter live in sub-Saharan Africa.

  79. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    In 10 low- and middle-income countries, children with disabilities were 19per cent less likely to achieve minimum proficiency in reading than those without disabilities.

  80. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    4 million refugee children were out of school in 2017

  81. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    You’ll learn more and see more when you join the competition
    About the competition

    The Citizen Entrepreneurship Competition (CEC) is a part of the Entrepreneurship Campus and was initiated to empower entrepreneurs all around the world to create innovative answers to global and/or community challenges and to engage in a more peaceful and sustainable world.

  82. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    You are invited to submit your innovative ideas and projects with a societal impact, which champion and implement one or more of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs and 169 related targets address the most important social, economic, environmental, health and governmental challenges of our time.

  83. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    Before, during and after the CEC you have the possibility to take two courses to help develop a sustainable business model from your idea. You will gain knowledge that can be helpful to change or upgrade existing projects as well. The Brain versus Capital (BvC) course serves as a basis and can also be completed without prior registration. The additional Sustainable Entrepreneurship Course (SEC) is recommended to be done after the end of the BvC course. Both courses are free of charge.

  84. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    Note: Taking the BvC and/or SEC course is not mandatory to take part in the Citizen Entrepreneurship Competition. However, it is a helpful tool to get the greatest possible potential out of your ideas and projects.

  85. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    If you are between 13 and 29 years old, please submit your idea and/or project in the Youth Citizen Entrepreneurship category. If you are 30+ you can submit your idea and/or project to the Adult Citizen Entrepreneurship category. Please make sure that you submit your entry into the right category. If not, your entry cannot be included in the competition. You will have to delete the entry and submit it again.

  86. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    During the Youth Citizen Entrepreneurship Competition 2019, we were happy to feature a special category: Tourism Competition. In this category, ideas and projects were sought that primarily specialize in sustainable tourism, and offer solutions on how tourism can be done more sustainably. Join the second round of the Social Entrepreneurship in Tourism Competition now.

  87. “.things are never as complicated as they seem. It is only our arrogance that prompts us to find unnecessarily complicated answers to simple problems.”
    Never
    Muhammad Yunus

    Can this quote aid this distance learning article?
    Do we agree all campus members and 2020 contestants?
    Have you read Brains versus Capital?
    If Yes what have you gain?
    If no why not?

  88. “I was teaching in one of the universities while the country was suffering from a severe famine. People were dying of hunger, and I felt very helpless. As an economist, I had no tool in my tool box to fix that kind of situation.”
    Muhammad Yunus

    Can this quote aid this distance learning article?
    Do we agree all campus members and 2020 contestants?
    Have you read Brains versus Capital?
    If Yes what have you gain?
    If no why not?

  89. Anonymous

    03.09.2020 · Reply

    Is there any other way one can bridge the gap of education apart from technology promotion?

  90. “Poverty does not belong in civilized human society. Its proper place is in a museum. That’s where it will be.”
    Will
    Muhammad Yunus

    Can this quote aid this distance learning article?
    Do we agree all campus members and 2020 contestants?
    Have you read Brains versus Capital?
    If Yes what have you gain?
    If no why not?

  91. “I have always said that human beings are multidimensional beings. Their happiness comes from many sources, not, as our current economic framework assumes, just from making money.”
    Money Happiness
    Muhammad Yunus

    Can this quote aid this distance learning article?
    Do we agree all campus members and 2020 contestants?
    Have you read Brains versus Capital?
    If Yes what have you gain?
    If no why not?

  92. “I have always said that human beings are multidimensional beings. Their happiness comes from many sources, not, as our current economic framework assumes, just from making money.”
    Money Happiness
    Muhammad Yunus

    Can this quote aid this distance learning article?
    Do we agree all campus members and 2020 contestants?
    Have you read Brains versus Capital?
    If Yes what have you gain?
    If no why not?

  93. “We prepare our students for jobs and careers, but we don’t teach them to think as individuals about what kind of world they would create.”
    Think

    Can this quote aid this distance learning article?
    Do we agree all campus members and 2020 contestants?
    Have you read Brains versus Capital?
    If Yes what have you gain?
    If no why not?

  94. Based on these facts, experts say that the level of knowledge loss during 2020 due to school closures can be higher. Al children especially disadvantaged children and those with special needs are falling behind every day they’re out of school or can’t access online education.

  95. Another point researchers agreed about was that inequalities in children’s lives would impact their summer learning loss. This means that those living in lower socio economic conditions would experience a harsher impact on their

  96. Another point researchers agreed about was that inequalities in children’s lives would impact their summer learning loss. This means that those living in lower socio economic conditions would experience a harsher impact on their

  97. How has education been affected in your country? Are schools going to reopen? Can you think about an inclusive solution that contributes to SDG 4 and provides access to education to those who need it most?

    How I wish all contestants 20-20 take their precious time to think about the above statement!

  98. Concentrate your energies, your thoughts and your capital. The wise man puts all his eggs in one basket and watches the basket.

    Andrew Carnegie

    This quote is an eye opener for all members in this platform

  99. The ‘morality of compromise’ sounds contradictory. Compromise is usually a sign of weakness, or an admission of defeat. Strong men don’t compromise, it is said, and principles should never be compromised.

    Andrew Carnegie

    let’s us embrace this for the distance learning progress…

  100. The ‘morality of compromise’ sounds contradictory. Compromise is usually a sign of weakness, or an admission of defeat. Strong men don’t compromise, it is said, and principles should never be compromised.

    Andrew Carnegie

    this quote is necessary for All to refine education system now!!!!!

  101. No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit for doing it.

    Andrew Carnegie

    Do we know that this quote is imperative to bridge the gap?
    If yes have you read Brains versus Capital from pages 160 to end?

  102. And while the law of competition may be sometimes hard for the individual, it is best for the race, because it ensures the survival of the fittest in every department.

    Andrew Carnegie

    Let’s embrace and comply with Carnegie’s words

  103. i want to ask questions, questions, questions since I am entrepeneur ephraim

    Mein bin eis entrepeneur Ephraim

    Do you comply with those quote above?
    Have you decide to be unconventional?
    Have you start opening up youre heart and mind for a new concept?
    Then are you ready to read Brains beat Capital book by Professor Faltin?
    Take BvC and SEC courses online?

    Guten Abend to my Co contestants 2020

  104. knowledge during the time away from school. At the same, the impact would be bigger for children and students with different disabilities as they have greater needs for ongoing learning. Otherwise, progress can be lost.

  105. Here, another major gap comes to attention. The digital gap. The transition from school to online learning was abrupt and numerous countries and their educational systems were unprepared

  106. For the last six months here in kenya we have witnessed the global turmoil affecting our core foundation EDUCATION,lessons i have learnt are that we should ideat new tools,adapt more methods of responsibility and utilise any opportunity to make SDG4 ultimate goal working for a common goal and pursue it from a common ground. This necessitates into setting a GLOBAL MENTALITY amongst all citizens, government, NGOs, private and public initiative. I would propose STEM education installed in our new generations a global mentality on which they can use their knowledge for the well-being of our communities. So then the question becomes: how can we achieve this in a “new normal”. The answer then turns into a series of considerations and infinite factors that can influence the way our future generations engage, learn, and live in a world that seemingly will not be similar to what most of us knew.not forgeting that progress is meant to signify a process under which we improve, enhance, and correct the situations we live through. This is also means that it becomes a responsibility for us to generate ways on which we inspire our kids to become the scientists, engineers, doctors, mathematicians, biologists, physicists, geneticists, that will h-e-l-p change the world: that fact will always remain there.In a world where STEM fields were seen as too hard to pursue, limited to only a certain part of the population, unattainable, and difficult to get access to proper material to engage in, we must turn the global mentality of the “new normal” to progress on the matter. We can achieve such by becoming a world where STEM education is affordable, accessible, and attractive for our youth. A world where science is no longer seen as nerdy, but as cool ,fun,and engaging society.After all, these latter descriptions are true, but still not well-known in our current educational culture. Moreover, STEM education is highly prone to be engaged under international cooperation. Virtual tools and the ease to communicate with people from all over the world facilitates the opportunity to work collaboratively from abroad.High-end STEM requires materials and machinery, which require access to financial resources, core STEM activities and learning resources for youth to engage ALSO can be even done with household materials. As we promote a philosophy that gives STEM education and STEM fields the relevance it deserves, pressure upon governments and the education system to invest and impulse will rise.
    Consider supporting my idea @
    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/18538
    Regards,
    Karanja.

  107. Based on these facts, experts say that the level of knowledge loss during 2020 due to school closures can be higher. Al children especially disadvantaged children and those with special needs are falling behind every day they’re out of school or can’t access online edu

  108. For the last six months here in kenya we have witnessed the global turmoil affecting our core foundation EDUCATION,lessons i have learnt are that we should ideat new tools,adapt more methods of responsibility and utilise any opportunity to make SDG4 ultimate goal working for a common goal and pursue it from a common ground. This necessitates into setting a GLOBAL MENTALITY amongst all citizens, government, NGOs, private and public initiative. I would propose STEM education installed in our new generations a global mentality on which they can use their knowledge for the well-being of our communities. So then the question becomes: how can we achieve this in a “new normal”. The answer then turns into a series of considerations and infinite factors that can influence the way our future generations engage, learn, and live in a world that seemingly will not be similar to what most of us knew.not forgeting that progress is meant to signify a process under which we improve, enhance, and correct the situations we live through. This is also means that it becomes a responsibility for us to generate ways on which we inspire our kids to become the scientists, engineers, doctors, mathematicians, biologists, physicists, geneticists, that will h-e-l-p change the world: that fact will always remain there.In a world where STEM fields were seen as too hard to pursue, limited to only a certain part of the population, unattainable, and difficult to get access to proper material to engage in, we must turn the global mentality of the “new normal” to progress on the matter. We can achieve such by becoming a world where STEM education is affordable, accessible, and attractive for our youth. A world where science is no longer seen as nerdy, but as cool ,fun,and engaging society.After all, these latter descriptions are true, but still not well-known in our current educational culture. Moreover, STEM education is highly prone to be engaged under international cooperation. Virtual tools and the ease to communicate with people from all over the world facilitates the opportunity to work collaboratively from abroad.High-end STEM requires materials and machinery, which require access to financial resources, core STEM activities and learning resources for youth to engage ALSO can be even done with household materials. As we promote a philosophy that gives STEM education and STEM fields the relevance it deserves, pressure upon governments and the education system to invest and impulse will rise.

    i really agree with Karanja
    Consider supporting my idea @
    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/?
    Regards,
    ephraim essien.

  109. Do not look for approval except for the consciousness of doing your best.” – Andrew Carnegie

    Quote of this sort can triggers ideas and projects

  110. The man who acquires the ability to take full possession of his own mind may take possession of anything else to which he is justly entitled.” – Andrew Carnegie

    Quote of this sort can triggers ideas and projects

    Consider supporting my idea @
    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/?
    Regards,
    ephraim essien.

  111. Success can be attained in any branch of human labor. There is always room at the top in every pursuit. Concentrate all your thought and energy upon the performance of your duties.” – Andrew Carnegie
    Quote of this sort can triggers ideas and projects

    Consider supporting my idea @
    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/?
    Regards,
    ephraim essien.

  112. Aim for the highest.” – Andrew Carnegie

    Quote of this sort can triggers ideas and projects

    Consider supporting my idea @
    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/?
    Regards,
    ephraim essien.

  113. Ms. Adhiambo and other Kenyan students, 2020 is turning out to be the year that disappeared. Education officials announced in July that they were canceling the academic year and making students repeat it. They are not expected to begin classes again until January, the usual start of Kenya’s school year.

    Education experts believe Kenya is the only nation to have gone so far as to declare the entire school year a total washout, and order students to start over.

    “It’s a sad and great loss,” said Ms. Adhiambo, 18, who wants to get a degree and a job in mass communications to help support her seven siblings. “This pandemic has destroyed everything.”

  114. There is little success where there is little laughter.” – Andrew Carnegi

    Quote of this sort can triggers ideas and projects

    Consider supporting my idea @
    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/?
    Regards,
    ephraim essien.

  115. Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision. It is the fuel that allows common people to attain uncommon results.” – Andrew Carnegie

    Quote of this sort can triggers ideas and projects

    Consider supporting my idea @
    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/?
    Regards,
    ephraim essien.

  116. “No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit for doing it.” – Andrew Carnegie

    Quote of this sort can triggers ideas and projects

    Consider supporting my idea @
    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/?
    Regards,
    ephraim essien.

  117. The decision to suspend the academic year affects more than 90,000 schools and over 18 million students in pre-primary through high school, including 150,000 more in refugee camps, according to the education ministry. National exams usually taken by students in their last year of primary school and high school have also been postponed, and there will be no intake of new students in 2021.The decision to suspend the academic year affects more than 90,000 schools and over 18 million students in pre-primary through high school, including 150,000 more in refugee camps, according to the education ministry. National exams usually taken by students in their last year of primary school and high school have also been postponed, and there will be no intake of new students in 2021.

  118. You cannot push anyone up the ladder unless he is willing to climb.” – Andrew Carnegie

    Quote of this sort can triggers ideas and projects

    Consider supporting my idea @
    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17721/?
    Regards,
    ephraim essien.

  119. Learning gaps can be bridged over time. … Here’s a few ideas:
    1
    Have your students draw what they understand about a topic or concept.
    2
    Play icebreaking games that test students’ knowledge.
    3
    Use a writing game for a quick snapshot of students’ writing, spelling, handwriting and language conventions.

  120. How online education Bridges learn gaps?
    Students are able to converse in real-time as they learn through an online chat platform or social media. This makes it possible for them to share ideas and thoughts which will not only facilitate their learning but will support a deeper understanding of topics.

  121. What are gaps in learning?
    Generally speaking, learning gap refers to the relative performance of individual students—i.e., the disparity between what a student has actually learned and what he or she was expected to learn at a particular age or grade level.

  122. How do you close a learning gap?
    Adapt these tried-and-tested methods to begin closing the achievement gap:
    1
    Set benchmarks and track progress. …
    2
    Build in time for student self-reflection. …
    3
    Keep an open mind and avoid assumptions. …
    4
    Develop relationships with parents. …
    5
    Introduce texts and topics that are culturally relevant. …
    6
    Personalize learning.

  123. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Based on these facts, experts say that the level of knowledge loss during 2020 due to school closures can be higher.

  124. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    All kids especially disadvantaged children and those with special needs are falling behind every day they’re out of school or can’t access online education.

  125. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Innovative solutions from around the world

    In this case, innovation doesn’t mean cutting edge technology.

  126. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    It stands for simple practical solutions that people use to address a major concern.

  127. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Here, another major gap comes to attention.

  128. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The digital gap. The transition from school to online learning was abrupt and numerous countries and their educational systems were unprepared.

  129. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Many have still not managed to come up with proper inclusive strategies.

  130. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    However, as issues vary from one country to another, so do solutions that guarantee a higher level of inclusiveness.

  131. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    For example, various countries where the rate of the internet is too low put school on TV.

  132. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    This is a good solution for millions of children in those countries that won’t re-open schools again in 2020.

  133. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The TV is more useful when it comes to subjects such as mathematics as children can have visual access to what the teacher is writing on the blackboard.

  134. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The radio would be more apt for subjects such as art, literature, or history.

  135. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Will colleges be online in fall 2020?
    ‘The virus beat us’: Colleges are increasingly going online for fall 2020 semester as COVID-19 cases rise. Call it coronavirus déjà vu. After planning ways to reopen campuses this fall, colleges are increasingly changing their minds, dramatically increasing online offerings or canceling in-person classes outright.

  136. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Distance education, also called distance learning, is the education of students who may not always be physically present at a school.

  137. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Traditionally, this usually involved correspondence courses wherein the student corresponded with the school via post.

  138. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    How do you prepare for distance learning in the fall?
    How teachers can prepare for successful distance learning this…
    1
    Conduct a needs assessment of yourself. …
    2
    Learn from peers. …
    3
    Use resources designed in response to current circumstances. …
    4
    Create a plan to stay connected to parents regardless of technology access level. …
    5
    Focus on the needs of each student.

  139. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Today, it involves online education. A distance learning program can be completely distance learning, or a combination of distance learning and traditional classroom instruction (called hybridor blended).

  140. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs), offering large-scale interactive participation and open access through the World Wide Web or other network technologies, are recent educational modes in distance education.

  141. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    How do you prepare for distance learning?
    Top 10 Study Tips
    1
    Get prepared and make a plan. Distance learning is self-paced. …
    2
    Organise your study space. There’s no right or wrong place to study – if it works for you, that’s great. …
    3
    Get familiar with your course pages. …
    4
    Discover your learning style. …
    5
    Set study goals. …
    6
    Review your work regularly. …
    7
    Ask for help if you get stuck. …
    8
    Stay motivated.

  142. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Remote Learning First Week of School Activities
    1
    Take students on a tour of their virtual classroom.
    2
    Let kids decorate their virtual classroom!
    3
    Have students create their own virtual background.
    4
    Get to know each other AND Flipgrid with an “All about me!” topic.
    5
    Design a poster all about you!
    6
    Play back to school BINGO.

  143. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    A number of other terms (distributed learning, e-learning, m-learning, online learning, virtual classroom etc.) are used roughly synonymously with distance education

  144. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    One of the earliest attempts was advertised in 1728. This was in the Boston Gazette for “Caleb Philipps, Teacher of the new method of Short Hand”, who sought students who wanted to learn through weekly mailed lessons.

  145. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The first distance education course in the modern sense was provided by Sir Isaac Pitman in the 1840s, who taught a system of shorthand by mailing texts transcribed into shorthand on postcards and receiving transcriptions from his students in return for correction.

  146. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The element of student feedback was a crucial innovation in Pitman’s system.This scheme was made possible by the introduction of uniform postage rates across England in 1840.

  147. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    This early beginning proved extremely successful, and the Phonographic Correspondence Society was founded three years later to establish these courses on a more formal basis.

  148. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The Society paved the way for the later formation of Sir Isaac Pitman Colleges across the country.

  149. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The first correspondence school in the United States was the Society to Encourage Studies at Home, which was founded in 1873.

  150. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Founded in 1894, Wolsey Hall, Oxford was the first distance learning college in the UK.

  151. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    University correspondence courses Edit
    The University of London was the first university to offer distance learning degrees, establishing its External Programme in 1858.

  152. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The background to this innovation lay in the fact that the institution (later known as University College London) was non-denominational, and given the intense religious rivalries at the time, there was an outcry against the “godless” university.

  153. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    In my own perspective, one way to bridge the gap of learning is to promote ‘online learning’.
    1. What is the online learning?
    Online learning is education that takes place over the Internet. It is often referred to as “e- learning” among other terms. However, online learning is just one type of “distance learning” – the umbrella term for any learning that takes place across distance and not in a traditional classroom.
    2. What are benefits of online learning?
    Benefits of Online Education
    Flexibility. Students have the freedom to juggle their careers and school because they aren’t tied down to a fixed schedule. …
    Reduced Costs. Online education can cost less due to a variety of reasons. …
    Networking Opportunities. …
    Documentation. …
    Increased Instructor – Student Time. …
    Access to Expertise.
    3. What are the best online learning sites?
    Coursera. Coursera has partnered with leading universities in the U.S. and around the world to provide online courses covering dozens of different subjects. …
    Lynda.com. A veteran in the online education space, Lynda.com offers a subscription-based video tutorial library. …
    Udemy. …
    Udacity. …
    Khan Academy. …
    Codecademy. …
    Bloc. …
    iversity.
    4. How can I study online at home?
    Tips for studying online and at home for university students
    1
    Engage with your learning. …
    2
    Coordinate group chats. …
    3
    Keep in touch with your tutor and lecturers. …
    4
    5 revision techniques to help you ace exam season (plus 7 more unusual approaches)
    5
    Ensure you have all the right tools to study. …
    6
    Think about your work space at home. …
    7
    Take regular breaks.
    Make this your study focus members!

  154. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The issue soon boiled down to which institutions had degree-granting powers and which institutions did not.

  155. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The compromise solution that emerged in 1836 was that the sole authority to conduct the examinations leading to degrees would be given to a new officially recognized entity called the “University of London”, which would act as examining body for the University of London colleges, originally University College London and King’s College London, and award their students University of London degrees.

  156. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    As Sheldon Rothblatt states: “Thus arose in nearly archetypal form the famous English distinction between teaching and examining, here embodied in separate institutions.”

  157. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    With the state giving examining powers to a separate entity, the groundwork was laid for the creation of a program within the new university which would both administer examinations and award qualifications to students taking instruction at another institution or pursuing a course of self-directed study.

  158. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Referred to as “People’s University” by Charles Dickens because it provided access to higher education to students from less affluent backgrounds, the External Programme was chartered by Queen Victoria in 1858, making the University of London the first university to offer distance learning degrees to students.

  159. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Benefits of distance learning
    Distance learning can expand access to education and training for both general populace and businesses since its flexible scheduling structure lessens the effects of the many time-constraints imposed by personal responsibilities and commitments.

  160. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Devolving some activities off-site alleviates institutional capacity constraints arising from the traditional demand on institutional buildings and infrastructure.

  161. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Furthermore, there is the potential for increased access to more experts in the field and to other students from diverse geographical, social, cultural, economic, and experiential backgrounds.

  162. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    As the population at large becomes more involved in lifelong learning beyond the normal schooling age, institutions can benefit financially, and adult learning business courses may be particularly lucrative.

  163. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Distance education programs can act as a catalyst for institutional innovation and are at least as effective as face-to-face learning programs,especially if the instructor is knowledgeable and skilled.

  164. Distance education can also provide a broader method of communication within the realm of education.

  165. With the many tools and programs that technological advancements have to offer, communication appears to increase in distance education amongst students and their professors, as well as students and their classmates.

  166. The distance educational increase in communication, particularly communication amongst students and their classmates, is an improvement that has been made to provide distance education students with as many of the opportunities as possible as they would receive in in-person education.

  167. The improvement being made in distance education is growing in tandem with the constant technological advancements.

  168. Present-day online communication allows students to associate with accredited schools and programs throughout the world that are out of reach for in-person learning. By having the opportunity to be involved in global institutions via distance education, a diverse array of thought is presented to students through communication with their classmates.

  169. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    Distance learning is beneficial because students have the opportunity to “combine new opinions with their own, and develop a solid foundation for learning”.

  170. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    It has been shown through research that “as learners become aware of the variations in interpretation and construction of meaning among a range of people [they] construct an individual meaning”, which can help students become knowledgeable of a wide array of viewpoints in education.

  171. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    To increase the likelihood that students will build effective ties with one another during the course, instructors should use similar assignments for students across different locations to overcome the influence of co-location on relationship building.

  172. Anonymous

    05.09.2020 · Reply

    The high cost of education affects students in higher education, to which distance education may be an alternative in order to provide some relief.[78][77] Distance education has been a more cost-effective form of learning, and can sometimes save students a significant amount of money as opposed to traditional education.[77] Distance education may be able to help to save students a considerable amount financially by removing the cost of transportation.[81] In addition, distance education may be able to save students from the economic burden of high-priced course textbooks. Many textbooks are now available as electronic textbooks, known as e-textbooks, which can offer digital textbooks for a reduced price in comparison to traditional textbooks. Also, the increasing improvements in technology have resulted in many school libraries having a partnership with digital publishers that offer course materials for free, which can help students significantly with educational costs.[81]

    Within the class, students are able to learn in ways that traditional classrooms would not be able to provide. It is able to promote good learning experiences and therefore, allow students to obtain higher satisfaction with their online learning.[82] For example, students can review their lessons more than once according to their needs. Students can then manipulate the coursework to fit their learning by focusing more on their weaker topics while breezing through concepts that they already have or can easily grasp.[82] When course design and the learning environment are at their optimal conditions, distance education can lead students to higher satisfaction with their learning experiences.[78] Studies have shown that high satisfaction correlates to increased learning. For those in a healthcare or mental health distance learning program, online-based interactions have the potential to foster deeper reflections and discussions of client issues[66] as well as a quicker response to client issues, since supervision happens on a regular basis and is not limited to a weekly supervision meeting.[77] This also may contribute to the students feeling a greater sense of support, since they have ongoing and regular access to their instructors and other students.[66][69]

    Distance learning may enable students who are unable to attend a traditional school setting, due to disability or illness such as decreased mobility and immune system suppression, to get a good education.[83] Children who are sick or are unable to attend classes are able to attend them in “person” through the use of robot proxies. This helps the students have experiences of the classroom and social interaction that they are unable to receive at home or the hospital, while still keeping them in a safe learning environment. Over the last few years[when?] more students are entering safely back into the classroom thanks to the help of robots. An article from the New York Times, “A Swiveling Proxy Will Even Wear a Tutu”, explains the positive impact of virtual learning in the classroom,[84] and another[85] that explains how even a simple, stationary telepresence robot can help.[86] Distance education may provide equal access regardless of socioeconomic status or income, area of residence, gender, race, age, or cost per student.[87] Applying universal design strategies to distance learning courses as they are being developed (rather than instituting accommodations for specific students on an as-needed basis) can increase the accessibility of such courses to students with a range of abilities, disabilities, learning styles, and native languages.[88] Distance education graduates, who would never have been associated with the school under a traditional system, may donate money to the school.[89]

    Distance learning may also offer a final opportunity for adolescents that are no longer permitted in the general education population due to behavior disorders. Instead of these students having no other academic opportunities, they may continue their education from their homes and earn their diplomas, offering them another chance to be an integral part of society.

    Distance learning offers individuals a unique opportunity to benefit from the expertise and resources of the best universities currently available. Students have the ability to collaborate, share, question, infer, and suggest new methods and techniques for continuous improvement of the content. The ability to complete a course at a pace that is appropriate for each individual is the most effective manner to learn given the personal demands on time and schedule.[77] Self-paced distance learning on a mobile device, such as a smartphone, provides maximum flexibility and capability.

  173. “In this case, innovation doesn’t mean cutting edge technology. It stands for simple practical solutions that people use to address a major concern.”

  174. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    Technology in distant learning
    Internet technology has enabled many forms of distance learning through open educational resources and facilities such as e-learning and MOOCs.

  175. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    Although the expansion of the Internet blurs the boundaries, distance education technologies are divided into two modes of delivery: synchronous learning and asynchronous learning.

  176. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    In synchronous learning, all participants are “present” at the same time in a virtual classroom, as in traditional classroom teaching.

  177. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    It requires a timetable. Web conferencing, videoconferencing, educational television, instructional television are examples of synchronous technology, as are direct-broadcast satellite (DBS), internet radio, live streaming, telephone, and web-based VoIP.

  178. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    Web conferencing software helps to facilitate class meetings, and usually contains additional interaction tools such as text chat, polls, hand raising, emoticons etc.

  179. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    These tools also support asynchronous participation by students who can listen to recordings of synchronous sessions. Immersive environments (notably SecondLife) have also been used to enhance participant presence in distance education courses.

  180. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    Another form of synchronous learning using the classroom is the use of robot proxies including those that allow sick students to attend classes.

  181. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    Some universities have been starting to use robot proxies to enable more engaging synchronous hybrid classes where both remote and in-person students can be present and interact using telerobotics devices such as the Kubi Telepresence robot stand that looks around and the Double Robot that roams around.

  182. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    With these telepresence robots, the remote students have a seat at the table or desk instead of being on a screen on the wall.

  183. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    In asynchronous learning, participants access course materials flexibly on their own schedules. Students are not required to be together at the same time. Mail correspondence, which is the oldest form of distance education, is an asynchronous delivery technology, as are message board forums, e-mail, video and audio recordings, print materials, voicemail, and fax.

  184. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    Distance, learning, bridge, gap are coherent to one another. How? Read the above blog!

  185. From juliusanayochukwu’s comment, The two methods can be combined. Many courses offered by both open universities and an increasing number of campus-based institutions use periodic sessions of residential or day teaching to supplement the sessions delivered at a distance. T

  186. This type of mixed distance and campus-based education has recently come to be called “blended learning” or less often “hybrid learning”. Many open universities use a blend of technologies and a blend of learning modalities (face-to-face, distance, and hybrid) all under the rubric of “distance learning”.

  187. Distance learning can also use interactive radio instruction (IRI), interactive audio instruction (IAI), online virtual worlds, digital games, webinars, and webcasts, all of which are referred to as e-Learning.

  188. The rapid spread of film in the 1920s and radio in the 1930s led to proposals to use it for distance education.

  189. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    Distance learning solutions

    More on UNESCO’s COVID-19 Education Response

     

    The list of educational applications, platforms and resources below aim to help parents, teachers, schools and school administrators facilitate student learning and provide social care and interaction during periods of school closure. Most of the solutions curated are free and many cater to multiple languages. While these solutions do not carry UNESCO’s explicit endorsement, they tend to have a wide reach, a strong user-base and evidence of impact. They are categorized based on distance learning needs, but most of them offer functionalities across multiple categories.
     

    Resources to provide psychosocial support

    InterAgency Standing Committee guidelines to protect and improve people’s mental health and psychosocial well-being in the midst of an emergency
    WHO mental health and psychosocial guidance during the COVID-19 outbreak
    UNICEF guidance on how teachers should talk to children about COVID-19
    UNICEF guidance on how parents and caregivers can talk children about COVID-19
    Digital learning management systems

    CenturyTech – Personal learning pathways with micro-lessons to address gaps in knowledge, challenge students and promote long-term memory retention.
    ClassDojo – Connects teachers with students and parents to build classroom communities.
    Edmodo – Tools and resources to manage classrooms and engage students remotely, offering a variety of languages.
    Edraak – Arabic language online education with resources for school learners and teachers.
    EkStep – Open learning platform with a collection of learning resources to support literacy and numeracy.
    Google Classroom – Helps classes connect remotely, communicate and stay-organized.
    Moodle – Community-driven and globally-supported open learning platform.
    Nafham – Arabic language online learning platform hosting educational video lessons that correspond with Egyptian and Syrian curricula.
    Paper Airplanes – Matches individuals with personal tutors for 12-16 week sessions conducted via video conferencing platforms, available in English and Turkish.
    Schoology – Tools to support instruction, learning, grading, collaboration and assessment.
    Seesaw – Enables the creation of collaborative and sharable digital learning portfolios and learning resources. 
    Skooler – Tools to turn Microsoft Office software into an education platform.

  190. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    Mobile reading applications

    African Storybook – Open access to picture storybooks in 189 African languages.  
    Biblioteca Digital del Instituto Latinoamericano de la Comunicación Educativa – Offers free access to Spanish language works and book collections for students and teaching staff in schools and universities
    Global Digital Library – Digital storybooks and other reading materials easily accessible from mobile phones or computers. Available in 43 languages.
    Interactive Learning Program – Mobile app in Arabic to advance reading, writing and numeracy skills created by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency.
    Reads – Digital stories with illustrations in multiple languages.
    Room to Read – Resources to develop the literacy skills of children and youth with specialized content to support girls.
    StoryWeaver – Digital repository of multilingual stories for children.
    Worldreader – Digital books and stories accessible from mobile devices and functionality to support reading instruction. Available in 52 languages.

  191. By 1938, at least 200 city school systems, 25 state boards of education, and many colleges and universities broadcast educational programs for the public schools.One line of thought was to use radio as a master teacher.

  192. Experts in given fields broadcast lessons for pupils within the many schoolrooms of the public school system, asking questions, suggesting readings, making assignments, and conducting tests. This mechanizes education and leaves the local teacher only the tasks of preparing for the broadcast and keeping order in the classroom.

  193. A typical setup came in Kentucky in 1948 when John Wilkinson Taylor, president of the University of Louisville, teamed up with NBC to use radio as a medium for distance education, The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission endorsed the project and predicted that the “college-by-radio” would put “American education 25 years ahead”. The University was owned by the city, and local residents would pay the low tuition rates, receive their study materials in the mail, and listen by radio to live classroom discussions that were held on campus.[52] Physicist Daniel Q. Posin also was a pioneer in the field of distance education when he hosted a televised course through DePaul University.[53]

  194. Charles Wedemeyer of the University of Wisconsin–Madison also promoted new methods. From 1964 to 1968, the Carnegie Foundation funded Wedemeyer’s Articulated Instructional Media Project (AIM) which brought in a variety of communications technologies aimed at providing learning to an off-campus population. The radio courses faded away in the 1950s.[54] Many efforts to use television along the same lines proved unsuccessful, despite heavy funding by the Ford Foundation.[55][56][57]

    From 1970 to 1972 the Coordinating Commission for Higher Education in California funded Project Outreach to study the potential of telecourses. The study included the University of California, California State University, and the community colleges. This study led to coordinated instructional systems legislation allowing the use of public funds for non-classroom instruction and paved the way for the emergence of telecourses as the precursor to the online courses and programs of today. The Coastline Community Colleges, The Dallas County Community College District, and Miami Dade Community College led the way. The Adult Learning Service of the US Public Broadcasting Service came into being and the “wrapped” series, and individually produced telecourse for credit became a significant part of the history of distance education and online learning.

  195. Systems built for use on basic mobile phones

    Cell-Ed – Learner-centered, skills-based learning platform with offline options.
    Eneza Education – Revision and learning materials for basic feature phones.
    Funzi – Mobile learning service that supports teaching and training for large groups.
    KaiOS – Software that gives smartphone capabilities to inexpensive mobile phones and helps open portals to learning opportunities.
    Ubongo – Uses entertainment, mass media, and the connectivity of mobile devices to deliver localized learning to African families at low cost and scale,available in Kiswahili and English.
    Ustad Mobile – Access and share educational content offline.
    Systems with strong offline functionality

    Kolibri – Learning application to support universal education, available in more than 20 languages.
    Rumie – Education tools and content to enable lifelong learning for underserved communities.
    Ustad Mobile – Access and share educational content offline.

  196. Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Platforms

    Alison – Online courses from experts, available in English, French, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese
    Canvas Network – Course catalogue accessible for free for teachers in order to support lifelong learning and professional development.
    Coursera – Online courses taught by instructors from well-recognized universities and companies.
    European Schoolnet Academy – Free online professional development courses for teachers in English, French, Italian and other European languages.
    EdX – Online courses from leading educational institutions.
    iCourse – Chinese and English language courses for university students.
    Future Learn – Online courses to help learners study, build professional skills and connect with experts.
    Icourses – Chinese language courses for university students.
    TED-Ed Earth School – Online lessons about nature made available continuously during a 5-week period between Earth Day (April 22nd) and World Environment Day (June 5th).
    Udemy – English, Spanish and Portuguese language courses on ICT skills and programming.
    XuetangX – Online courses provided by a collection of universities on different subjects in Chinese and English.

  197. Self-directed learning content

    ABRA – Selection of 33 game-like activities in English and in French to promote reading comprehension and writing skills of early readers.
    British Council – English language learning resources, including games, reading, writing and listening exercises.
    Byju’s – Learning application with large repositories of educational content tailored for different grades and learning levels.
    Code It – Helps children learn basic programming concepts through online courses, live webinars and other kid-friendly material. Available in English and German.
    Code.org – Wide range of coding resources categorized by subject for K12 students offered for free by a non-profit.
    Code Week – List of online resources to teach and learn computer coding, available in all EU languages.
    Discovery Education – Free educational resources and lessons about viruses and outbreaks for different grade levels.
    Duolingo – Application to support language learning. Supports numerous base and target languages.
    Edraak –  A variety of resources for K-12 education in Arabic, targeting students, parents and teachers.
    Facebook Get Digital – Lesson plans, conversation starters, activities, videos and other resources for students to stay connected
    Feed the Monster – Android application in multiple languages to help teach children the fundamentals of reading, available in 48 languages.
    History of Africa – A nine-part BBC documentary series on the history of Africa based on UNESCO’s General History of Africa book collection.
    Geekie – Portuguese language web-based platform that provides personalized educational content using adaptive learning technology.
    Khan Academy – Free online lessons and practice in math, sciences and humanities, as well as free tools for parents and teachers to track student progress. Available in 40+ languages, and aligned to national curriculum for over 10 countries.
    KitKit School – Tablet-based learning suite with a comprehensive curriculum spanning early childhood through early primary levels.
    LabXchange – Curated and user-created digital learning content delivered on an online platform that enables educational and research experiences.
    Madrasa – Resources and online lessons for STEM subjects in Arabic
    Mindspark – Adaptive online tutoring system that helps students practice and learn mathematics.
    Mosoteach – Chinese language application hosting cloud classes.
    Music Crab – Mobile application accessible for music education. 
    OneCourse – Child-focused application to deliver reading, writing and numeracy education.
    Profuturo – Resources in different subject areas for students in English, Spanish, French and Portuguese.
    Polyup  – Learning content to build math and gaining computational thinking skills for students in primary and early secondary school.
    Quizlet – Learning flashcards and games to support learning in multiple subjects, available in 15 languages. 
    SDG Academy Library – A searchable library of more than 1,200 educational videos on sustainable development and related topics.
    Siyavula – Mathematics and physical sciences education aligned with South African curriculum.
    Smart History – Art history site with resources created by historians and academic contributors.
    YouTube – Huge repository of educational videos and learning channels.

  198. Collaboration platforms that support live-video communication

    Dingtalk – Communication platform that supports video conferencing, task and calendar management, attendance tracking and instant messaging.
    Lark – Collaboration suite of interconnected tools, including chat, calendar, creation and cloud storage, in Japanese, Korean, Italian and English
    Hangouts Meet – Video calls integrated with other Google’s G-Suite tools.
    Teams – Chat, meet, call and collaboration features integrated with Microsoft Office software.
    Skype – Video and audio calls with talk, chat and collaboration features.
    WeChat Work – Messaging, content sharing and video/audio-conferencing tool with the possibility of including max. 300 participants, available in English and Chinese.
    WhatsApp – Video and audio calls, messaging and content sharing mobile application.
    Zoom – Cloud platform for video and audio conferencing, collaboration, chat and webinars.

  199. Tools for teachers to create of digital learning content

    Thinglink – Tools to create interactive images, videos and other multimedia resources.
    Buncee – Supports the creation and sharing visual representations of learning content, including media-rich lessons, reports, newsletters and presentations.
    EdPuzzle – Video lesson creation software.
    EduCaixa – Courses in Spanish language to help teachers develop the skills and competencies of learners in areas such as communication, entrepreneurship, STEM and big data. 
    Kaltura – Video management and creation tools with integration options for various learning management systems.
    Nearpod – Software to create lessons with informative and interactive assessment activities.
    Pear Deck – Facilitates the design of engaging instructional content with various integration features.
    Squigl – Content creation platform that transforms speech or text into animated videos.
    Trello – A visual collaboration tool used by teachers and professors for easier coursework planning, faculty collaboration, and classroom organization.

  200. External repositories of distance learning solutions

    Brookings – A catalogue of nearly 3,000 learning innovations. Not all of them are distance learning solutions, but many of them offer digital education content.
    Common Sense Education – Tips and tools to support school closures and transitions to online and at-home learning.
    Commonweatlh of Learning – List of resources for policymakers, school and college administrators, teachers, parents and learners that will assist with student learning during the closure of educational institutions.
    Education Nation – Nordic countries have opened up their learning solutions for the world for free, supporting teachers and learners during the school closures.
    EdSurge – Community-driven list of edtech products, including many distance learning resources for students, teachers and schools, covering primary to post-secondary education levels.
    European Commission Resources – A collection of online platforms for teachers and educators, available in 23 EU languages. 
    GDL Radio: a collection of radio and audio instruction resources.
    Global Business Coalition for Education – List of e-learning platforms, information sharing platform  and communication platforms.
    Keep Learning Going – Extensive collection free tools, strategies, tips and best practices for teaching online from a coalition of USA-based education organizations. Includes descriptions of over 600+ digital learning solutions.
    Koulu.me – A collection of apps and pedagogical solutions curated by Finnish edtech companies to facilitate distance for pre-primary to upper secondary learners.
    Organisation internationale de la Francophonie: Resources for primary and secondary school students and teachers for learning and teaching French.
    Profuturo Resources: Spanish language resources in different subject areas for primary and secondary school students.
    UNEVOC Resources – Tools, guides, MOOCS and other resources collected by UNESCO’s International Centre for Technical and Vocational Education and Training for continued learning in the area of TVET.
    UNHCR – An extensive list of over 600 distance learning solutions from the United Nations agency for refugees.

  201. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    The internet and distant learning
    The widespread use of computers and the internet have made distance learning easier and faster, and today virtual schools and virtual universities deliver full curricula online.

  202. Anonymous

    06.09.2020 · Reply

    The capacity of Internet to support voice, video, text and immersion teaching methods made earlier distinct forms of telephone, videoconferencing, radio, television, and text based education somewhat redundant.

  203. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Educational technology relating to distant learning
    The modern use of electronic educational technology (also called e-learning) facilitates distance learning and independent learning by the extensive use of information and communications technology (ICT),[77] replacing traditional content delivery by postal correspondence.

  204. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Instruction can be synchronous and asynchronous online communication in an interactive learning environment or virtual communities, in lieu of a physical classroom.

  205. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    “The focus is shifted to the education transaction in the form of a virtual community of learners sustainable across time.”

  206. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    One of the most significant issues encountered in the mainstream correspondence model of distance education is the transactional distance, which results from the lack of appropriate communication between learner and teacher.

  207. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    This gap has been observed to become wider if there is no communication between the learner and teacher and has direct implications over the learning process and future endeavors in distance education.

  208. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Distance education providers began to introduce various strategies, techniques, and procedures to increase the amount of interaction between learners and teachers. These measures e.g. more frequent face-to-face tutorials, increased use of information and communication technologies including teleconferencing and the Internet, were designed to close the gap in transactional distance.

  209. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Barriers to effective distance education include obstacles such as domestic distractions and unreliable technology,[90] as well as students’ program costs, adequate contact with teachers and support services, and a need for more experience.

  210. Entrepreneurship for the many” is at present still a vision – but a vision within our grasp.

  211. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Some students attempt to participate in distance education without proper training with the tools needed to be successful in the program.

  212. Appendix Everyone can become an entrepreneur Interview with Professor Muhammad Yunus (Excerpt)116The inequitable distribution of income and wealth and the ever-widening gap between rich and poor are creating a socially explosive situation, a kind of time bomb that could explode at any time. Conventional policies that attempt to redistribute wealth, whether through progressive tax rates, wage policies, or through government or private sector aid programs, have all proven to be unsuitable or insufficient to arrest and reverse the trend towards greater economic disparity

  213. Muhammed Yunus, a professor of economics, has developed a program, which has earned respect throughout the world and been adapted in many countries. His program is to view the poor as potential entrepreneurs, and with the help of micro-loans put them in a position to operate their own micro-enterprises – and, as it turns out, with astounding success. That Yunus was awarded the Nobel PeacePrize for his life’s work attests to the fact that this project is about much more than just improving the economic situation of those involved. Lasting peace will come only when a sustainable response to the problem of the wage and wealth disparity has been found.

  214. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Students must be provided with training opportunities (if needed) on each tool that is used throughout the program. The lack of advanced technology skills can lead to an unsuccessful experience.

  215. 158 Appendix Everyone can become an entrepreneur Interview with Professor Muhammad Yunus (Excerpt)116The inequitable distribution of income and wealth and the ever-widening gap between rich and poor are creating a socially explosive situation, a kind of time bomb that could explode at any time. Conventional policies that attempt to redistribute wealth, whether through progressive tax rates, wage policies, or through government or private sector aid programs, have all proven to be unsuitable or insufficient to arrest and reverse the trend towards greater economic disparity. Muhammed Yunus, a professor of economics, has developed a program, which has earned respect throughout the world and been adapted in many countries. His program is to view the poor as potential entrepreneurs, and with the help of micro-loans put them in a position to operate their own micro-enterprises – and, as it turns out, with astounding success. That Yunus was awarded the Nobel PeacePrize for his life’s work attests to the fact that this project is about much more than just improving the economic situation of those involved. Lasting peace will come only when a sustainable response to the problem of the wage and wealth disparity has been found. Faltin:As economists we know that the cause or centre of unequal income distribution and unequal wealth distribution is due to commercial activity. That’s where the problem starts. Those who are entrepreneurs usually accumulate a lot of money and others don’t. So if you can increase participation in entrepreneurship that would be the decisive point to change society and all the inequality. Yunus: Absolutely. My own feeling is all human beings can by birth become entrepreneurs. It’s rooted in the person itself. But the society we have created doesn’t allow most of the people to bring out the gift they carry inside of them. They don’t know that they possess the entrepreneurial capability. They look at it in a way as “I don’t know what to do. I work for you because I have nothing good to discover inside of me. That’s the point where society goes wrong. Society should encourage everybody to explore the potential they have inside of them. It’s a wonderful gift you have and never unwrapped, never looked at and that’s why you don’t know. That’s where we’re coming from in creating the problem of
    159 inequality because your own thinking has remained little. You have not seen that you’re there. If you were aware of your capabilities, you could contribute those to the society

  216. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Schools have a responsibility to adopt a proactive policy for managing technology barriers.

  217. Faltin:

    But nobody believes that. You say every body possesses the capability to engage in commercial activity, even the ones who are not highly educated and not in the hunting field. Can really everybodybecome an entrepreneur?

    Yunus:

    Yes. Even the beggar woman or the beggar man in the streets of Bangladesh, India or Africa has as much entrepreneurial potential inside as anybody else in the world. They simply have never opened their box to find out that it’s all in there because they never knew that it’s there. Society never allowed, never facilitated unwrapping that gift. In terms of potential we are all equal. Some have discovered or caught a little of that potential, others haven’t

  218. Faltin:

    What about the educational system. Usually we believe that the educational system has to equip people with the aforementioned capabilities and talents.

    Yunus:

    Not only education I would say, rather appropriate education. Some education can give you a wrong mindset. Education can train and prepare yourself to work for somebody. That’s not a good education as regards entrepreneurship. Education should aim at telling the following message to the people: “You could do things on your own”. But if you want as an option to work for somebody else, that’s OK, too. You can do it yourself, you have the capability. Education should also encourage you to think and find your own talents instead of only preparing you for the necessary steps to have a little job in a company. One shouldn’t be prevented from finding out that one could have done something completely different. Education has to be at open ends so that you are aware of your opportunities. Information technology is very important in that regard as well. You have to be able to explore your ownthing instead of only following what is in your textbooks and not what is beyond your textbooks. Information technology does not have a textbook so you have to design your own textbook, what you want to know about yourself, the world, what kind of thing you want to do yourself. Indeed, information technology today comes as a very powerful instrument to discover yourself

  219. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Time management skills and self-discipline in distance education is just as important as complete knowledge of the software and tools being used for learning.

  220. Faltin: All the time we’re busy in turning ourselves into entrepreneurs. What is your advice to us? Where should we start in order to become entrepreneurs in the Western culture?

    Yunus:

    The starting point is only at the personal level and creating institutions, educational opportunities and websites, which can be contacted by the individual people to raise questions such as: “What am I doing here? I could have done this, I could have done that. Why don’t we explore this one a little bit more?” It’s about creating individuals to be themselves, discover themselves and explore themselves. That spirit of exploring oneself is the most important act. Of all the things we can do to help becoming entrepreneurs, this is the best thing we can all do

  221. When even Muslim women living under the most extreme social conditions in a severely underdeveloped country can successfully become entrepreneurs, we would expect that this is possible here in this country under infinitely more favorable conditions. Not just for the negligible number of people who have established businesses in this country up until now, but for as many people as possible

  222. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    The results of a study of Washington state community college students showed that distance learning students tended to drop out more often than their traditional counterparts due to difficulties in language, time management, and study skills.

  223. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    According to Dr. Pankaj Singhm, director of Nims University, “distance learning benefits may outweigh the disadvantages for students in such a technology-driven society; however, before indulging into the use of educational technology a few more disadvantages should be considered.”

  224. If all my comments are consider and comply

    Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    Became a reality

    Guten Abend to All 2020 Contestants

  225. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    He describes that over multiple years, “all of the obstacles have been overcome and the world environment for distance education continues to improve.”

  226. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Dr. Pankaj Singhm also claims there is a debate to distance education stating, “due to a lack of direct face-to-face social interaction.

  227. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    However, as more people become used to personal and social interaction online (for example dating, chat rooms, shopping, or blogging), it is becoming easier for learners to both project themselves and socializes with others. This is an obstacle that has dissipated.

  228. I believe that one way to bridge the gap of educational distance is to ensure Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4 is accomplished.
    What are the developmental goals?
    The Sustainable Development Goals are the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. They address the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, peace and justice.
    What is the goal of quality education?
    This goal ensures that all girls and boys complete free primary and secondary schooling by 2030. It also aims to provide equal access to affordable vocational training, and to eliminate gender and wealth disparities with the aim of achieving universal access to a quality higher education.
    Why is SDG 4 Important?
    Ensuring quality and inclusive education for all and promoting lifelong learning is the Sustainable Development Goal 4 of the United Nations’ new SDG 2030 agenda as was set by international leaders during the September global summit.
    What is the role of education in SDG 2030?
    Education is a human right and a force for sustainable development and peace. Every goal in the 2030 Agenda requires education to empower people with the knowledge, skills and values to live in dignity, build their lives and contribute to their societies.

  229. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Not all courses required to complete a degree may be offered online. Health care profession programs, in particular, require some sort of patient interaction through fieldwork before a student may graduate.

  230. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Studies have also shown that students pursuing a medical professional graduate degree who are participating in distance education courses, favor a face to face communication over professor-mediated chat rooms and/or independent studies. However, this is little correlation between student performance when comparing the previous different distance learning strategies.

  231. Goal 4: Quality education
    This goal ensures that all girls and boys complete free primary and secondary schooling by 2030. It also aims to provide equal access to affordable vocational training, to eliminate gender and wealth disparities, and achieve universal access to a quality higher education

  232. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    There is a theoretical problem with the application of traditional teaching methods to online courses because online courses may have no upper size limit. Daniel Barwick noted that there is no evidence that large class size is always worse or that small class size is always better, although a negative link has been established between certain types of instruction in large classes and learning outcomes; he argued that higher education has not made a sufficient effort to experiment with a variety of instructional methods to determine whether the large class size is always negatively correlated with a reduction in learning outcomes.[96] Early proponents of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC)s saw them as just the type of experiment that Barwick had pointed out was lacking in higher education, although Barwick himself has never advocated for MOOCs.

  233. There may also be institutional challenges. Distance learning is new enough that it may be a challenge to gain support for these programs in a traditional brick-and-mortar academic learning environment.[66] Furthermore, it may be more difficult for the instructor to organize and plan a distance learning program,[69] especially since many are new programs and their organizational needs are different from a traditional learning program.

  234. Additionally, though distance education offers industrial countries the opportunity to become globally informed, there are still negative sides to it.

  235. Hellman states that “These include its cost and capital intensiveness, time constraints and other pressures on instructors, the isolation of students from instructors and their peers, instructors’ enormous difficulty in adequately evaluating students they never meet face-to-face, and drop-out rates far higher than in classroom-based courses.”

  236. A more complex challenge of distance education relates to cultural differences between students and teachers and among students. Distance programs tend to be more diverse as they could go beyond the geographical borders of regions, countries, and continents, and cross the cultural borders that may exist with respect to race, gender, and religion. That requires a proper understanding and awareness of the norms, differences, preconceptions, and potential conflicting issues.

  237. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Distance education is becoming absolutely popular in these days, and many students are also choosing it.

  238. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Even though, Correspondence courses do exist right now, they are drastically been replaced by online courses, which offers you with the guideline from teachers, forum for conveying your feedback, and also for interacting with fellow students.

  239. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Teaching and learning in primary schools should enhance MDG-related skills, knowledge and behaviour. … School feeding programmes, such as those introduced in many countries, can directly improve nutritional status. Schools can provide the space for promoting gender equality and empowerment broadly across society.

  240. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Distance education is usually used in case if you wish to continue your education but lacks good institution and thus helps you in completing your education from your home and you can also choose the course based on your own choice.

  241. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    The definition of distance education states that it’s actually a way of educating the students by employing the electronic means of communication. The communication between students, faculty is generally carried via email, instant messaging, forums via electronic means.

  242. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    What are the objectives of MDGs?
    Millennium Development Goals (MDGs): To eradicate extreme poverty and hunger. To achieve universal primary education. To promote gender equality. To reduce child mortality.

  243. Anonymous

    07.09.2020 · Reply

    Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and their relevance to higher education in Kosovo

    SERHATI, Jehona
    Jehona Serhati of the University of Kassel, analyzes the mutual interdependence between higher education and the MDG’s in Kosovo. Analyzing the current situation of the MDG’s in that country, the author makes a call to the government for further involving the University of Prishtina as a fundamental pillar for the achievement of MDG’s.

    Introduction
    Due to the political situation in the Balkans, Kosovo, and other countries in the region, are lagging behind other European countries with factual and developmental data. Nevertheless, the presence of international organizations after the war has aided in the building of a basic and applied research system, through project expertise and financing .The role of higher education institutions is of crucial and everlasting importance to Kosovo, particularly in research conduction. The history and challenging times of the then only public Albanian controlled University in Kosovo -the University of Prishtina and its tough resistance during different political “high tides and low tides” are some of the features that make this institution the ambassador of national goals of this country.

    The role of international and supra-national organizations to the implementation of Millennium Development Goals has proved essential. However, the role of higher education (HE) to MDGs’ progress is still obscure as no analyses or studies have been carried out so far. In the context of some meta-analytic research of various reports commissioned by public and international organizations and institutions, this research paper will seek to shed light to the particular role of HE to MDGs and vice-versa. The focus of this article is placed on the role of academia as a catalyst towards accelerating the process of achieving the MDGs. The latest factsheet on MDGs in Kosovo issued by United Nations Kosovo Team serves as a reference point for addressing each goal’s progress and shortfalls.

    Although MDGs are interconnected and the malfunction of one of them can affect all others like a chain reaction, the most vulnerable and elusive goals in Kosovo are examined in this paper: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger (Goal 1), Achieve Universal Primary Education (Goal 2), Reduce Child Mortality and Improve Maternal Health. The following sections will further explain why. The goal for promoting gender equality and empowering women is presented as a success story of all actors involved in its attainment: government, civil society and higher education – University of Prishtina.

    Some background to higher education in Kosovo
    After the war, Kosovo was administered by the United Nations Interim Administration in Kosovo (UNMIK). In February 17th, 2008 Kosovo was declared independent and is now recognized as a sovereign state by 75 UN countries. As of 2008 Kosovo has a new constitution and is de facto under the governance of the Republic of Kosovo. EULEX – the Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo – is responsible for monitoring, mentoring and advising Kosovo police, judiciary and customary authorities.

    Two parallel public higher education institutions function in Kosovo: the Albanian controlled University of Prishtina and the Serbian controlled University of northern Mitrovica, which is considered an illegal institution by the Kosovo Ministry of Education (Tahirsylaj, 2008). The unstable political climate which has its roots in the old conflict between the two ethnicities that live in Kosovo (Albanians and Serbs), also hinders cooperation between the two universities. The Ministry of Education, Science and Technology did not have access to the University of Mitrovica and, thus, the strategy of the development of higher education from 2005-2015 does not include any information on this institution (Tahirsylaj, 2008). Therefore, this paper will focus on the role and the relevance of Millennium Development Goals to the University of Prishtina and vice-versa.

    And now some history on MDGs in Kosovo
    After years of isolation Kosovo welcomed the MDGs as they overlapped with the national re-building and development agenda. However, when representatives from 192 United Nations member states gathered together and signed a declaration to establish a timeframe for achieving eight international goals by 2015, Kosovo representatives were not present due to the country’s undefined status and, thus, did not sign the declaration (UNDP, 2010). Nevertheless, the goals that arose from this meeting were of fundamental importance to Kosovo’s national development.

    To help Kosovo’s self-governing institutions utilize these goals for improving human development and ensuring integration into the global efforts, the United Nations Kosovo Team prepared a baseline MDG Report in 2004 specifically for Kosovo entitled “Where will we be in 2015?”. The report aimed at tracking Kosovo’s status in all sectors related to the MDGs. The MDG Factsheet 2010 is now issued by United Nations Kosovo Team (UNKT) and is used as a reference point in this article. The measuring, monitoring and reporting of progress on the MDGs in Kosovo are the main highlights. In 2008 the Assembly of Kosovo endorsed the Millennium Declaration and affirmed institutional commitment to meet the MDGs by 2015 (UNDP, 2010).

    Review of progress and shortfalls of Millennium Development Goals in Kosovo
    Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
    Eradicating extreme poverty and reducing relative poverty are two of the most challenging goals in Kosovo thus far. The newest UNKT (2010) data shows that 45% of the population lives in poverty and 16.7% in extreme poverty.

    Source: SOK (2008 – 2009), UNDP (2007), UNICEF 2009

    These are individuals who live with under € 43/month (UNKT, 2010).Consequently, Kosovo is considered to have the poorest society in the Western Balkans (UNKT, 2008). Thus, halving the poverty rate is the most challenging goal for Kosovo, which has languished behind this target 11 years after the conflict and 3 years since its independence. The rural area – where the majority of Kosovars live – face the greatest difficulties in achieving this goal. As indicated in reports by the World Bank and UNDP, absolute poverty dropped in 2002 but dramatically increased in 2004 throughout 2006. Absolute poverty has been successfully halved in urban areas but is still a problem in rural areas where poverty has, in fact, increased.

    Source: UNDP (2007)

    Failure to achieve this goal has impact on the rest of the chain from the top to bottom; eradicating poverty has the potential to accelerate the completion of other MDGs if properly handled. Reasons for the current predicament mainly stem from side effects of the conflict, such as loss of property due to destruction and displacement. Approximately 27% ( or 120,000)of the housing stock in Kosovo was damaged. Trepca mining complex, the largest industrial site in Kosovo, was closed down due to the continuing tensioned political situation between the Kosovo Serbs and Kosovo Albanian. During the 1980s this complex employed “20,000 workers and accounted for 70 percent of all Yugoslavia’s mineral wealth” (Stuart, 2002). Other manufactories were either burned or closed down due to cases of corruption. Further, the poor infrastructure and rural-urban migration has put the sustainable rural development in jeopardy. Such sustainable measures would translate to agricultural development, which can be a very “fertile” source for improving a national economy.

    What is the role of higher education in this context? Research carried out by the National Agricultural Research System (NARS) of Kosovo, composed of the Kosovo Institute of Agriculture (KIA) and the Faculty of Agriculture, shows that there is only applied research conducted by KIA and UP (KIA, n.d). One of the major issues cited by KIA in failing to conduct basic research is the lack of resources (i.e. scientists who have left the country; research facilities; staff skills and knowledge of new agricultural research techniques and technology) that were destroyed during the conflict. With over 60 percent of Kosovo’s population engaged in some form of agriculture, this sector would accommodate a wide range of the country’s labour force and production if it functioned properly. Presently, Kosovo has the highest unemployment rate in Europe (at approximately 45.5%). The fact that Kosovo has little to no capacities to foster new jobs for the ever-growing number of people entering the world of work (the average in Kosovo is 25) leaves the country in a precarious state. The KIA’s challenge to progress is only one example that shows the lack of resources in the field of agriculture among many others.

    Achieve Universal Primary Education
    Achieving universal primary education has been a formidable challenge for Kosovo. After the conflict, schools were destroyed. However, international development aid was of greatest help in re-building school infrastructure. Integrative education for all minorities in Kosovo was one of the priorities of education reforms. With high primary school participation rates (95.9% of Kosovo Albanians and 94% of Kosovo Serbs), Kosovo fares well compared to others, but the biggest concern comes from Roma, Ashkali Egyptian (RAE) community, whose primary education participation rate is 75.7% and children with special needs whose participation is only 12.1% (UNDP, 2002). School participation becomes even more concerning at higher levels of education. The higher the education level, the lower the participation (UNDP, 2002).

    Rural areas face the biggest challenge to continue education. In the academic year 1999/2001, the total percentage of primary education was approximately 73%, but this percentage has increased to 95.44% by 2005, though the drop-out rate remains very high – 19% for both genders (UNDP, 2002). This figure is highly affected in the 9th grade, which is part of the primary education according to the reformed education system entered into force after 2002. This “breakthrough” grade between primary and lower secondary education is mostly not offered at the same schools where other levels are provided. Instead, it is offered in other locations and – for those living in villages – this turns out to be a burden as there are no secondary schools in rural areas (UNICEF, 2003). Thus, all the additional expenses that families must provide for educating their children become huge barriers for rural development. Further, the lack of qualified teaching and management adds to the central problems that face the Kosovo primary education system.

    Source: UNKT (2010)

    How is the situation in higher levels of education?
    The number of enrolments at the University of Prishtina has increased over the years but the biggest challenge is the mismatch between the increased demand by prospective students and the low supply. Interest among first year applicants at the University of Prishtina rapidly increased in the academic year 2007/2008 (SOK, 2009). 19185 students enrolled for the first time during this academic year. The trend of university enrolments has raised other uncertainties in UP: overcrowded amphitheatres (BIRN, 2009). The insufficient conditions to fulfil the lowest criteria for a teaching and learning environment and lack of professors in certain faculties (BIRN, 2009) are also identified as major problems this university faces. The role of higher education institutions in training and producing professional teachers required for primary and secondary education is imperative and it shows once again the interrelation among all levels of education. A university graduate would sooner or later become a potential teacher/professor or trainer of the future generations.

    Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women
    This goal is considered to be one of the most successful MDGs in Kosovo (UNICEF, 2003). The active involvement and mechanisms undertaken by the government came as a result of pressure from international actors in Kosovo and the local NGOs highly committed to women’s rights. The 30% quota in Parliament makes the representation of women in the Assembly of Kosovo the second highest in the region. However, women are underrepresented in the labour market. Data show that only 12% of women out of 28.4% registered in the labour force have permanent full-time work (UNKT, 2010). Women’s involvement in primary education is almost equal to that of men.

    What is the contribution of the UP to this goal? The Gender Equality Office, established in 2007 by the University of Prishtina, seeks to promote women in academia alongside with gender equality and equity in the university. Some of the objectives of this office are: mainstream of gender equality and prevention of gender discrimination within the University, research conduction with the aim to generate knowledge on gender issues, and promotion and awareness increase about gender equality not only within academic settings but also outside, among the overall society. It is not stated in the mission of this office whether its general aim is related to MDGs or not, but it is clearly highly contributing to their attainment. What has been so crucial to this goal is the involvement of many sectors and actors; therefore the UP has a fundamental role in this goal.

    Reduce Child Mortality and Improve Maternal Health
    There are slight improvements in these goals’ achievements, but the health sector remains one of the most endangered public service sectors in Kosovo (UNKT, 2010). The lack of capacities in the public hospital, which meantime hosts all the departments of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Prishtina, is a result of misuse, fraud and corruption. Financial support has been provided by different international donors in addressing the needs of public hospitals, but very often the resources have disappeared and never reached out to those in need.

    Source: UNKT, 2010

    The quality and access to antenatal care is one of the most unsatisfactory services offered by public hospitals in Kosovo. The recent data (UNDP, 2009) demonstrate an increase in the number of reported maternal deaths and maternal mortality rate – 43.3 mothers die in 100,000 births. The same troubling rates exist for child care whereby Kosovo with a very high under-five mortality rate – 69 per 1,000 live births (DHS 2003, SOK) as compared to other European countries is considered to have the poorest status in child health (UNKT, 2010). The limited knowledge of women’s health, the government’s low spending on health (specifically for maternal and child health care) and poor quality of data are considered as some of the main hindrances to these two goals. What is the role and potential contribution of the Medical Faculty of the University of Prishtina in attaining these goals? Several activities in which HE institutions can assist with these goals are suggested by international scholars (Mohamedbhai, 2008). Educating mothers about childcare can help reduce the under 5-mortality in many countries, in particular developing countries. The role of HE institutions in this respect is vital by reaching out to target populations through various forms of non-formal education programs organized by faculties and departments of social work. Students of Faculty of Medicine can provide immunization programs through Ministries of Health. Training nurses, midwives, offering skilled attendance during childbirth and introducing family planning as part of HE curricula are some of the programs that can help reduce maternal mortality. Notwithstanding austerity measures and lack of resources, academia in the Faculty of Medicine in Kosovo is engaged on individual basis in some scientific research though limited. Research is a panacea that could shed light on the underestimated issues that are rooted in larger concerns of the country. Nevertheless public HE in Kosovo is financed by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, thus the final decision for funding is not in the University’s hands.

    Conclusion
    History of the University of Prishtina is a splendid example for highlighting the challenges and decision-making an institution can face in tumultuous times. The commitment and efforts of the University of Prishtina to MDGs, although not direct are apparently more effective and progress-oriented than those of the government. It is important for the government to realize the role of universities and give them more autonomy and freedom to lead. Given the research being undertaken by academia, the management of the University of Prishtina should acknowledge their capacities and recognize academic work and provide more space to generate knowledge inside the university and disseminate it to society. Like many other economically under-developed countries, corruption is no stranger in Kosovo’s public institutions, which is certainly curtailing overall development.

    Accelerating progress in MDGs will depend on the policies that Kosovo’s government will endorse together with the help of academia, civil society and international organizations. Distribution of responsibilities to HE would complement the role of government and would increase the level of commitment. Guidance and inception of legislation are some of the responsibilities that could be spearheaded by higher education to ease government’s pain (Sahatciu, 2010). At a time of financial crisis, when countries around the world are cutting HE budgets, Kosovo will undoubtedly follow suit. Therefore, it is important to use existing capacities and “do more with less” to achieve effective and efficient results at a time of greater demand with fewer resources.

  244. While many children in cities have been able to attend classes online, those in place like villages , where telecom networks are poor and power supply is often erratic, have gone months without opening schoolbooks.

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  245. Parents, who hope for better lives for their children, are pushing them to attend the mobile classes.

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  246. Some students were taking classes online, while others couldn’t. So the government scrapped the school year for all. But the move may just make educational inequality worse.

  247. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    When I reflect critically reflect on the above article , as a serial entrepreneur, only one thing came upon my life, and that is the words of Annita Roddick, that says “Skill is not the answer, neither is money. what you need is optimism.

    Campus members 2020 and co contestants do we agree?

  248. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    When I reflect critically reflect on the above article , as a serial entrepreneur, only one thing came upon my life, and that is the words of Annita Roddick, that says “Skill is not the answer, neither is money. what you need is humanism.

    Campus members 2020 and co contestants do we agree?

  249. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    When I reflect critically reflect on the above article , as a serial entrepreneur, only one thing came upon my life, and that is the words of Annita Roddick, that says “Skill is not the answer, neither is money. what you need is enthusiasm

    Campus members 2020 and co contestants do we agree?

  250. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    When I reflect critically reflect on the above article , as a serial entrepreneur, only one thing came upon my life, and that is the words of Annita Roddick, that says “Skill is not the answer, neither is money. what you need is intuition.
    Campus members 2020 and co contestants do we agree?

  251. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    When I reflect critically reflect on the above article , as a serial entrepreneur, only one thing came upon my life, and that is the words of Annita Roddick, that says “Skill is not the answer, neither is money. what you need is curiosity.
    Campus members 2020 and co contestants do we agree?

  252. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    When I reflect critically reflect on the above article , as a serial entrepreneur, only one thing came upon my life, and that is the words of Annita Roddick, that says “Skill is not the answer, neither is money. what you need is love

    Campus members 2020 and co contestants do we agree?

  253. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    When I reflect critically reflect on the above article , as a serial entrepreneur, only one thing came upon my life, and that is the words of Annita Roddick, that says “Skill is not the answer, neither is money. what you need is humor

    Campus members 2020 and co contestants do we agree?

  254. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    When I reflect critically reflect on the above article , as a serial entrepreneur, only one thing came upon my life, and that is the words of Annita Roddick, that says “Skill is not the answer, neither is money. what you need is magic.

    Campus members 2020 and co contestants do we agree?

  255. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    When I reflect critically reflect on the above article , as a serial entrepreneur, only one thing came upon my life, and that is the words of Annita Roddick, that says “Skill is not the answer, neither is money. what you need is fun.

    Campus members 2020 and co contestants do we agree?

  256. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap

    When I reflect critically reflect on the above article , as a serial entrepreneur, only one thing came upon my life, and that is the words of Annita Roddick, that says “Skill is not the answer, neither is money. what you need is secret ingredient euphoria
    Campus members 2020 and co contestants do we agree?

  257. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Distance learning, also called distance education, e-learning, and online learning, form of education in which the main elements include physical separation of teachers and students during instruction and the use of various technologies to facilitate student-teacher and student-student communication. Distance learning traditionally has focused on nontraditional students, such as full-time workers, military personnel, and nonresidents or individuals in remote regions who are unable to attend classroom lectures. However, distance learning has become an established part of the educational world, with trends pointing to ongoing growth. In U.S. higher education alone, more than 5.6 million university students were enrolled in at least one online course in the autumn of 2009, up from 1.6 million in 2002.

  258. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    An increasing number of universities provide distance learning opportunities. A pioneer in the field is the University of Phoenix, which was founded in Arizona in 1976 and by the first decade of the 21st century had become the largest private school in the world, with more than 400,000 enrolled students. It was one of the earliest adopters of distance learning technology, although many of its students spend some time in classrooms on one of its dozens of campuses in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. A precise figure for the international enrollment in distance learning is unavailable, but the enrollment at two of the largest public universities that heavily utilize distance learning methods gives some indication: in the early 21st century the Indira Gandhi National Open University, headquartered in New Delhi, had an enrollment in excess of 1.5 million students, and the China Central Radio and TV University, headquartered in Beijing, had more than 500,000 students.

  259. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Students and institutions embrace distance learning with good reason. Universities benefit by adding students without having to construct classrooms and housing, and students reap the advantages of being able to work where and when they choose. Public-school systems offer specialty courses such as small-enrollment languages and Advanced Placement classes without having to set up multiple classrooms. In addition, homeschooled students gain access to centralized instruction.

  260. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Characteristics of distance learning

    Various terms have been used to describe the phenomenon of distance learning. Strictly speaking, distance learning (the student’s activity) and distance teaching (the teacher’s activity) together make up distance education. Common variations include e-learning or online learning, used when the Internet is the medium; virtual learning, which usually refers to courses taken outside a classroom by primary- or secondary-school pupils (and also typically using the Internet); correspondence education, the long-standing method in which individual instruction is conducted by mail; and open learning, the system common in Europe for learning through the “open” university

  261. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Four characteristics distinguish distance learning. First, distance learning is by definition carried out through institutions; it is not self-study or a nonacademic learning environment. The institutions may or may not offer traditional classroom-based instruction as well, but they are eligible for accreditation by the same agencies as those employing traditional methods.

  262. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Dear members, take this as a case of study:
    By Matt Rivers, Karol Suarez and Natalie Gallón, CNN
    Updated 2036 GMT (0436 HKT) August 27, 2020

    At the Benito Juárez elementary school in the community of Ahuelicán at Guerrero state, Mexico, cleaning days are organized by parents while they wait for classes to resume.
    Mexico City (CNN)The Jiménez family have their morning routine down to a science. Or at least, they used to.

    Get up early, shower, and sit at the table for a quick desayuno of bread with jam, some cookies, and either coffee or tea for the grownups. “I miss this, the waking up routine, always in a rush,” said Mariana Yoko Jiménez Arzate, resident mom and conductor of this early morning orchestra, knowing that this year will be different.
    The normal post-breakfast step is a mad dash to school a few blocks away. But the 2020 version of that dash will end just 10 feet away, in the living room of the apartment in Mexico City’s Moctezuma neighborhood. That’s where both Jiménez kids will do most of their learning this semester — by watching TV.
    “It’s good we’re still having class,” said Mariana’s 12-year-old daughter Giselle. “But I’m sad because I was going to start high school and meet new people.”

    The Jiménez family and friends at home.
    The great educational dilemma
    Mexico’s government won’t allow in-person classes this year, which means Mexico’s 30 million students will all be forced to learn remotely.
    Officials say the coronavirus pandemic — which has claimed roughly 60,000 lives amid more than 550,000 confirmed cases — is still too dangerous to allow kids back in the classroom.

    Protests across Latin America reflect a toxic cocktail of pandemic and recession
    Remote learning is difficult even in developed countries. But in places like Mexico, taking that English or math class online isn’t so easy — only 56% of households have access to the internet, according to government statistics.
    So if the law requires all Mexican kids to be offered a public education, the government has decided the best way to do that is over the airwaves, with 93% of households having a television.
    Lights, camera … classes
    Inside a brightly lit studio at Mexico City TV station Channel 11 last week, fifth grade teacher Omar Morales squinted as a young man with bright purple hair applied makeup to his face.
    “Ok, this is your floor director,” a producer told him. “She is your eyes and ears out here, listen to what she tells you, look at the camera she tells you to look at and you’ll be fine.”
    This time last year, Morales was just a public school teacher setting up his classroom, getting ready to hug his kids on their first day of school.
    Now, part actor, part teacher, he practiced delivering a lesson plan about the elements of sound that will eventually be watched by millions.
    “It’s challenging,” he says modestly. “It’s no longer 40 kids in a class where I know their names, passions, their favorite games. Here, I’m locked in a set, but I know there’s millions of kids out there who still need that knowledge.”
    Morales is part of an ambitious government plan to record a comprehensive set of lessons for all grade levels pre-K through high school and then broadcast them on TV.
    It has worked out agreements with different TV channels to broadcast that content, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, with different grade levels at different hours.

    Omar Morales, right, part actor, part teacher, practices delivering a lesson plan about the elements of sound that will eventually be watched by millions.
    The government will also use radio programs to reach kids with no TV or internet, the majority of which the government says live in remote indigenous communities.
    “There is no precedent for something this big,” said Rodolfo Lara Ponte, who runs the radio education program during the pandemic.
    “We have planned to have 640 programs, across 18 radio stations in 15 states of the country,” he said, adding many are recorded in indigenous languages unique to different regions.
    For now, both the TV and radio programs will run through December but everything is subject to change based on how the pandemic plays out here over the next several months.
    Government officials overseeing the program uniformly say the goal is to get kids back in the classroom as soon as possible, but for now, they say they’re doing their best.
    “It was a tough decision not to reopen schools,” said Maria Meléndez, the ministry’s Director of Curriculum Development. “But by doing the TV and radio classes, that means not letting the education gap get wider.”
    Mind the gap
    “Education gap” is a polite way of saying that rich kids often get better educations than poor kids.
    This was a problem in Mexico even before the coronavirus forced schools to close in March. For example, relatively wealthy Mexico City saw a 92% secondary, or high-school level, education enrollment rate as of 2019. In the much poorer state of Chiapas, that rate stood at only 59%.
    But the pandemic could exacerbate what was already an acute problem — and television and radio can’t solve underlying disparities.
    You don’t need to be an education expert to conclude that wealthier students with internet access and the ability to interact with a teacher, even remotely, might fare better than those who get their classes the same way they watch cartoons.

    Teachers’ unions are leading the push for more coronavirus protections at schools
    “Their only learning this year will be what they get from a TV,” said Erandi Jacobo Martínez, a public school teacher in Coyoacán, a charming southern barrio in Mexico City. “And if they have any questions, our ability to help will be really limited.”
    Another issue is evaluation. The Ministry of Education says it’s devaluing quantifying student progress for the moment, not only because it’s difficult to do but because of the added stress it could place on students.
    “Talking about evaluations is ambitious and I think it’s not where we are right now,” said Meléndez. “When kids return to school, they will be evaluated for what they’ve learned.”
    In the meantime, the burden on parents, already high during any normal school year, will dramatically increase this year. If kids are going to make progress, parents in the home will be the primary driving force.
    “If we cannot see them, we have to trust in the parents that they share with us about their kids and what they’re working on,” said Martínez.
    ‘You have to adapt’
    Mariana, the single mom who works from home, says she is ready for the challenge. She’s even prepared daily schedules for her daughter, 12-year-old Giselle, and for her neighbors’ two young daughters, Tania, 6, and Fatima, 9.
    “It has to work,” she told us over a steaming cup of green tea. “You can’t ever compare this to in-person classes but we need to give our all. We need to adapt.”
    Tania and Fatima agree — mostly. We asked them what they’d miss about not going to school.
    “My friends,” said Tania. “And my teacher.”
    For kids, there are some things even a little extra TV time can’t fix.

    • Anonymous

      08.09.2020 · Reply

      Mexico’s solution to the COVID – 19 educational crisis: put school on television.

  263. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    What Is Distance Learning?
    Merriam Webster defines distance learning as, “a method of study where teachers and students do not meet in a classroom but use the Internet, e-mail, mail, etc., to have classes.”

  264. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Simply put, distance learning is when students are separated from teachers and peers. This means that students learn remotely and do not have face-to-face learning with instructors or other students.

  265. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    What’s The Difference Between Online Learning And Distance Learning?
    1. Location

    Online learning can include the use of online tools and platforms while still being in a regular classroom setting. Distance learning, however, is remote and does not include any face-to-face interaction between student and teacher.

  266. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    2. Interaction
    Online learning, as seen above, can include interaction with teachers and peers, whereas distance learning does not have in-person interactions.

  267. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    3. Intention

    Online learning can be used as a supplement for teachers in their courses, while distance learning replaces teachers with instruction that is pre-set on the learning platform.

  268. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    What Is Online Learning?
    Online learning is when teachers or students use educational tools which are accessible on the internet.

  269. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    This means that students can also use online tools while they are physically in a classroom with their teacher and peers. Online learning can be used anywhere and anytime, so teachers may have students using them as tools in class or for preparation and assignments at home.

  270. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Online learning tools are often used to create blended learning environments in the classroom. This helps keep students engaged in the class and in the material.

  271. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Online learning also helps teachers save preparation time before class. With the help of online educational tools, teachers can spend more time grading papers, giving one-on-one attention to students, and maybe even getting some free time for themselves in their busy work schedule.

  272. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    What Is Distance Education?
    Distance learning does not include any in-person interaction with an instructor or study peers. Students study at home on their own, and the learning is more individual and varies on speed and timeline according to each individual student and their availability.

  273. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Distance learning actually relies on the educational tools of online learning, and that is probably why there is some confusion between the two. It is possible to study with online distance learning as well. In that sense, distance learning is a subset of online learning.

  274. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Because distance education is remote, it can connect students to universities worldwide, making it more accessible for students in different countries. It is also known to be more affordable, which is another factor that helps make education more accessible to many students around the world and in different socio-economic levels.

  275. Distant Learning, How to Bridge the Gap
    Organization of radio lessons: e.g in Nepal
    NEPALESE CHILDREN IN LOCKDOWN
    Alongside partners, Plan International Nepal is offering radio schooling for children unable to go to school due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    A teacher running a radio class in Banke, Nepal.
    Niruta from Western Nepal is no stranger to listening to the radio. However, she thought it was for listening to music and being entertained.

    Since the COVID-19 outbreak, she not only uses the radio to listen to songs but to learn as well. In the ninth grade at school, Niruta now tunes in each day to study. Her school has been closed since March due to lockdown in Nepal.

    She says, “The radio class is useful for us. It creates a learning environment. I listen to the classes.”

    Due to the COVID-19 crisis, all schools are closed in Nepal keeping around 7 million children at home. It is not yet known when they will be open again.

    To ensure children don’t miss out on an education when they can’t physically be in school, Plan International Nepal is running radio classes in Banke, West Nepal. Local radio station Krishnasar broadcasts the classes for 2 hours, 5 days per week.

    ALTERNATIVE LEARNING
    Radio schooling is an alternative approach to deliver lessons on a range of different topics. The teacher prepares a weekly lesson plan for different grades.

    Prativa Sharma, a primary teacher who conducts radio classes said, “This is a good opportunity to continue learning for students in the crisis.
    “We are focused on how we can make the classes effective as this is a new way of teaching children.” 

    She said that radio classes are extra useful to the students as they have found ways for the children to ask their teacher questions.

    Purnima, a seventh-grade student is enjoying the class too. She says, “I tune in to the radio for learning. It remined me of some good stories too.”

    Plan International Nepal has collaborated with Save the Children and the local government to provide the radio schooling programme. The local government offices are also working to make parents and students aware about the radio classes in their communities so school children can listen and learn.

  276. The radio is a new branch of human endeavor which the English teacher must carefully study that he can guide his pupils toward an intelligent selection of the best in current broadcasting. He must realize the principles and concept in order to make teaching apt.
    Journal Information

    The English Journal is a journal of ideas for English language arts teachers in junior and senior high schools and middle schools. EJ presents information on the teaching of writing and reading, literature, and language. Each issue examines the relationship of theory and research to classroom practice, and reviews current materials of interest to English teachers, including books and electronic media. The journal is published bimonthly in September, November, January, March, May, and July.
    The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), a not-for-profit professional association of educators, is dedicated to improving the teaching and learning of English and the language arts at all levels of education. Since 1911, NCTE has provided a forum for the profession, an array of opportunities for teachers to continue their professional growth throughout their careers, and a framework for cooperation to deal with issues that affect the teaching of English. For more information, please visit http://www.ncte.org.

  277. The Benefits Of Distance Learning
    As mentioned above, students can study from universities around the world, even if they are not able to travel to their preferred program. This allows top universities to be available to students who would not otherwise be able to attend due to distance, finances, or other circumstances.

  278. Distance learning is extremely important for those who cannot attend programs due to health complications, severe social anxiety, busy work schedules or parenting demands, or any other situations which make it necessary to be confined to the home.

  279. Online programs, such as University of the People, cater to students who prefer or need distance education. UoPeople is a tuition-free nonprofit institution, making it an affordable and sustainable option for students worldwide. In addition to being affordable, University of the People employs academic leadership from renowned universities around the world, allowing equal opportunity for students to access quality education.

  280. UoPeople provides distance education for students who may have physical or health restrictions, those who live in remote areas, or those who cannot otherwise attend school due to late work hours or raising a family. This provides an equal opportunity for people to access higher education despite restrictions or location.

  281. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    Types Of Distance Learning
    1. Online courses

    Online courses are usually offered as additional classes in traditional degrees. As long as students have computer and internet access, they can learn and receive instruction at home.

  282. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    2. Hybrid courses
    Hybrid courses combine traditional classroom settings with online learning at home. This can mean that students learn individually at home and meet up for in-person instructions or lectures at certain intervals during the course. The amount of at-home learning and in-class learning varies for each hybrid course.

  283. Anonymous

    08.09.2020 · Reply

    3. Conference classes

    Conferencing allows students and teachers to meet up for class in real time, whether in a group or one-on-one with an instructor. Using the phone or video chatting, such as Skype, students and teachers can engage in live lessons despite distance.

    4. Correspondence courses

    Correspondence courses consist of students engaging in class material via mail or email. Students receive material and assignments through mail, and they send completed assignments back through the same method.

    What Works Best For You?
    Now that you have a rundown of the distance learning definition, and the different kinds that are available, you can decide whether it’s a right fit for you and your life. Many students find distance learning to be a fulfilling and practical way to receive quality education, without needing to attend a traditional university.

    Whether you’re looking for a program that will allow you to work or raise a family, or whether you might have a condition that keeps you at home most of the time, distance learning can be a great way to learn valuable knowledge and tools for your future.

  284. Shedrach aifuwa

    28.09.2020 · Reply

    For my country, Nigeria. University and college education is still on hold, but primary and secondary education Is back, though not a 100% but states are beginning to give a go ahead to that. With regards to e-learning, there’s still a wide gap between the rich and poor as well as those who can first have access to data and also those who can ably afford it. I would strongly stand for the media broadcast as that has a wider reach to both the extremely poor, poor, middle class and the rich.

  285. The pandemic has definitely impacted each and every one of us in different ways. I really feel for all the kids who are missing out on school life.

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