How to Build Peace through Entrepreneurship

Social entrepreneurship is a practical way to build peace in local communities and in the world. One of its main advantages is the inclusion of young people in creating a safer, securer, and healthier world. At the same time, it provides an opportunity for every person, no matter what their age is, to get their voices heard.
The sure thing is that the vision of peace shared by heads of states, politicians, diplomats, scholars, and common people who have always been living in the absence of war and conflict differs from the vision of those living under the stress of war and all its outcomes.
Those who have gone through difficult phases in their lives because of conflict due to wars or even climate-related reasons have a clear vision of how a peaceful world should be. At the same time, they have the desire to live in a conflict-free world. If those people are provided the right knowledge and skills they could turn their visions into actions. It would give a boost to global efforts for establishing a culture of peace while making possible that voices of different people were heard.

Why entrepreneurship?
For many decades, economics has been at the focus of the world’s smallest and biggest countries. However, traditional economics cannot be at the focus of a planet with limited resources. Firstly, this model will cause irreversible environmental damage and secondly, inevitable conflicts over natural resources.
Hence, the economic model must switch its goal from the tale-make-waste to model to a circular economy. Education and training on sustainable entrepreneurship allow every single person to learn why it is important to switch to a circular economy and how to do it in innovative ways. Innovation at this point does not stand for big tech or new inventions. It’s about practical and smart solutions that can improve people’s lives and help save the planet at the same time.

Furthermore, access to entrepreneurial knowledge contributes to the purpose of the 2030 Agenda to ‘leave no one behind’. People all over the world contribute to the achievement of the 17 Sustainable Goals in different ways. Social entrepreneurship is one of them as it can help to achieve each of the SDGs.
Today, September 21 is the International Day of Peace. The 2020 theme for this important day is: Shaping peace together. Celebrate the day by spreading compassion, kindness, and hope in the face of a health crisis that highlighted the importance of global cooperation.

If you like the idea of building a culture of peace through entrepreneurship, you can take the online training offered by the Entrepreneurship Campus or submit an innovative idea or project that champions one or two SDGs to the Citizen Entrepreneurship Competition. The deadline for submitting new entries is on September 30th.

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172 Comments

  1. Thanks to the Entrepreneurship Campus organizers, today’s blog is awesome. The natural effect of commerce is to bring peace.

  2. In various studies, experts have shed light on the importance of empowering entrepreneurs and creating employment in the conflict zones —even while conflicts are still ongoing— to improve the level of security in post-conflict countries.

  3. +150 startups were created in Syria last year—from BitCode, a platform to teach youth how to code in Arabic, to Clerk, an AI system for improving the recruitment process.
    The conflict in Syria has affected the population in many ways, but it has not stopped entrepreneurs from solving the problems they encounter in their daily lives every day.

  4. Startups like the ones mentioned above have the potential to create much-needed jobs in regions where few jobs exist.
    They can further help as mechanisms for finding innovative solutions for critical problems in the region.

  5. Startups like the ones mentioned above have the potential to create much-needed jobs in regions where few jobs exist. They can further help as mechanisms for finding innovative solutions for critical problems in the region.

  6. Entrepreneurship, if efficiently deployed, can be a dynamic for growth and long-term renovation.
    It has the potential to boost economic recovery while improving access to essential services.
    It can spark unprecedented competition, triggering a wave of innovation, tech-based jobs, and eco-friendly trends. I’m encouraging us all to take the advantage of the Online training offered by the Entrepreneurship Campus.

  7. “Social entrepreneurship is a practical way to build peace in local communities and in the world. One of its main advantages is the inclusion of young people in creating a safer, securer, and healthier world. At the same time, it provides an opportunity for every person, no matter what their age is, to get their voices heard”

    This is quite true, many competitions, I have seen does not believe in this, for me campus competition is the best as it is all encompassing from age to other aspects of life.
    Thank you campus admin for sharing this article

  8. It’s awesome you know, to see how this great initiative is empowering us to not only succeed in our own Ideas / ventures, but to return home and demonstrate to others how to build inclusive business models for the digital era.
    Thanks to the YOUTH CITIZEN ENTREPRENEURSHIP CAMPUS Organizers! Well done.

  9. Entrepreneurship for Sustaining Peace

    Introduction

    The sustaining peace narrative posits the existence of an ecosystem that can simultaneously prevent the outbreak of violent conflict and proactively foster peaceful societies.2Economic opportunities are an important component of this ecosystem; the inequitable distribution of resources, economic deprivation, exclusion, and joblessness have all been well-documented as root causes of conflict both nationally and globally.3Although the relationship between economic development and peace is complex and is neither direct nor immediately apparent, the availability of equal economic opportunities can contribute to preventing conflict and sustaining peace.4 The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by the UN General Assembly in September 2015, serves as “a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity.”5It offers an effective blueprint for inclusive national development policies that are universally applicable, that “leave no one behind,” and that contribute to sustaining peace. Entrepreneurship, as referenced in the 2030Agenda, is not only critical to achieving Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 8 on decent work and economic growth,6but can also catalyze progress toward the twin goals of prosperity and peace.7A growing number of scholars and practitioners have come to study entrepreneurship as both a job creator and a peace incubator, particularly in post-conflict settings.8 Definitions of “entrepreneurship” abound.9Practically speaking, an
    entrepreneur may be defined as “a person with the vision to see a new product or process and the ability to make it happen.”10This paper makes a clear distinction between “necessity entrepreneurs,” for whom—in the absence of formal economic opportunities—self-employment is one of few options to earn.
    Conversations on Prevention for Sustaining Peace
    We are beginning to understand what peace is—the structures,attitudes, and institutions that underpin it, and the motives that drive people to work for it. Still,peace remains largely an elusive goal, often negatively portrayed as the absence of violence.It has been assumed that if we can understand the complexity of war and violence, we will be able to foster and sustain peace. We do not study peace, and therefore we tend to focus on the problems of conflict and aggression rather than the solutions associated with peace.1With this approach, prevention is viewed as a crisis management tool to address the destructive dynamics of conflict after they have occurred,typically through short-term and externally driven responses.To address this peace deficit, IPI is seeking to reframe prevention for the purpose of sustaining peace rather than averting conflict through a series of conversations from October 2016 to June 2017. The overarching aim will be to build a shared understanding of what sustaining peace and prevention look like in practice at the national and international levels.This issue brief was drafted by Youssef Mahmoud, Anupah Makoond, and Ameya Naik. The views expressed in this publication represent those of the authors and not necessarily those of the International Peace Institute. IPI welcomes consideration of a wide range of perspectives in the pursuit of a well-informed debate on critical policies and issues in international affairs.

  10. This is so motivating! here at youth entrepreneurship campus organization even the smallest incentive have a big effect!in exchange for reaching our common goals from a common ground of sustainable development,we have been given free online trainings and courses on why be a sustainable entrepreneur and how to be established in a sustainable model! You are welcomed to support sustainable initiative in hospitality sector,by voting and commenting

    @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/18538
    Regards,
    Boniface.

  11. Entrepreneurship campus , the article above is very important . Those who have gone through hard times in their lives because of conflict due to war have reasons how a clear vision of a peaceful world should be.

  12. At the same time, they have the desire to live in a conflict – free world.

  13. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    Social entrepreneurship is an approach by individuals, groups, start-up companies or entrepreneurs, in which they develop, fund and implement solutions to social, cultural, or environmental issues. This concept may be applied to a wide range of organizations, which vary in size, aims, and beliefs.
    Social entrepreneurship is, at its most basic level, doing business for a social cause. It might also be referred to as altruistic entrepreneurship. … They don’t measure their success in terms of profit alone – success to social entrepreneurs means that they have improved the world, however they define that.
    Is social entrepreneurship good business?
    Social entrepreneurs aren’t only concerned with profits. Success is also defined by how their business improves the world. Unlike nonprofits, social entrepreneurship still earns a profit, but the focus is placed on the social or environmental change made while earning that profit
    Do social entrepreneurs make money?
    The short answer is that it depends. In many cases, social entrepreneurs do make money. They’re living proof that you can be successful as a business owner and do good at the same time. However, in some cases, the entrepreneurs elect not to take a profit for themselves.

  14. All the 13 comments by my co campus members are really indicators for peace

  15. Education and Training are keys towards peaceful journey

  16. The 2020 international day of peace headline, Shaping the World through peace that using Compassion, Kindness and Love as our empowering tools inspired me a lot

  17. I want to ask, what of trust as our shaping peace together tool?

    • social entrepreneur being a person who pursues novel applications that have the potential to solve community based problems,we are individuals who are willing to take on the risk and effort to create positive changes in our societies through our initiatives,since providing youth with civic or peace education alone cannot be effective in addressing social inequality ,we as youth need social entrepreneur practices in building peaceful communities! Thanks to youth entrepreneurship campus online courses and trainings which is modeling us to be sustainable social entrepreneur.
      With regards,
      @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/18538

  18. What of empathy?

  19. What about synergy?

  20. What of Collaboration and Partnership?

  21. What of Sharing?

  22. If yes, l ask much questions than seeking answers.

    Have you engage in sharing?

    Have you motivate any entry in this platform so far?

    If NO, what are you waiting for?

  23. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    Social entrepreneurship is an approach by individuals, groups, start-up companies or entrepreneurs, in which they develop, fund and implement solutions to social, cultural, or environmental issues. This concept may be applied to a wide range of organizations, which vary in size, aims, and beliefs.For-profit entrepreneurs typically measure performance using business metrics like profit, revenues and increases in stock prices. Social entrepreneurs, however, are either non-profits, or they blend for-profit goals with generating a positive “return to society”. Therefore, they use different metrics. Social entrepreneurship typically attempts to further broad social, cultural, and environmental goals often associated with the voluntary sector in areas such as poverty alleviation, health care and community development.

  24. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    At times, profit-making social enterprises may be established to support the social or cultural goals of the organization but not as an end in themselves. For example, an organization that aims to provide housing and employment to the homeless may operate a restaurant, both to raise money and to provide employment for the homeless.

  25. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    In the 2010s social entrepreneurship was facilitated by the use of the Internet, particularly social networking and social media websites. These websites enable social entrepreneurs to reach numerous people who are not geographically close yet who share the same goals and encourage them to collaborate online, learn about the issues, disseminate information about the group’s events and activities, and raise funds through crowdfunding.[citation needed]

  26. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    In recent years, researchers are calling for a better understanding of the ecosystem in which social entrepreneurship exists, and social ventures operate. This will help them formulate better strategy and help achieve their double bottom line objective.

  27. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    The concept of Social Entrepreneurship emerged in the 1980s and since then has only been gaining more momentum. Despite this fact, after decades of efforts to find a common ground to define the concept, no consensus has been reached.

  28. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    The dynamicity of the object and the multiplicity of the conceptual lens used by researchers has made it impossible to capture it, in such a way that scholars have compared it with a mythological beast.

  29. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    Scholars have different backgrounds, generating a great disparity of conceptualizations. These should be arranged in 5 clusters of meaning, according to the focus given and the conceptual framework assumed by the researcher. The first group of authors focuses on the person of the entrepreneur, being the mainstream definition. J. G. Dees argues that Social Entrepreneurship is the result and the creation of an especially creative and innovator leader

  30. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    Social entrepreneurs can include a range of career types and professional backgrounds, ranging from social work and community development to entrepreneurship and environmental science. For this reason, it is difficult to determine who is a social entrepreneur. David Bornstein has even used the term “social innovator” interchangeably with social entrepreneur, due to the creative, non-traditional strategies that many social entrepreneurs use.[10] For a clearer definition of what social entrepreneurship entails, it is necessary to set the function of social entrepreneurship apart from other voluntary sector and charity-oriented activities and identify the boundaries within which social entrepreneurs operate.[11] Some scholars have advocated restricting the term to founders of organizations that primarily rely on earned income (meaning income earned directly from paying consumers), rather than income from donations or grants. Others have extended this to include contracted work for public authorities, while still others include grants and donations.

  31. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    Social entrepreneurship in modern society offers an altruistic form of entrepreneurship that focuses on the benefits that society may reap.

  32. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    Simply put, entrepreneurship becomes a social endeavor when it transforms social capital in a way that affects society positively.[13] It is viewed as advantageous because the success of social entrepreneurship depends on many factors related to social impact that traditional corporate businesses do not prioritize. Social entrepreneurs recognize immediate social problems, but also seek to understand the broader context of an issue that crosses disciplines, fields, and theories.

  33. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    Gaining a larger understanding of how an issue relates to society allows social entrepreneurs to develop innovative solutions and mobilize available resources to affect the greater global society. Unlike traditional corporate businesses, social entrepreneurship ventures focus on maximizing gains in social satisfaction, rather than maximizing profit gains.[14] Both private and public agencies worldwide have had billion-dollar initiatives to empower deprived communities and individuals.[13] Such support from organizations in society, such as government-aid agencies or private firms, may catalyze innovative ideas to reach a larger audience.

  34. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    Prominent individuals associated with social entrepreneurship include Pakistani Akhter Hameed Khan and Bangladeshi Muhammad Yunus, a leader of social entrepreneurship in South Asia. Yunus was the founder of Grameen Bank, which pioneered the concept of microcredit for supporting innovators in multiple developing countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.[15] He received a Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts. Others, such as former Indianapolis mayor Stephen Goldsmith addressed social efforts on a local level by using the private sector to provide city services.[16][17]

  35. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    Characteristucs of social enterprenuership.
    Bill Drayton founded Ashoka in 1980, an organization which supports local social entrepreneurs. Drayton tells his employees to look for four qualities: creativity, entrepreneurial quality, social impact of the idea, and ethical fiber.[18] Creativity has two parts: goal-setting and problem-solving. Social entrepreneurs are creative enough to have a vision of what they want to happen and how to make that vision happen.[19] In their book The Power of Unreasonable People John Elkington and Pamela Hartigan identify why social entrepreneurs are, as they put it, unreasonable. They argue that these men and women seek profit in social output where others would not expect profit. They also ignore evidence suggesting that their enterprises will fail and attempt to measure results which no one is equipped to measure.[20] About this, the Schwab Foundation says that entrepreneurs have “A zeal to measure and monitor their impact. Entrepreneurs have high standards, particularly in relation to their own organization’s efforts and in response to the communities with which they engage. Data, both quantitative and qualitative, are their key tools, guiding continuous feedback and improvement.”[21] Ashoka operates in multiple countries.

  36. In addition to juliusanayochukwu’s comment, Entrepreneurial quality builds from creativity. Not only do entrepreneurs have an idea that they must implement, they know how to implement it and are realistic in the vision of implementing it. Drayton says that, “Entrepreneurs have in their heads the vision of how society will be different when their idea is at work, and they can’t stop until that idea is not only at work in one place, but is at work across the whole society.”[22] This manifests through a clear idea of what they believe the future will look like and a drive to make this come true. Besides this, entrepreneurs are not happy with the status quo; they want healthy change.[23] This changemaking process has been described as the creation of market disequilibria through the conversion of antagonistic assets into complementarities.[24][25]

  37. Social impact measures whether the idea itself will be able to cause change after the original founder is gone. If an idea has intrinsic worth, once implemented it will cause change even without the charismatic leadership of the first entrepreneur.[26] One reason that these entrepreneurs are unreasonable is that they are unqualified for the task they take on. Most entrepreneurs have not studied the skills needed to implement their ideas. Instead, they bring a team of qualified people around themselves.[27] It is the idea that draws this team.

  38. Ethical fiber is important because leaders who are about to change the world must be trustworthy. Drayton described this to his employees by suggesting that they picture a situation that frightens them and then place the candidate in the situation with them. If they feel comfortable in this scenario, the entrepreneur has ethical fiber.[28] One distinguishing attribute of entrepreneurs is that they rarely take credit for making change. They insist that the change they have brought about is due to everyone around them. They also tend to be driven by emotion; they are not trying primarily to make a profit but to address suffering.[29] Muhammad Yunus says about this characteristic, “He (or she) competes in the marketplace with all other competitors but is inspired by a set of social objectives. This is the basic reason for being in the business.”[30]

  39. Anonymous

    22.09.2020 · Reply

    Challenges in Social Enterprenuership.
    Because the world of social entrepreneurship is relatively new, there are many challenges facing those who delve into the field. First, social entrepreneurs are trying to predict, address, and creatively respond to future problems.[31] Unlike most business entrepreneurs, who address current market deficiencies, social entrepreneurs tackle hypothetical, unseen or often less-researched issues, such as overpopulation, unsustainable energy sources, food shortages.[32] Founding successful social businesses on merely potential solutions can be nearly impossible as investors are much less willing to support risky ventures.

    The lack of eager investors leads to the second problem in social entrepreneurship: the pay gap. Elkington and Hartigan note that “the salary gap between commercial and social enterprises… remains the elephant in the room, curtailing the capacity of [social enterprises] to achieve long-term success and viability.”[33] Social entrepreneurs and their employees are often given diminutive or non-existent salaries, especially at the onset of their ventures. Thus, their enterprises struggle to maintain qualified, committed employees. Though social entrepreneurs are tackling the world’s most pressing issues, they must also confront skepticism and stinginess from the very society they seek to serve.[33]

    Another reason social entrepreneurs are often unsuccessful is because they typically offer help to those least able to pay for it. Capitalism is founded upon the exchange of capital (most obviously, money) for goods and services. However, social entrepreneurs must find new business models that do not rely on standard exchange of capital in order to make their organizations sustainable.[34] This self-sustainability is what distinguishes social businesses from charities, who rely almost entirely on donations and outside funding.[35]

  40. “Those who have gone through difficult phases in their lives because of conflict due to wars or even climate-related reasons have a clear vision of how a peaceful world should be. At the same time, they have the desire to live in a conflict-free world. If those people are provided the right knowledge and skills they could turn their visions into actions. It would give a boost to global efforts for establishing a culture of peace while making possible that voices of different people were heard”.

    In the scenerio above, only social entreprises can help achieve such peace.

  41. I am convinced that the World future belongs to the entrepreneurs, those tireless dreamers for whom every problem is an opportunity.
    I have no doubt that all these young amazing people I meet here in the YCEC 2020 will be the future heroes of the continent.
    I wanna appreciate the organizers of the YCEC for giving us this awesome opportunity to bring us together.
    It’s an awesome experience on this campus. I’m currently learning and making new friends.
    It is such a beautiful journey that I will always be cherishing through out my life. Right from the time I got accepted in the second round I felt that I could do something more.Then, I got more encouraged and I
    shared my ideas.
    It is not just a platform to share our ideas and bring about a change but there are also other things that I’m currently learning like the online trainings, interact with international friends and be a member of it., honesty speaking i’m proud to be an alumni of this great Institution.
    I really wanna thanks to the organizers for providing us such a great platform to Putford our ideas, set our vision to do something for the society!, Thank you so much for everything.

  42. How to Build Peace through Entrepreneurship.

    Campus members do you know that?

    The sure thing is that the vision of peace shared by heads of states, politicians, diplomats, scholars, and common people who have always been living in the absence of war and conflict differs from the vision of those living under the stress of war and all its outcomes.

  43. September 21 is the International Day of Peace. The 2020 theme for this important day is: Shaping peace together. Celebrate the day by spreading compassion, kindness, and hope in the face of a health crisis that highlighted the importance of global cooperation.

  44. I have never really thought about the future until Until two months ago an announcement was made at our school about one girl. She was seriously ill. She had cancer. A very aggressive form of it. The doctors in our country did everything they could for her. Still she was dying. Her only hope was the treatment that she could get in Germany. She needed minimum of 50 thousand Euros to be able to go and soon. The price of the human life. It’s a lot of money here. So her parents started raising funds wherever they could and eventually came to our school. Nowadays we have almost got used to such stories because after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station accident the rate of cancer among children in Belarus has increased 13 times. This power station is situated almost at the boarder of our Republic and right after the accident the wind was blowing north and carrying radioactive clouds in our direction So there are articles in newspapers, announcements on TV, Internet about kids dying of cancer who need urgent help.

  45. But this girl was special. I understood it when I saw her picture. She was bald after chemotherapy, very pale, hollow-eyed and SMILING. She had such a radiant smile! This impressed me greatly. And not only me. I saw that most of my classmates brought money for her the next day. How courageous must she be to be able to smile in that situation! Then for a moment I tried to imagine myself in her place. How scary must it be to know that your life might end in a day, a week, a month But she seemed not to be afraid. Then suddenly I got an insight – I will also die, all people die. The only difference was that she knew it could happen soon. Death became real to her but for me it used to be unreal, like a phantom. I became aware of part of my future, the part that is common for all of us

  46. That day when I was doing my Math homework I imagined that our lives on the Earth aren’t half-lines, they are intercepts, as they have the beginning and the end. Some of us have longer intercepts, others shorter. Anyway time is too limited to spend it on trifles, to waste it. When surfing the Net I came across a book “Death: The Final Stage of Growth” by Doctor Elisabeth Kubler-Ross. It gives a lot of examples of what changes people undergo when they learn that they will die soon. They experience a great leap in their spiritual development and find themselves much happier than they used to be before when they were enjoying the boons of life thinking that they would live forever. I believe it is true for me as well. Not because I am going to die soon, on the contrary I hope to live long. But that girl and her attitude made me appreciate and treasure what I have. Now to have simply a long life is not enough for me, I wish to have “the fullness of days” as it is called in the Bible. Now I try to manage my days putting important things first – developing good relations with people around me, spending time with them, showing care, listening to them. It is SO hard. Nevertheless I believe that if I manage to build my days around these priorities, I won’t consider my life wasted when the predictable future (death) comes.

  47. What a paradox – I decided to improve my life when I started thinking about death! How wise the Romans were when they said: “Memento more”. This expression shows that we shouldn’t take our life as a rough book thinking that one day in far away future we’ll be able to rewrite it. No, we only have a fair copy. What is done is done. And what is not done might never be done. The chance to behave correctly we have today, not in the future. Death is a great motivator of life. Not the fear of death that terrorists try to impose on people and this way make them do what they want. No, I mean the recognition of it that motivates us to be good now and here, thus leading us to better future.

  48. Predictable Future

    My above sustainable articles and comments that build and shape peace together through sustainability and peaceful mother earth is likened to the above Predictable future about the dying girl

  49. My articles for educating others contestants in this platform form today is a sort of Mother Teresa

    Make some to smile it is very imperative, not just chasing the People Choice’s Prize Winner

  50. Before you log out from this interactive section in disgust, take time to read my comments above

    Auf Wiedersehen
    Tschuss

  51. I think categorically, Ephraim’s comment above is not just rescuing and saving a young dying girl from death, but death in unavoidable

    We must embrace all the above comments

  52. Ephraims comments strike a cord on how we can collectively create lasting peace with our ideas and projects

  53. EVERY CHILD’S RIGHT TO BE HEARD

    why Listening to Children is important
    “If you had a problem in the Black community, and you brought in a group of White people to discuss how to solve it, almost nobody would take that panel seriously. In fact, there’d probably be a public outcry. It would be the same for women’s issues or gay issues. But every day, in local arenas all the way to the White House, adults sit around and decide what problems youth have and what youth need, without ever consulting us.”Jason, 17, Youth Force Member, Bronx, NY. There are widely held views that children lack capacity to make informed contributions to decision-making, that doing so may place them at risk and that their participation will have adverse effects on family and school life. However, the experience of child participation around the world provides a growing body of evidence, not only that these concerns are unfounded, but that participation has a widespread positive impact. If adults are to fulfill their obligations to promote the best interests of children, they need to listen to children themselves. The Committee on the Rights of the Child considers that recognizing the right of the child to express views and to participate in various activities, according to her or his evolving capacities, is beneficial for the child, the family, the community, the school, the state and democracy. participation contributes to personal development The realization of the right to be heard and to have views given due weight promotes the capacities of children. There is a growing body of evidence that routinely taking children’s views and experiences into account – within the family, at school and in other settings – helps develop children’s self-esteem, cognitive abilities, social skills and respect for others.5 Through participation, children acquire skills, build competence, extend aspirations and gain confidence. A virtuous circle is created. The more children participate, the more effective their contributions and the greater the impact on their development. Children acquire competence in direct relation to the scope available to them to exercise agency over their own lives. The most effective preparation for building self-confidence is to achieve a goal for oneself and not merely to observe someone else achieving that goal. Children who are highly marginalized find it very hard to achieve this on their own and need support through organized participation if they are to realize their potential.participation leads to better decision-making and outcomes Adults do not always have sufficient insight into children’s lives to be able to make informed and effective decisions on the legislation, policies and programmes designed for children. Children have a unique body of knowledge about their lives, needs and concerns, together with ideas and views which derive from their direct experience. This knowledge and experience relates to both matters affecting them as individuals and matters of wider concern to children as a group. It needs to inform all decision-making processes affecting children’s lives. Decisions that are fully informed by children’s own perspectives will be more relevant, more effective and more sustainable.

  54. ADDRESSING THE ARGUMENTS AGAINST CHILDREN’S PARTICIPATION
    Despite recognition in international law through the UNCRC that child participation is a fundamental human right, and despite the powerful arguments as to the benefit it brings, there is still considerable resistance to its realization. The arguments include:
    Children lack the competence or experience to participate.
    But children have different levels of competence in respect of different aspects of their lives. Even very small children can tell you what they like or dislike about school and why, can produce ideas for making a lesson more interesting, can offer help to other children. Provided they are given appropriate support and adequate information and are allowed to express themselves in ways that are meaningful to them – pictures, poems, drama, photographs, as well as more conventional discussions, interviews and group work – all children can participate in issues that are important to them. Indeed, babies and toddlers can be seen as participating in varying degrees depending upon the willingness of adults to listen to what they are saying. For example, a study of Japanese nursery school children found that most disputes were resolved by the children themselves, with skillful use of compromise and bargaining, often involving moral justifications.18 Such evidence demonstrates the capacities of young children to engage effectively in taking responsibility, and negotiating solutions. The creation of settings that maximize their opportunities to explore and initiate activities themselves is a means of fulfilling the spirit of the UNCRC. Indeed, there are many areas where young children can demonstrate equal or superior competence; for example, in their capacity to acquire IT skills, remember where things are, use their imaginations, express creativity, love and compassion, mediate between arguing parents, show willingness to forgive, learn new languages. In order to respect this competence in various areas, adults must learn to hear and see what children are saying and doing without rejecting it simply because they are young.
    Children must learn to take responsibility before they can be granted rights. But newborn babies have rights and they cannot be expected to carry responsibilities. And one of the more effective ways of encouraging children to accept responsibility is to first respect their rights. If children are given the chance to share their ideas in a group and to have them taken seriously, then they will learn that others, too, have a right to be heard which must also be respected.

  55. Anonymous

    23.09.2020 · Reply

    What is political voice, why does it matter, and how can it bring about change?
    What political voice is and why and how it matters – and for whom – has emerged as a central area of interest and engagement in both domestic processes of change and international efforts to support them. An informed and aware population who can participate in political processes, hold the state to account, and exercise rights and responsibilities effectively is widely considered today as indispensable for strengthening the quality of (democratic) governance and the nature of state-society relations. Political voice has both intrinsic and instrumental value, as was prominently highlighted in the report of the High Level Panel on the post-2015 development agenda (2013). In principle, political voice enables people to pursue the goals and aspirations that they value, and to seek redress when an injustice is perceived. As Amartya Sen has argued, the importance of participation in one’s development through open and non-discriminatory processes, to have a say without fear, and to speak up against perceived injustices and wrongs are fundamental freedoms that are integral to one’s well being and quality of life.
    In addition, it is often argued that voice has a critical role to play in improving the quality of governance. In particular, people’s capacity to express and exercise their views has the potential to influence governance processes, making them more participatory and representative – especially of those who have been previously excluded or marginalized on the basis of gender, ethnicity, geography, or other identities. By increasing demands for accountability and transparency, voice can also influence government priorities, provide an important corrective to public policy, and encourage consensus building on key issues of national concern.In order to better understand the different ways in which people express their political voice(s), and explore whether, how and why voice can become a catalyst for improvements in other areas of well-being, the Development Progress project at ODI has invited a number of leading thinkers to explore these issues in a series of activities, including events and opinion pieces. The analysis below offers a synthesis of some of the key insights and lessons that have emerged, while the individual contributions can be found on pages 29 to 73. All blogs are also available on the Development Progress website, development progress.org.

    Political voice is important in and of itself, and as a catalyst for other improvements in well-being.

  56. Anonymous

    23.09.2020 · Reply

    Social entrepreneurship is distinct from the concept of entrepreneurship, yet still shares several similarities with its business cousin. [Jean-Baptiste Say] (1767–1832), a French economist, defined an entrepreneur as a person who “undertakes” an idea and shifts perspectives in a way that it alters the effect that an idea has on society.[15] An entrepreneur is further defined by Say as someone who “shifts economic resources out of an area of lower and into an area of higher productivity and greater yield.”[36] The difference between “entrepreneurship” and “social entrepreneurship”, however, stems from the purpose of a creation. Social entrepreneurs seek to transform societies at large, rather than transforming their profit margin, as classic entrepreneurs typically seek to do. Social entrepreneurs use a variety of resources to bring societies into a better state of well-being

  57. Anonymous

    23.09.2020 · Reply

    The concept of “social entrepreneurship” is not a novel idea, but in the 2000s, it has become more popular among society and academic research, notably after the publication of “The Rise of the Social Entrepreneur” by Charles Leadbeater. Many activities related to community development and higher social purpose fall within the modern definition of social entrepreneurship.

  58. Anonymous

    23.09.2020 · Reply

    Despite the established definition nowadays, social entrepreneurship remains a difficult concept to define, since it may be manifested in multiple forms. A broad definition of the concept allows interdisciplinary research efforts to understand and challenge the notions behind social entrepreneurship. No matter in which sector of society certain organizations are (i.e. corporations or unincorporated associations, societies, associations or cooperatives), social entrepreneurship focuses on the social impact that an endeavor aims at. Whether social entrepreneurship is altruistic or not is less important than the effect it has on society.

  59. Anonymous

    23.09.2020 · Reply

    The terms social entrepreneur and social entrepreneurship were used first in the literature in 1953 by H. Bowen in his book Social Responsibilities of the Businessman.

  60. Anonymous

    23.09.2020 · Reply

    The terms came into widespread use in the 1980s and 1990s, promoted by Bill Drayton,[39] Charles Leadbeater, and others.[40] From the 1950s to the 1990s, the politician Michael Young was a leading promoter of social entrepreneurship and in the 1980s, he was described by Professor Daniel Bell at Harvard University as the “world’s most successful entrepreneur of social enterprises”.

  61. Anonymous

    23.09.2020 · Reply

    Young created more than sixty new organizations worldwide, including the School for Social Entrepreneurs (SSE) which exists in the UK, Australia, and Canada and which supports individuals to realize their potential and to establish, scale, and sustain, social enterprises and social businesses. Another notable British social entrepreneur is Andrew Mawson OBE, who was given a peerage in 2007 because of his urban regeneration work including the Bromley by Bow Centre in East London. Although the terms are relatively new, social entrepreneurs and social entrepreneurship may be found throughout history. A list of a few noteworthy people whose work exemplifies the modern definition of “social entrepreneurship” includes Florence Nightingale, founder of the first nursing school and developer of modern nursing practices; Robert Owen, founder of the cooperative movement; and Vinoba Bhave, founder of India’s Land Gift Movement. During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries some of the most successful social entrepreneurs straddled the civic, governmental and business worlds. These pioneers promoted new ideas that were taken up by mainstream public services in welfare, schools and health care.

  62. Anonymous

    23.09.2020 · Reply

    The ecosystem framework can be very useful for social entrepreneurs in formulating their strategy. The need for understanding the ecosystem of social enterprises has been increasingly felt as researchers emphasize on the importance of contextual factors supporting and constraining social ventures[4]. Researcher note that there is a need to understand the ecosystems of social enterprises, as they often operate in a context which is highly localized, interacting with small, local actors, but may also be intimately connected to other systems operating at a broader (regional, country level or even global) level which influence their immediate environment[41].

  63. Anonymous

    23.09.2020 · Reply

    Many researchers such as P. N. Bloom and J. G. Dees attempted to develop an ecosystem model for social entrepreneurs. The ecosystem model proposed by them comprises of all the actors operating in the ecosystem, as well as the larger environment the laws, policies, social norms, demographic trends, and cultural institutions within which the actors play[6]. Similarly, Dees et al. (2008) developed a framework to describe the key elements of the social entrepreneurship ecosystem in which they organized the elements into two broad categories – capital infrastructure and context-setting factors[42].

    More recently in 2020, Debapratim Purkayastha, T. Tripathy and B. Das extended the business ecosystem literature to the social policy and social entrepreneurship arena. They developed a comprehensive ecosystem model in the context of the Indian microfinance sector that can be also used by other social enterprises as a framework to understand their own ecosystem and formulate their strategy. The researchers define the ecosystem as consisting of “the complex and evolving network of the focal organization (social enterprise) and all other individuals and organizations that the focal organization interact with including competitors, suppliers, complementors, customers, beneficiaries, regulators, resource providers, etc. that directly or indirectly influence each other; their interactions, as also the immediate and the broader environment (economic, social, political, etc.) the organization is influenced by and reside in”[5]. The model helps identify all the actors in the complex ecosystem, the capital infrastructure and the context-setting factors

  64. When I was born, my complexion was quite dark and that made my parents worried. In Bangladesh, everyone prefers girls having fair skin color. Relatives and neighbors used to tell that my father would need to pay a large dowry in my marriage. I grew up hearing such comments. I felt sad, worried, and even ashamed. From a very young age I was desperate to make up for my not-so-beautiful look through my works. I studied hard; I tried singing, dancing, painting, and what not. I tried frantically to be the best, so that no one can look down on me because I lack beaut

  65. Eventually, all those hard works started to pay off. Successes rushed in my life, one after another. When I was 18, I got admitted into the most prestigious business school in my country, which made me even more desperate for achievements. However, things started to change gradually. Earlier my world was very small; school, home, family and a few friends. In university, I met hundreds of people, who were hankering after achievements, jobs, money and social status. I talked with many of my school alumni whose lives were full of pride, status and prestige. I observed their so-called “successful” lives. Surprisingly, successes could not make them happy. Deep inside, they were depressed. They cursed their bosses, felt dissatisfied with work and could not spend quality time with their families.

  66. I was confused. What do we really expect from life? What should we do today to build our future tomorrow? I observed carefully and sensed a lack of positivity in the air. Dissatisfaction, intolerance, and cynicism were whimsically growing everywhere. I felt something was wrong. Statistics says our country is progressing, but what is about our people? Are we happier than before? Or, are we happy at all?

  67. I talked with more people and tried to discover the exceptional things, events and people around me who are different from the crowd. I looked forpeople who were living happily, working hard to fulfill their dreams, helping others and contributing to the society. Gradually I realized what kind of future I want.

  68. Nowadays, we are driven by material pleasure in life. Money, property, salary, luxury -these things matter most to us. We often forget the value of little things; small gifts that have made our lives truly blessed. Things like health, relationships and family, that we consider as given and never consciously think about, are the most important things in our life. We need to think beyond numbers and objects, care about numerous intangible gifts that are surrounding us. Our values, thoughts, dreams and beloved ones are taking our lives forward, not the food we eat or the money we spend

  69. I was a typical business student, waiting to work in giant multinational corporations, earn a fat paycheck at the end of month and live a luxurious life. But when I realized what really matter in life, I choose not to follow the crowd and design my own destiny. I decided to be a social entrepreneur and established a startup that provides rural poor with safe sanitation.

  70. When I learned to acknowledge the small blessings in life, I understood that to achieve true success, we should cooperate, not compete. So I started motivating my classmates and juniors. I shared my thoughts with my teachers. At first everyone considered my wish to work for the poor a short term fantasy. They advised, forbade and even ridiculed me. But I followed my heart. As I set my priorities right and gave importance to the small things that matter, nothing could discourage me. The idea of following one’s heart is not new, but I have learnt through my experience why so many people fail to do that. We often forget to acknowledge value of the most precious things and crave for the not-so-valued ones. Small things matter, but we often ignore those.

  71. Now I am 21 years old. My heart is full of passion, my eyes sparkle with confidence. No more confusion, no more inferiority complexes, no worries for not being a beauty queen. I am ready to do something for my country and the world through what I love-social business. Every social business aligns people, planet and profit simultaneously. I love to work in my social business, but I love even more to helpother entrepreneurs to establish their own ones! That’s how happiness is created in a community and spreads itself. I inspire young girls to come out
    8of their cocoons and see the world, as I am doing now. I am a free bird and now I am encouraging other birds to break their cages!

  72. Future is nowhere, but in our own hands. Enough running after petty material things; let’s start counting the uncountable

  73. Anjali Sarka story above is what I want all contestants and campus members 2020 to read, refine and examine and implement their ideas and projects

    Auf wiedersehen
    Tschuss

  74. I strongly agree with Ephraim story about our young female Bangladesh today

    She is our role model

    Let all young female entrepreneurs in this platform of CEC join her to foster a sustainable peace on earth

  75. Anjali she is a model like Mother Teresa

  76. Development economics

    Development economics is a branch of economics which deals with economic aspects of the development process in low income countries. Its focus is not only on methods of promoting economic development, economic growth and structural change but also on improving the potential for the mass of the population, for example, through health, education and workplace conditions, whether through public or private channels.

    Development economics involves the creation of theories and methods that aid in the determination of policies and practices and can be implemented at either the domestic or international level. This may involve restructuring market incentives or using mathematical methods such as intertemporal optimization for project analysis, or it may involve a mixture of quantitative and qualitative methods.

    Unlike in many other fields of economics, approaches in development economics may incorporate social and political factors to devise particular plans. Also unlike many other fields of economics, there is no consensus on what students should know. Different approaches may consider the factors that contribute to economic convergence or non-convergence across households, regions, and countries.

  77. Anonymous

    24.09.2020 · Reply

    Achieving Sustainable Development and Promoting Development Cooperation

    Overcoming Global Obstacles to Achieve Development Goals

    We are at a critical juncture in our implementation of the UN development agenda. Despite demonstrable progress, we confront delays in reaching the goals, coupled with new challenges, many of which require our urgent attention and collective action. Today is an occasion to focus on four of the most pressing challenges we face. First, the fragile state of the major developed market economies, persistent global imbalances and soaring oil and non-oil commodity prices are slowing growth of the global economy. The financial turmoil of the past year is not incidental, but a reflection of systemic weaknesses in global financial markets. These conditions threaten to undermine efforts towards the development goals. Second, rising food and energy prices are hitting hard on the livelihoods of poor and vulnerable people. Progress so far towards our developmental goals could easily be reversed if we do not find workable solutions to the twin crises in the food and energy markets. Third, we are facing the profound threat of climate change and the deterioration of our natural environment. I believe that, if not addressed timely and adequately, this threat can bring all our development efforts to naught. It will bear down on the lives of our children and grandchildren. The pernicious impacts will be deep and pervasive. Finally, scepticism about globalization continues. There has been concern for some time that globalization is leaving behind the vulnerable and poorest communities, and the added worry now is that the middle classes are beginning to feel the effects of a much more insecure world. No social or economic order is secure if it fails to benefit the majority of those who live under it. From this perspective, we all should have serious concerns about a system whose wealthiest 400 citizens command, as a group, more resources than its bottom billion. Yet we also need to beware of the risks of a severe backlash against globalization, which could significantly curtail the opportunities and benefits of a more closely integrated world. At the same time, challenges also offer opportunities. Leaders, economists and bankers have come together to find short-term remedies to avert financial meltdown. They are also deliberating on long-term solutions to address the systemic inadequacies. The need to engage all key actors in this process is widely recognized. We must persist in pursuing truly concerted action to redress the woes of the global economy. Only then may we hope that a more robust global financial system will emerge from this credit crisis. I am also heartened by the collective efforts to deal with the food crisis. The Commission on Sustainable Development addressed agriculture and related issues at its annual session in May. ECOSOC itself launched a swift response by convening a special meeting to deal with the food crisis, which identified some key messages and actions that the international community needs to take. I have made efforts to mobilize the UN system and established the United Nations Task Force on the Global Food Crisis. Also, the High-level Conference on the World Food Security held earlier this month in Rome played a critical role in establishing a Comprehensive Framework for Action. The food crisis has laid bare the need for longer-term planning to improve world food security. Food production needs to rise by 50 per cent by the year 2030 to meet the rising demand. We have a historic opportunity to revitalize agriculture, especially in developing countries where productivity gains have been slow in recent decades. By using small farm holders as a key vehicle to achieve global food security, we also have an historic opportunity to make marked progress towards eliminating rural poverty. Efforts are already underway to bring together producers and consumers at the highest level to find a solution to the challenge of rising fuel prices. Yet, we also need to focus on long-term solutions, encouraging the sustainable production and use of efficient and clean sources of energy, more fuel efficient modern technologies, and changes in overall production and consumption patterns. Unprecedented awareness of the scale and scope of the challenges of climate change has put the need for urgent collective action in sharp relief. In fact, public support for the whole sustainable development agenda is greater than ever before. This session of ECOSOC should give new impetus to the realization of our long-standing goal of achieving economic growth, social development and environmental protection in an integrated and balanced manner, which is the key to the prosperity of humankind. While globalization may be an ineluctable fact of life, all governments have agreed, since the Millennium Declaration, to seek to manage globalization for the benefit of all. All countries certainly need policies and institutions that are flexible and tailored to their changing domestic and external circumstances and their individual challenges. We also need to ensure greater coherence in global policies in the areas of finance, trade, aid and investment. Fortunately, we have some critical opportunities this year to accelerate progress in strengthening the global partnership for development, including the Development Cooperation Forum, which will open its first-ever session this afternoon. The Development Cooperation Forum should become the principal venue for global dialogue and policy review on the effectiveness and coherence of international development cooperation. The inclusion of all relevant development actors in the Forum process provides a unique opportunity to garner a wide range of inputs for a deepened dialogue and understanding of the international development cooperation agenda. These issues are vital to the achievement of all the internationally agreed development goals.
    In my report on “Trends and progress in international development cooperation”, which will be introduced this afternoon, I have echoed the concern that the current aid effectiveness framework is not sufficiently responsive to development issues that cut across multiple sectors such as human rights, gender equality and environmental sustainability. The Development Cooperation Forum should give due attention to these cross-cutting imperatives. On all of these fronts, we have to act together and urgently. ECOSOC has proved that it can spearhead such a concerted effort to find pragmatic solutions to complex challenges. Last year, I witnessed the transformation of ECOSOC into an interactive forum where collective solutions to common as well as individual challenges were discussed and debated. This year, we will have even more of such dialogues and, of course, the inaugural session of the Development Cooperation Forum. I welcome the broad participation of parliamentarians, local governments and civil society. They are key partners in helping implement the development agenda and making aid effective at the country level. I congratulate all those countries that have volunteered for national presentations during the Annual Ministerial Review. The strong legislative basis, the enthusiastic involvement of the UN system and the other development actors, will enable the Council to move forward with firm commitment and strong political will to implement.

  78. Anonymous

    24.09.2020 · Reply

    Social entrepreneurship is attracting growing amounts of talent, money, and attention, but along with its increasing popularity has come less certainty about what exactly a social entrepreneur is and does.

  79. Anonymous

    24.09.2020 · Reply

    The nascent field of social entrepreneurship is growing rapidly and attracting increased attention from many sectors. The term itself shows up frequently in the media, is referenced by public officials, has become common on university campuses, and informs the strategy of several prominent social sector organizations, including Ashoka and the Schwab and Skoll Foundation foundations.

  80. Anonymous

    24.09.2020 · Reply

    The reasons behind the popularity of social entrepreneurship are many. On the most basic level, there’s something inherently interesting and appealing about entrepreneurs and the stories of why and how they do what they do. People are attracted to social entrepreneurs like last year’s Nobel Peace Prize laureate Muhammad Yunus for many of the same reasons that they find business entrepreneurs like Steve Jobs so compelling – these extraordinary people come up with brilliant ideas and against all the odds succeed at creating new products and services that dramatically improve people’s lives.

    But interest in social entrepreneurship transcends the phenomenon of popularity and fascination with people. Social entrepreneurship signals the imperative to drive social change, and it is that potential payoff, with its lasting, transformational benefit to society, that sets the field and its practitioners apart.

  81. Anonymous

    24.09.2020 · Reply

    Although the potential benefits offered by social entrepreneurship are clear to many of those promoting and funding these activities, the actual definition of what social entrepreneurs do to produce this order of magnitude return is less clear. In fact, we would argue that the definition of social entrepreneurship today is anything but clear. As a result, social entrepreneurship has become so inclusive that it now has an immense tent into which all manner of socially beneficial activities fit.

  82. Anonymous

    24.09.2020 · Reply

    In some respects this inclusiveness could be a good thing. If plenty of resources are pouring into the social sector, and if many causes that otherwise would not get sufficient funding now get support because they are regarded as social entrepreneurship, then it may be fine to have a loose definition. We are inclined to argue, however, that this is a flawed assumption and a precarious stance.

  83. Anonymous

    24.09.2020 · Reply

    Social entrepreneurship is an appealing construct precisely because it holds such high promise. If that promise is not fulfilled because too many “nonentrepreneurial” efforts are included in the definition, then social entrepreneurship will fall into disrepute, and the kernel of true social entrepreneurship will be lost. Because of this danger, we believe that we need a much sharper definition of social entrepreneurship, one that enables us to determine the extent to which an activity is and is not “in the tent.” Our goal is not to make an invidious comparison between the contributions made by traditional social service organizations and the results of social entrepreneurship, but simply to highlight what differentiates them.

  84. Anonymous

    24.09.2020 · Reply

    If we can achieve a rigorous definition, then those who support social entrepreneurship can focus their resources on building and strengthening a concrete and identifiable field. Absent that discipline, proponents of social entrepreneurship run the risk of giving the skeptics an ever-expanding target to shoot at, and the cynics even more reason to discount social innovation and those who drive it.

  85. Indeed the entrepreneurship campus is a hub for brewing the very best of 21st century entrepreneurs, our world need people that cab provide solution that are sustainable and effect my just today but also tomorrow, so we prevent the errors of yesterday and improve on our mistakes of today.

  86. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    Starting With Entrepreneurship
    Any definition of the term “social entrepreneurship” must start with the word “entrepreneurship.” The word “social” simply modifies entrepreneurship. If entrepreneurship doesn’t have a clear meaning, then modifying it with social won’t accomplish much, either.

    The word entrepreneurship is a mixed blessing. On the positive side, it connotes a special, innate ability to sense and act on opportunity, combining out-of-the-box thinking with a unique brand of determination to create or bring about something new to the world. On the negative side, entrepreneurship is an ex post term, because entrepreneurial activities require a passage of time before their true impact is evident.

  87. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    Interestingly, we don’t call someone who exhibits all of the personal characteristics of an entrepreneur – opportunity sensing, out-of-the-box thinking, and determination – yet who failed miserably in his or her venture an entrepreneur; we call him or her a business failure.
    .

  88. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    Even someone like Bob Young, of Red Hat Software fame, is called a “serial entrepreneur” only after his first success; i.e., all of his prior failures are dubbed the work of a serial entrepreneur only after the occurrence of his first success. The problem with ex post definitions is that they tend to be ill defined. It’s simply harder to get your arms around what’s unproven. An entrepreneur can certainly claim to be one, but without at least one notch on the belt, the self-proclaimed will have a tough time persuading investors to place bets. Those investors, in turn, must be willing to assume greater risk as they assess the credibility of would-be entrepreneurs and the potential impact of formative ventures

  89. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    Even with these considerations, we believe that appropriating entrepreneurship for the term social entrepreneurship requires wrestling with what we actually mean by entrepreneurship. Is it simply alertness to opportunity? Creativity? Determination? Although these and other behavioral characteristics are part of the story and certainly provide important clues for prospective investors, they are not the whole story. Such descriptors are also used to describe inventors, artists, corporate executives, and other societal actors.

  90. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    Like most students of entrepreneurship, we begin with French economist Jean-Baptiste Say, who in the early 19th century described the entrepreneur as one who “shifts economic resources out of an area of lower and into an area of higher productivity and greater yield,” thereby expanding the literal translation from the French, “one who undertakes,” to encompass the concept of value creation.1

  91. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    ESSENTIALS OF SOCIAL INNOVATION
    Social Entrepreneurship: The Case for Definition
    Social entrepreneurship is attracting growing amounts of talent, money, and attention, but along with its increasing popularity has come less certainty about what exactly a social entrepreneur is and does.

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    By Roger L. Martin & Sally Osberg Spring 2007

    (Photo by iStock/phototechno)

    Essentials of Social Innovation
    A starter kit for leaders of social change.

    • Collective Impact

    • Social Entrepreneurship: The Case for Definition

    • The Dawn of System Leadership

    • Design Thinking for Social Innovation

    • The Nonprofit Starvation Cycle

    • Ten Nonprofit Funding Models

    • The Science of What Makes People Care

    • Stop Raising Awareness Already

    • Rediscovering Social Innovation

    • Innovation Is Not the Holy Grail

    The nascent field of social entrepreneurship is growing rapidly and attracting increased attention from many sectors. The term itself shows up frequently in the media, is referenced by public officials, has become common on university campuses, and informs the strategy of several prominent social sector organizations, including Ashoka and the Schwab and Skoll Foundation foundations.

    The reasons behind the popularity of social entrepreneurship are many. On the most basic level, there’s something inherently interesting and appealing about entrepreneurs and the stories of why and how they do what they do. People are attracted to social entrepreneurs like last year’s Nobel Peace Prize laureate Muhammad Yunus for many of the same reasons that they find business entrepreneurs like Steve Jobs so compelling – these extraordinary people come up with brilliant ideas and against all the odds succeed at creating new products and services that dramatically improve people’s lives.

    But interest in social entrepreneurship transcends the phenomenon of popularity and fascination with people. Social entrepreneurship signals the imperative to drive social change, and it is that potential payoff, with its lasting, transformational benefit to society, that sets the field and its practitioners apart.

    Although the potential benefits offered by social entrepreneurship are clear to many of those promoting and funding these activities, the actual definition of what social entrepreneurs do to produce this order of magnitude return is less clear. In fact, we would argue that the definition of social entrepreneurship today is anything but clear. As a result, social entrepreneurship has become so inclusive that it now has an immense tent into which all manner of socially beneficial activities fit.

    In some respects this inclusiveness could be a good thing. If plenty of resources are pouring into the social sector, and if many causes that otherwise would not get sufficient funding now get support because they are regarded as social entrepreneurship, then it may be fine to have a loose definition. We are inclined to argue, however, that this is a flawed assumption and a precarious stance.

    Social entrepreneurship is an appealing construct precisely because it holds such high promise. If that promise is not fulfilled because too many “nonentrepreneurial” efforts are included in the definition, then social entrepreneurship will fall into disrepute, and the kernel of true social entrepreneurship will be lost. Because of this danger, we believe that we need a much sharper definition of social entrepreneurship, one that enables us to determine the extent to which an activity is and is not “in the tent.” Our goal is not to make an invidious comparison between the contributions made by traditional social service organizations and the results of social entrepreneurship, but simply to highlight what differentiates them.

    If we can achieve a rigorous definition, then those who support social entrepreneurship can focus their resources on building and strengthening a concrete and identifiable field. Absent that discipline, proponents of social entrepreneurship run the risk of giving the skeptics an ever-expanding target to shoot at, and the cynics even more reason to discount social innovation and those who drive it.

    Starting With Entrepreneurship
    Any definition of the term “social entrepreneurship” must start with the word “entrepreneurship.” The word “social” simply modifies entrepreneurship. If entrepreneurship doesn’t have a clear meaning, then modifying it with social won’t accomplish much, either.

    The word entrepreneurship is a mixed blessing. On the positive side, it connotes a special, innate ability to sense and act on opportunity, combining out-of-the-box thinking with a unique brand of determination to create or bring about something new to the world. On the negative side, entrepreneurship is an ex post term, because entrepreneurial activities require a passage of time before their true impact is evident.

    Interestingly, we don’t call someone who exhibits all of the personal characteristics of an entrepreneur – opportunity sensing, out-of-the-box thinking, and determination – yet who failed miserably in his or her venture an entrepreneur; we call him or her a business failure. Even someone like Bob Young, of Red Hat Software fame, is called a “serial entrepreneur” only after his first success; i.e., all of his prior failures are dubbed the work of a serial entrepreneur only after the occurrence of his first success. The problem with ex post definitions is that they tend to be ill defined. It’s simply harder to get your arms around what’s unproven. An entrepreneur can certainly claim to be one, but without at least one notch on the belt, the self-proclaimed will have a tough time persuading investors to place bets. Those investors, in turn, must be willing to assume greater risk as they assess the credibility of would-be entrepreneurs and the potential impact of formative ventures.

    Even with these considerations, we believe that appropriating entrepreneurship for the term social entrepreneurship requires wrestling with what we actually mean by entrepreneurship. Is it simply alertness to opportunity? Creativity? Determination? Although these and other behavioral characteristics are part of the story and certainly provide important clues for prospective investors, they are not the whole story. Such descriptors are also used to describe inventors, artists, corporate executives, and other societal actors.

    Like most students of entrepreneurship, we begin with French economist Jean-Baptiste Say, who in the early 19th century described the entrepreneur as one who “shifts economic resources out of an area of lower and into an area of higher productivity and greater yield,” thereby expanding the literal translation from the French, “one who undertakes,” to encompass the concept of value creation.1

    Writing a century later, Austrian economist Joseph Schumpeter built upon this basic concept of value creation, contributing what is arguably the most influential idea about entrepreneurship. Schumpeter identified in the entrepreneur the force required to drive economic progress, absent which economies would become static, structurally immobilized, and subject to decay. Enter the Unternehmer, Schumpeter’s entrepreneurial spirit, who identifies a commercial opportunity – whether a material, product, service, or business – and organizes a venture to implement it. Successful entrepreneurship, he argues, sets off a chain reaction, encouraging other entrepreneurs to iterate upon and ultimately propagate the innovation to the point of “creative destruction,” a state at which the new venture and all its related ventures effectively render existing products, services, and business models obsolete.2

    Despite casting the dramatis personae in heroic terms, Schumpeter’s analysis grounds entrepreneurship within a system, ascribing to the entrepreneur’s role a paradoxical impact, both disruptive and generative. Schumpeter sees the entrepreneur as an agent of change within the larger economy. Peter Drucker, on the other hand, does not see entrepreneurs as necessarily agents of change themselves, but rather as canny and committed exploiters of change. According to Drucker, “the entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity,”3 a premise picked up by Israel Kirzner, who identifies “alertness” as the entrepreneur’s most critical ability.4

    Regardless of whether they cast the entrepreneur as a breakthrough innovator or an early exploiter, theorists universally associate entrepreneurship with opportunity. Entrepreneurs are believed to have an exceptional ability to see and seize upon new opportunities, the commitment and drive required to pursue them, and an unflinching willingness to bear the inherent risks.

  92. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    Building from this theoretical base, we believe that entrepreneurship describes the combination of a context in which an opportunity is situated, a set of personal characteristics required to identify and pursue this opportunity, and the creation of a particular outcome.

    To explore and illustrate our definition of entrepreneurship, we will take a close look at a few contemporary American entrepreneurs (or pairs thereof ): Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak of Apple Computer, Pierre Omidyar and Jeff Skoll of eBay, Ann and Mike Moore of Snugli, and Fred Smith of FedEx.

  93. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    Entrepreneurial Context
    The starting point for entrepreneurship is what we call an entrepreneurial context. For Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, the entrepreneurial context was a computing system in which users were dependent on mainframe computers controlled by a central IT staff who guarded the mainframe like a shrine. Users got their computing tasks done, but only after waiting in line and using the software designed by the IT staff. If users wanted a software program to do something out of the ordinary, they were told to wait six months for the programming to be done.

  94. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    From the users’ perspective, the experience was inefficient and unsatisfactory. But since the centralized computing model was the only one available, users put up with it and built the delays and inefficiencies into their workflow, resulting in an equilibrium, albeit an unsatisfactory one.

    System dynamicists describe this kind of equilibrium as a “balanced feedback loop,” because there isn’t a strong force that has the likely effect of breaking the system out of its particular equilibrium. It is similar to a thermostat on an air conditioner: When the temperature rises, the air conditioner comes on and lowers the temperature, and the thermostat eventually turns the air conditioner off.

  95. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    The centralized computing system that users had to endure was a particular kind of equilibrium: an unsatisfactory one. It is as if the thermostat were set five degrees too low so that everyone in the room was cold. Knowing they have a stable and predictable temperature, people simply wear extra sweaters, though of course they might wish that they didn’t have to.

    Pierre Omidyar and Jeff Skoll identified an unsatisfactory equilibrium in the inability of geographically based markets to optimize the interests of both buyers and sellers. Sellers typically didn’t know who the best buyer was and buyers typically didn’t know who the best (or any) seller was. As a result, the market was not optimal for buyers or sellers. People selling used household goods, for example, held garage sales that attracted physically proximate buyers, but probably not the optimal number or types of buyers. People trying to buy obscure goods had no recourse but to search through Yellow Page directories, phoning and phoning to try to track down what they really wanted, often settling for something less than perfect. Because buyers and sellers couldn’t conceive of a better answer, the stable, yet suboptimal, equilibrium prevailed.

  96. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    Ann and Mike Moore took note of a subpar equilibrium in parents’ limited options for toting their infants. Parents wishing to keep their babies close while carrying on basic tasks had two options: They could learn to juggle offspring in one arm while managing chores with the other, or they could plop the child in a stroller, buggy, or other container and keep the child nearby. Either option was less than ideal. Everyone knows that newborns benefit from the bonding that takes place because of close physical contact with their mothers and fathers, but even the most attentive and devoted parents can’t hold their babies continuously. With no other options, parents limped along, learning to shift their child from one hip to the other and becoming adept at “one-armed paper hanging,” or attempting to get their tasks accomplished during naptime.

  97. Anonymous

    25.09.2020 · Reply

    In the case of Fred Smith, the suboptimal equilibrium he saw was the long-distance courier service. Before FedEx came along, sending a package across country was anything but simple. Local courier services picked up the package and transported it to a common carrier, who flew the package to the remote destination city, at which point it was handed over to a third party for final delivery (or perhaps back to the local courier’s operation in that city if it was a national company). This system was logistically complex, it involved a number of handoffs, and the scheduling was dictated by the needs of the common carriers. Often something would go wrong, but no one would take responsibility for solving the problem. Users learned to live with a slow, unreliable, and unsatisfactory service – an unpleasant but stable situation because no user could change it.

  98. Why Social Entrepreneurship is Vital to the SDGs: 15 Award-Winning Entrepreneurs Share their Insights

    Why Social Entrepreneurship is Vital to the SDGs: 15 Award-Winning Entrepreneurs Share their Insights

    In late 2018, new reports showed something the global development industry did not want to see: We are not on track to reach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, amidst this sobering news, the social business world has remained a bright spot. The ongoing growth of the sector is showing that, by investing in dedicated, innovative entrepreneurs, the global community can overcome this slow progress toward the SDGs and create a world with far fewer inequalities and injustices by 2030.

    I recently had the chance to connect with award-winning social entrepreneurs from around the world at the Social Capital Markets conference in San Francisco. I asked them all how entrepreneurship can help us achieve the SDGs, and their answers highlighted many of the reasons the sector is moving to the forefront of the global development agenda. I’ve compiled 15 of their responses below.

    “Social enterprises offer financially self-sustaining models for positive social change. As such, they have an important role to play in achieving the SDGs – especially considering the estimated $2.5 trillion annual deficit in funding needed to achieve them.”

    “The key word in the Sustainable Development Goals, is SUSTAINABLE. Without social enterprises, development to achieve these goals will not be sustainable.”

    “We know that some of society’s most daunting issues (including the SDGs) can no longer be addressed incrementally through well-intentioned but resource-limited NGOs and nonprofit organizations. Business affords what no other entity can: the resources to scale solutions for massive impact.”

    “The SDGs are not attainable by any one organization by design. Achieving them will require collaboration across sectors, organizations and individuals dedicated to improving the human experience for all. Social enterprise balances sustainability and impact, paving the way to realize a long-term vision with measurable short-term steps.”

    “Social enterprises are guided by a moral compass, which I strongly believe is what helps drive them towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.”

    “The SDGs aren’t achievable without wide buy-in from all, just as sustainability isn’t possible without inclusiveness. Social enterprise, because it’s engrained with sense of responsibility to community, promotes this inclusiveness.”

    “Social enterprise can move away from profit as the primary motive – embracing the power and potential for us to work in a way that puts sustainability, equity and justice at the center.”

    “Social enterprises allow society to react with smart, market-oriented solutions to global problems that can no longer be solved by governments. It brings stakeholders together to think and build return on impact in a viable way.”

    “To achieve the SDGs, we must scale up sustainable systems that can help us reach them, and then maintain them. Social enterprises are sustainable by design and focused on solving the very challenges created by old systems.”

    “The depth of the issues that the Sustainable Development Goals are seeking to achieve need the most catalytic and innovative engagements, these are represented by the determination and vision of social enterprises”.

    “The sustainable development goals are daunting, and the entire world needs to move, to meet those goals. Social enterprises will play an integral role in moving people, primarily since they are in close contact with the communities that need to move.”

    “The SDGs are critically important, and in order to achieve them we need the full force of both public and private sector working together in order to fundamentally shift systems, move resources, and create more equity.”

    “There is tremendous value created in tackling these goals, it makes sense that value can be generated – and should be invested – to help social entrepreneurs achieve them.”

    “Social enterprises are critical to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals because collectively they represent a new generation of energized leaders, focused on change at scale.”

    “Having a concrete and well-defined social impact goal rather than enterprise-based commercial intent is a strong driver to add much more value to what you try to achieve.”

    While progress towards the 17 Sustainable Development Goals is behind target, the groundswell of support coming from entrepreneurs should give us hope. These new organizations, designed with sustainability in mind, are tackling the SDGs in innovative and scalable ways — many specifically focusing on a handful of the 169 targets that demonstrate progress towards these goals. The work of these social entrepreneurs may hold the key not only to achieving the global goals, but to creating a new paradigm for development that can guide the sector toward more lasting impact.

  99. Why Social Entrepreneurship is Vital to the SDGs: 15 Award-Winning Entrepreneurs Share their Insights

    In late 2018, new reports showed something the global development industry did not want to see: We are not on track to reach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, amidst this sobering news, the social business world has remained a bright spot. The ongoing growth of the sector is showing that, by investing in dedicated, innovative entrepreneurs, the global community can overcome this slow progress toward the SDGs and create a world with far fewer inequalities and injustices by 2030.

    I recently had the chance to connect with award-winning social entrepreneurs from around the world at the Social Capital Markets conference in San Francisco. I asked them all how entrepreneurship can help us achieve the SDGs, and their answers highlighted many of the reasons the sector is moving to the forefront of the global development agenda. I’ve compiled 15 of their responses below.

    “Social enterprises offer financially self-sustaining models for positive social change. As such, they have an important role to play in achieving the SDGs – especially considering the estimated $2.5 trillion annual deficit in funding needed to achieve them.”

    Mursal Hedayat, CEO at Chatterbox

    “The key word in the Sustainable Development Goals, is SUSTAINABLE. Without social enterprises, development to achieve these goals will not be sustainable.”

    Allen Bailochan Tuladhar, CEO at Picosoft

    “We know that some of society’s most daunting issues (including the SDGs) can no longer be addressed incrementally through well-intentioned but resource-limited NGOs and nonprofit organizations. Business affords what no other entity can: the resources to scale solutions for massive impact.”

    Komal Ahmad, CEO at Copia

    “The SDGs are not attainable by any one organization by design. Achieving them will require collaboration across sectors, organizations and individuals dedicated to improving the human experience for all. Social enterprise balances sustainability and impact, paving the way to realize a long-term vision with measurable short-term steps.”

    Tori Samples, CEO at Leaf Global Fintech

    “Social enterprises are guided by a moral compass, which I strongly believe is what helps drive them towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.”

    Saieshan Govinder, CEO at EduAfrika

    “The SDGs aren’t achievable without wide buy-in from all, just as sustainability isn’t possible without inclusiveness. Social enterprise, because it’s engrained with sense of responsibility to community, promotes this inclusiveness.”

    Rebecca Novak, CEO at Code Nation

    “Social enterprise can move away from profit as the primary motive – embracing the power and potential for us to work in a way that puts sustainability, equity and justice at the center.”

    Dana Frasz, CEO at Food Shift

    “Social enterprises allow society to react with smart, market-oriented solutions to global problems that can no longer be solved by governments. It brings stakeholders together to think and build return on impact in a viable way.”

    Thami Schweichler, CEO at Makers Unite

    “To achieve the SDGs, we must scale up sustainable systems that can help us reach them, and then maintain them. Social enterprises are sustainable by design and focused on solving the very challenges created by old systems.”

    Kristin Kagetsu, CEO at Saathi Eco Innovations

    “The depth of the issues that the Sustainable Development Goals are seeking to achieve need the most catalytic and innovative engagements, these are represented by the determination and vision of social enterprises.”

    Jenna Nicholas, CEO at Impact Experience

    “The sustainable development goals are daunting, and the entire world needs to move, to meet those goals. Social enterprises will play an integral role in moving people, primarily since they are in close contact with the communities that need to move.”

    Khizr Imran Tajammul, CEO at Jaan Pak Enterprises

    “The SDGs are critically important, and in order to achieve them we need the full force of both public and private sector working together in order to fundamentally shift systems, move resources, and create more equity.”

    Ayla Schlosser, CEO at Resonate

    “There is tremendous value created in tackling these goals, it makes sense that value can be generated – and should be invested – to help social entrepreneurs achieve them.”

    Lilian Makoi, CEO at Jamii Africa

    “Social enterprises are critical to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals because collectively they represent a new generation of energized leaders, focused on change at scale.”

    Felix Brooks-church, CEO at Sanku

    “Having a concrete and well-defined social impact goal rather than enterprise-based commercial intent is a strong driver to add much more value to what you try to achieve.”

    Hasan Zafer Elcik, CEO at Otsimo

    While progress towards the 17 Sustainable Development Goals is behind target, the groundswell of support coming from entrepreneurs should give us hope. These new organizations, designed with sustainability in mind, are tackling the SDGs in innovative and scalable ways — many specifically focusing on a handful of the 169 targets that demonstrate progress towards these goals. The work of these social entrepreneurs may hold the key not only to achieving the global goals, but to creating a new paradigm for development that can guide the sector toward more lasting impact.

  100. Why Social Entrepreneurship is Vital to the SDGs: 15 Award-Winning Entrepreneurs Share their Insights

    In late 2018, new reports showed something the global development industry did not want to see: We are not on track to reach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, amidst this sobering news, the social business world has remained a bright spot. The ongoing growth of the sector is showing that, by investing in dedicated, innovative entrepreneurs, the global community can overcome this slow progress toward the SDGs and create a world with far fewer inequalities and injustices by 2030.

    I recently had the chance to connect with award-winning social entrepreneurs from around the world at the Social Capital Markets conference in San Francisco. I asked them all how entrepreneurship can help us achieve the SDGs, and their answers highlighted many of the reasons the sector is moving to the forefront of the global development agenda. I’ve compiled 15 of their responses below.

    “Social enterprises offer financially self-sustaining models for positive social change. As such, they have an important role to play in achieving the SDGs – especially considering the estimated $2.5 trillion annual deficit in funding needed to achieve them.”

    Mursal Hedayat, CEO at Chatterbox

    “The key word in the Sustainable Development Goals, is SUSTAINABLE. Without social enterprises, development to achieve these goals will not be sustainable.”

    Allen Bailochan Tuladhar, CEO at Picosoft

    “We know that some of society’s most daunting issues (including the SDGs) can no longer be addressed incrementally through well-intentioned but resource-limited NGOs and nonprofit organizations. Business affords what no other entity can: the resources to scale solutions for massive impact.”

    Komal Ahmad, CEO at Copia

    “The SDGs are not attainable by any one organization by design. Achieving them will require collaboration across sectors, organizations and individuals dedicated to improving the human experience for all. Social enterprise balances sustainability and impact, paving the way to realize a long-term vision with measurable short-term steps.”

    I agree with this comment

  101. Tori Samples, CEO at Leaf Global Fintech

    “Social enterprises are guided by a moral compass, which I strongly believe is what helps drive them towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.”

    Saieshan Govinder, CEO at EduAfrika

    “The SDGs aren’t achievable without wide buy-in from all, just as sustainability isn’t possible without inclusiveness. Social enterprise, because it’s engrained with sense of responsibility to community, promotes this inclusiveness.”

    Rebecca Novak, CEO at Code Nation

    “Social enterprise can move away from profit as the primary motive – embracing the power and potential for us to work in a way that puts sustainability, equity and justice at the center.”

    Dana Frasz, CEO at Food Shift

    “Social enterprises allow society to react with smart, market-oriented solutions to global problems that can no longer be solved by governments. It brings stakeholders together to think and build return on impact in a viable way.”

    Thami Schweichler, CEO at Makers Unite

    “To achieve the SDGs, we must scale up sustainable systems that can help us reach them, and then maintain them. Social enterprises are sustainable by design and focused on solving the very challenges created by old systems.”

    Kristin Kagetsu, CEO at Saathi Eco Innovations

    “The depth of the issues that the Sustainable Development Goals are seeking to achieve need the most catalytic and innovative engagements, these are represented by the determination and vision of social enterprises.”

    Jenna Nicholas, CEO at Impact Experience

    “The sustainable development goals are daunting, and the entire world needs to move, to meet those goals. Social enterprises will play an integral role in moving people, primarily since they are in close contact with the communities that need to move.”

    Khizr Imran Tajammul, CEO at Jaan Pak Enterprises

    “The SDGs are critically important, and in order to achieve them we need the full force of both public and private sector working together in order to fundamentally shift systems, move resources, and create more equity.”

    Ayla Schlosser, CEO at Resonate

    “There is tremendous value created in tackling these goals, it makes sense that value can be generated – and should be invested – to help social entrepreneurs achieve them.”

    Lilian Makoi, CEO at Jamii Africa

    “Social enterprises are critical to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals because collectively they represent a new generation of energized leaders, focused on change at scale.”

    Felix Brooks-church, CEO at Sanku

    “Having a concrete and well-defined social impact goal rather than enterprise-based commercial intent is a strong driver to add much more value to what you try to achieve.”

    Hasan Zafer Elcik, CEO at Otsimo

    While progress towards the 17 Sustainable Development Goals is behind target, the groundswell of support coming from entrepreneurs should give us hope. These new organizations, designed with sustainability in mind, are tackling the SDGs in innovative and scalable ways — many specifically focusing on a handful of the 169 targets that demonstrate progress towards these goals. The work of these social entrepreneurs may hold the key not only to achieving the global goals, but to creating a new paradigm for development that can guide the sector toward more lasting impact.

    I agree with this

  102. The centralized computing system that users had to endure was a particular kind of equilibrium: an unsatisfactory one. It is as if the thermostat were set five degrees too low so that everyone in the room was cold. Knowing they have a stable and predictable temperature, people simply wear extra sweaters, though of course they might wish that they didn’t have to.

    Pierre Omidyar and Jeff Skoll identified an unsatisfactory equilibrium in the inability of geographically based markets to optimize the interests of both buyers and sellers. Sellers typically didn’t know who the best buyer was and buyers typically didn’t know who the best (or any) seller was. As a result, the market was not optimal for buyers or sellers. People selling used household goods, for example, held garage sales that attracted physically proximate buyers, but probably not the optimal number or types of buyers. People trying to buy obscure goods had no recourse but to search through Yellow Page directories, phoning and phoning to try to track down what they really wanted, often settling for something less than perfect. Because buyers and sellers couldn’t conceive of a better answer, the stable, yet suboptimal, equilibrium prevailed.

    it is sustainable

  103. The nascent field of social entrepreneurship is growing rapidly and attracting increased attention from many sectors. The term itself shows up frequently in the media, is referenced by public officials, has become common on university campuses, and informs the strategy of several prominent social sector organizations, including Ashoka and the Schwab and Skoll Foundation foundations.

    I agree here with anonymous

  104. Ephraims comments are all sustainable and sustainable towards our idyllic planet.

    Keep it up Ephraim

  105. My Heritage(English translation)I am 11 years old and I am lucky.I am African. I was born in the northern part of Cote d’Ivoire in a little village with the beautiful name of Kokoton. I am a boy who is lucky, because I was adopted while I was a baby at the orphanage of Khorogo.

  106. I am lucky and I am very happy, because I have 4 parents—my birth parents, Bakary and Yéo, who gave birth to me, and my adoptive parents, whom I call my parents of love. This Dad and Mum, Serge and Annie, are raising me. I am loved, and I have also a little brother who is adopted like me, named Hamza, and a littled sister called Moie. In her Congolese language, her name means “Sun,” and her name fits her very well, because she is so pretty like the real sun.Mum has often told me my life story, that I lost my biological mother two months after I was born. She was very young, only 14 years old—almost as young as I am now. My father Bakary was 19. He was a sculptor in traditional fine art, and I am a child of love, becausemy birth parents truly were in love with each other. I was born on 19 October 2000, and I am from the Sénoufo tribe/clan, but I feel that I belong to the entire world, because in my family of love we all have different backgrounds. I am a black African, my father is a white European, my mother is black from the West Indies, my brother is métis (half white/half black) from Africa and Europe, and my little sister is caramel coloured, also from Africa

  107. I feel myself being all this at once, because at home weshare all our differences. I am from Ivory Coast when I eat some foutou made of bananas with sauce graine. When I am in Normandy with my grandparents, I feel that I am a Normand, especially when grandma is cooking some chicken with cream. And I feel that I am a citizen of Martinique when I enjoy eating some delicious fish specialities of the region and my mum sings some West Indies songs
    12for me. And I am also from the Congo, like my brother and my little sister. And I feel like a métis because to me, the world is neither white nor black, but mixed. We are all different in the world and we belong everywhere, because we can all communicate with each other across the world, especially thanks to the internet. We all meet from across the world, and we mix with each other.

  108. But what I want to convey today is that I hope that other children like me will be adopted in order to grow up in an environment of love, even if the parents are not their biological ones. Love is all that counts, and I am lucky to be loved by my parents, my grandparents, my uncles and ants, and my sister and brother.This is my family, an entire world, even though it is only a small number of individuals. We are Africans, West Indians, Europeans, and another grandfather is even from Asia. Theyall try, I know, to raise us in an atmosphere of love, while respecting our differences and who we are

  109. When I am thinking of my parents, and of my entire family—even my biological family—I sometimes have the impression that together with my brother and sister, we were the reason for bringing all these people together, and I must confess that I am very proud of this.To me, life consists of being together with everybody without the feeling of being different, and I wish that every child on the planet could feel this way, and that all those children who do not have their family anymore could be adopted by loving parents. I have never kept my story a secret from anyone, because I want to share it. My story is an asset for me and I am very proud of having many families, which all form a great big international family. This is how I want to continue growing up, and I wish the same for my brother Hamza and my little sister Moie, and for many other children in the world

  110. I have a secret to tell: being adopted is an act of love, and sometimes being abandoned is, too, because my birth father was not in a position to keep me. I could have died because he was too poor to keep me.My mother and I have a game that we play together. She tells me in my ear: “Achille, I have a secret for you.” So I come next to her and she whispers in my ear: “I love you.” It is true, my mother Annie did not carry me in her womb, but she is and will always be my mother whom I love

  111. I crave for the blog that Ephraim posted today, they are over sustainable

  112. Most imperative of it is that it is about “My Heritage” I urges all contestants, campus members to take their time and read Ephraim’s blog TODAY AND REFLECT deeply on their diverse ideas and projects to build a hundred percent peaceful world through entrepreneurship

  113. Campus members do you know that.?

    Each year the International Day of Peace is observed around the world on 21 September. The UN General Assembly has declared this as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, through observing 24 hours of non-violence and cease-fire.

  114. This year, it has been clearer than ever that we are not each other’s enemies. Rather, our common enemy is a tireless virus that threatens our health, security and very way of life. COVID-19 has thrown our world into turmoil and forcibly reminded us that what happens in one part of the planet can impact people everywhere.

  115. In March, UN Secretary-General António Guterres called on all warring parties to lay down their weapons and focus on the battle against this unprecedented global pandemic. While the message is intended for armed parties, solidarity and cooperation across borders, sectors and generations are also needed to win this new fight against the worst public health crisis of our time.

  116. As we struggle to defeat COVID-19, your voice is more important than ever. In these difficult times of physical distancing, this International Day of Peace will be dedicated to fostering dialogue and collecting ideas. The world will be invited to unite and share thoughts on how to weather this storm, heal our planet and change it for the better. Even though we may not be able to stand next to each other, we can still dream together.

  117. The 2020 theme for the International Day of Peace is “Shaping Peace Together.” Celebrate the day by spreading compassion, kindness and hope in the face of the pandemic. Stand together with the UN against attempts to use the virus to promote discrimination or hatred. Join us so that we can shape peace together.

  118. The International Day of Peace was established in 1981 by the United Nations General Assembly. Two decades later, in 2001, the General Assembly unanimously voted to designate the Day as a period of non-violence and cease-fire.

  119. The United Nations invites all nations and people to honour a cessation of hostilities during the Day, and to otherwise commemorate the Day through education and public awareness on issues related to peace.

  120. For the United Nations, 2020 was already meant to be a year of listening and learning. To mark its 75th anniversary, the UN has invited millions of people worldwide to join UN75, the largest and furthest-reaching global conversation on building the peaceful and prosperous future that we want.

  121. International days are occasions to educate the public on issues of concern, to mobilize political will and resources to address global problems, and to celebrate and reinforce achievements of humanity.

  122. I agree with the above comments, and I want you all to read them all to know the reason why.

    • Why entrepreneurship?
      Entrepreneurs are frequently thought of as national assets to be cultivated, motivated, and remunerated to the greatest possible extent. Great entrepreneurs have the ability to change the way we live and work. If successful, their innovations may improve standards of living, and in addition to creating wealth with entrepreneurial ventures, they also create jobs and contribute to a growing economy.

  123. This is a Powerful platform for young Entrepreneurs with Big Dreams.. I’m so not missing out on
    this one! Awesome is the YCEC. Through this competition, I came to know that how much people are enthusiastic around the world. I really wanna adulate everyone efforts and especially the Organizers of this great Campus who provided us a platform to share our efforts and to motivate others as well to do something nice for our society.

  124. In this fight for a sustainable future, what we need is innovation; something which is not necessarily new, but which makes us look at things from a different angle.
    I believe this is one of the major motives of this community which we are a part of. Taking one step together hand in hand towards our goal is the only way we can achieve it. So I wish each and every one of us here the very best in this endeavour of yours and hope to see you together in the new tomorrow.
    Today I wanna shear with you some tips on How To Future-Proof Your Business During A Recession.

    No business is immune to the effects of recession, but you can take this steps to protect your business.

    1/ INVEST IN TECHNOLOGY.
    While this depends on the type of the business or product/s, incorporating technology will help you streamline will help your processes and make business more easier.

    2/ CREATE A RUNNING LIST OF EXPANSION IDEAS.
    The truth is you can/t predict the future, but the more ideas you have the better. Start Now! Create an list of ways your business could adjust to the needs your customers may have during a recession.

    3/ CREATE AN ACTION PLAN.
    Don/t wait until you notice business is slowing down before you take an action.
    Create a go- to- market plan and of course, a financial plan.

    For more information please do not hesitate to contact me via my email [email protected] and follow me on Twitter @oneyoungperson / Good luck with your work and wishing you all the success on your journey. Please try to keep in touch
    Thanks!

    With kind regards,

    Umar Imam
    CEO / Co-Founder
    Afrik Designers brand

  125. 4 things you need to know about social entrepreneurship
    It’s about people
    Social entrepreneurs, beyond the glory of coming up with an amazing product and service, are highly inspired by the people they are trying to assist. Their products and cutting edge solutions are a response to problematic issues in society no matter the sector.

    It is almost like having the heart of Mother Theresa but the drive of Oprah. Outside just trying to get that paper, social entrepreneurs ensure that they meet the needs and improve communities in the same vein.

    These businesses are motivated primarily by caring about social change and reaching as many people as possible.
    It’s about innovation
    Social innovators are always looking for solutions to pressing societal issues . As a result, they have to come up with new, sustainable and inventive ways to respond to these issues. Social enterprises move past the textbook responses and find ways to help people and these solutions should be long term.

    If people need food, a social entrepreneur won’t be thinking about giving out handouts but also about training them to have their own eco-friendly gardens so they could grow their own produce whilst protecting their environment.

    Ladies, you don’t have to be Florence Nightingale. But you can look for opportunities or approaches that have not yet been adopted in your market and implement them at home, hashtag thinking globally, acting locally.

    It’s about collaborationgiphy
    It just makes sense to do it with a squad. Social entrepreneurs not only build strong connections with people but also with other companies, entities or individuals to reach a greater number of individuals.

    Some social entrepreneurs are purely not for profit and so have to think outside of the box to ensure they are making waves in the community. This can’t be done alone. You have to look at others who might have the expertise to take your efforts further so you can get in formation.

    It’s about passion
    It would be awesome to help people, get cheddar and change lives. Yet it will be hard if you are not actually passionate about people or the solution you are trying to build. Social entrepreneurs are both community conscious and business savvy. So, you are bound to face challenges and constantly develop new ways to improve your enterprise.

    If you are not really into it, you are likely going to harm the people you are trying to save. So, if you know you care about business and driving social change concurrently more than pizza, you probably are a Motherland Mogul and a social entrepreneur.

  126. In our present world, many countries are at odds with one another. As human beings living on earth, we are like pilots of the Earth. We are responsible for the lives of a great many animals. And yet, we do nothing but wage war and produce tools to hurt each other. Originally, the earth is supposed to be our first priority

  127. With this in mind, I would like to see a world that is all one country-a world where we can go anywhere without a passport. We would be able to communicate with each other, there would be no war, and peace and public order would prevail. Because we would all be one country, there would be no need to think about gains and losses. We could use resources effectively, and it would be possible to operate industries in the most suitable environments, without being restricted by national boundaries. This would help to solve environmental problems, and would also help to prevent resources from being depleted. It would also be unnecessary to build up the military in case of disputes with other countries. This energy could be put to more constructive uses that would benefit the earth as a whole.

  128. However, we could not create such an ideal country instantly. One important reason for this is our ‘mental walls’-our discriminatory views of people from other countries. People’s way of thinking cannot be changed so easily, not even by force of law.I believe that education is essential for breaking down our mental walls. Discriminatory views are naturally passed down from parents to children, through their speech and their attitude. Children should be educated at a very young age, before discriminatory views take shape. One possible method is to make classrooms representative of the world’s peoples. In a classroom of forty students, eight would be Chinese, seven Indian, two American, oneIndonesian, and 0.8 Japanese. The ethnicities of teachers would also be distributed similarly. Then, students
    32would gain a global sense of ethics and values, as well as the knowledge needed for good management of the earth. In this kind of classroom, children would never learn to feel awkward toward people of other nationalities, and they would not develop discriminatory views. They would grow up as global human beings, able to easily accept the cultures of other countries.

  129. Adults, too, would need a transformation in consciousness to become ‘citizens of Earth.’ I think the reason why most people today think only of their own country is that there are too many people who do not realize that the Earth is one of a kind, and that human beings have to coexist with all the other living things on earth. It is not so easy to change the minds of adults, but even still, I think that all people should learn the knowledge they need to become ‘citizens of Earth.’ If all human beings learn about the present state of Earth and what they need to do as its citizens, perhaps a transformation in consciousness can be achieved. In time, the day will come when people naturally put the interests of the planet before anything else

  130. In Japan’s Warring States period, many small states fought with each other in a struggle to control territory. But today, Japan is united, and there is no one who thinks of themselves as a person from Musashi or Shimousa. While retaining the unique cultures of our different regions, we all identify as Japanese peopl

  131. The world today is much like Japan in its Warring States period, with countries at odds over their own interests. The time has come for the whole world to unite, and for us to embrace a shared identity as citizens of Earth. And just as different regions of Japan still retain their local color, becoming citizens of Earth does not mean that we have to lose our various cultures. Even while maintaining our own customs and cultures, I believe that the people of the world can be united in consciousness.

  132. f we look back on human history, our awareness of ‘the world’ has expanded from the village to the universe. Similarly, our sense of belonging should not extend only from our family to our country, but should expand to include the whole world. Perhaps we will enter an era when we naturally think of the Earth in relation to the rest of the universe. We are the crew of the single
    33ship called Earth, and this is why it is absolutely vital that we work together as one body, with a shared consciousness as ‘citizens of Earth.’ This, I feel, will lead to the future we want.

  133. I think Ephraim story above is about Creating the Future We Want

  134. And the only way is using entrepreneurship as a tool for peace

  135. Ephraim’s articles above are all sustainable, I urge all to embrace it

  136. Adults, too, would need a transformation in consciousness to become ‘citizens of Earth.’ I think the reason why most people today think only of their own country is that there are too many people who do not realize that the Earth is one of a kind, and that human beings have to coexist with all the other living things on earth. It is not so easy to change the minds of adults, but even still, I think that all people should learn the knowledge they need to become ‘citizens of Earth.’ If all human beings learn about the present state of Earth and what they need to do as its citizens, perhaps a transformation in consciousness can be achieved. In time, the day will come when people naturally put the interests of the planet before anything else

    I supported Ephraims story here

  137. with the above comments done by Ephraim i agree that we can all use it to foster peace

  138. This is a time for all of us to use this article on the blog and touch humanity.

    Do we agree?

  139. On the 75th anniversary of the United Nations and the 5th anniversary of the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals – in the midst of a pandemic radically transforming our economies and societies – this 30-minute film tells the story of the world as it is, as it was, and as it could be. Directed by renowned film maker Richard Curtis and produced by the documentary film company 72 Films, “Nations United” presents the facts, data, and opportunities we have as a human family to re-imagine and reshape the future. The film will be broadcast on numerous television channels, radio stations and streaming services around the world.

  140. The need for restructuring the economies in conflict zones needs approach that incorporates an increasing role of the private sector in protecting the interests of the public while preserving economic growth which will promotes peace in conflict torn economies by addressing urgent needs and grievances, reducing tension and the causes of conflict, and creating post conflict employment that may otherwise be lacking in these regions.

  141. One potential area of concern is where businesses primarily support one side of the conflict and leave out the other, offering job access to some people but not to others,this situation reinforces people’s frustration and marginalization and produce income inequality among individuals of different ethnic groups, thus creating the conditions for internal conflicts and civil wars.

  142. juliusanaychukwu

    28.09.2020 · Reply

    Social innovators are always looking for solutions to pressing societal issues . As a result, they have to come up with new, sustainable and inventive ways to respond to these issues. Social enterprises move past the textbook responses and find ways to help people and these solutions should be long term.

  143. One potential area of concern is where businesses primarily support one side of the conflict and leave out the other, offering job access to some people but not to others,this situation reinforces people’s frustration and marginalization and produce income inequality among individuals of different ethnic groups, thus creating the conditions for internal conflicts and civil wars.

    I agree with Boniface’s comment at this angle

  144. On the 75th anniversary of the United Nations and the 5th anniversary of the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals – in the midst of a pandemic radically transforming our economies and societies – this 30-minute film tells the story of the world as it is, as it was, and as it could be. Directed by renowned film maker Richard Curtis and produced by the documentary film company 72 Films, “Nations United” presents the facts, data, and opportunities we have as a human family to re-imagine and reshape the future. The film will be broadcast on numerous television channels, radio stations and streaming services around the world

    My thought for today align with Gregory own

  145. Building Peace through Entrepreneurship It is about increasing youth employability through support with life sustaining skills, teaching financial literacy to aid income generating activities and mitigate conflict drivers.
    Skills acquisition programmes will be embarked on in vulnerable communities and seasoned craftsmen and technicians will be engaged for skills impartation.
    This is what I find very motivating about this peace building through entrepreneurship.

  146. The future that I hope for is a future with no war, where everyone can spend their days with a beautiful smile.My own daily life is very peaceful and happy. Every day, I eat meals, study at school, and have fun with my friends, and I don’t think much about it. Especially in Japan, we have everything we need for living.

  147. I learned that in countries that are at war, every day people are frightened of bombs falling on them. They can’t get enough to eat, they can’t get medical treatment, and they often go hungry.I have never experienced war. I have only learned a little about war from reading a book. I learned that war takes away everything, it resolves nothing, and it destroys lives and breaks families apart. Nothing good comes of war. It only leaves wounds of sadness and hatred in people’s hearts. Homes are destroyed, towns are left in chaos,and plants cannot grow in the devastated land for a whole generation. Children who lost their mothers and fathers are forced to live on their own.

  148. It is very sad that even though we are all human beings and were born on the same earth, our lives are so different depending on where we live. When I read that book, I felt that I would like to create a brighter future for people who have suffered from war.Why do wars take place? When I thought about my house, my school, and my town being destroyed, and my family being separated, I felt like crying. Just thinking about it is terrible, and so, in the future, I want to do away with the tragedy of war.

  149. Rather than arguing and fighting with each other, I would like to see everyone cooperate and create somethingtogether.When all the students at my school sing a song together, it is a wonderful feeling. I am in grade 2, and when I sing with the sixth graders, their gentle voices combine with mine, making a beautiful harmony.

  150. If just one school can create such a moving harmony, imagine how powerful it would be if all the people of the world sang the same song together. I feel excited just thinking about it! And if just a song can make me feel so happy, I think that by having children and adults share more ideas,we can do much more than I could imagine.Right now, I cannot stop wars. What I can do right now is to study more and think about how to create a more livable world for everyone. What kinds of words can I offer to children who have lost their parents in a war?

    How can we grow plants and flowers on land where bombs have fallen? What can we do for people suffering from an infectious disease due to their injury? There is a lot to study and think about. I believe that we absolutely can have a future without war. I want people to realize as soon as possible that hurting each other will not bring us happiness. The joy of flowers blooming, the joy of eating delicious food, and a future where everyone in the world is smiling every day—this is the future I hope for.

  151. I support what Mr Inyang, he’s very correct.

  152. Solid contribution sir.

  153. Rather than arguing and fighting with each other, I would like to see everyone cooperate and create something together.When all the students at my school sing a song together, it is a wonderful feeling. I am in grade 2, and when I sing with the sixth graders, their gentle voices combine with mine, making a beautiful harmony.

    I agree with this comment because the comment aligns to peace.

    Campus members, do you all agree?

  154. “Those who have gone through difficult phases in their lives because of conflict due to wars or even climate-related reasons have a clear vision of how a peaceful world should be. At the same time, they have the desire to live in a conflict-free world. If those people are provided the right knowledge and skills they could turn their visions into actions. It would give a boost to global efforts for establishing a culture of peace while making possible that voices of different people were heard”.
    In the scenerio above, only social entreprises can help achieve such peace

    I agree with this comment Eduheal commented because the comment aligns to peace.

    Campus members, do you agree on that?

  155. I also see employment as another potential promotion program in conflict affected areas,we social entrepreneurs we can work hard to be (inclusive)here while still working from a ground of a dream ideas project implementation to grow in a dream and be established with that dream of social entrepreneurs, especially toward under represented minorities, and actively promoting transparency and accountability in our business design concepts model and help by ensuring all relevant beneficiaries have been consulted.
    @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/18538

  156. 2020 Theme: Shaping Peace Together
    International Day of Peace Poster

    Each year the International Day of Peace is observed around the world on 21 September. The UN General Assembly has declared this as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, through observing 24 hours of non-violence and cease-fire.

    This year, it has been clearer than ever that we are not each other’s enemies. Rather, our common enemy is a tireless virus that threatens our health, security and very way of life. COVID-19 has thrown our world into turmoil and forcibly reminded us that what happens in one part of the planet can impact people everywhere.

    In March, UN Secretary-General António Guterres called on all warring parties to lay down their weapons and focus on the battle against this unprecedented global pandemic. While the message is intended for armed parties, solidarity and cooperation across borders, sectors and generations are also needed to win this new fight against the worst public health crisis of our time.

    For the United Nations, 2020 was already meant to be a year of listening and learning. To mark its 75th anniversary, the UN has invited millions of people worldwide to join UN75, the largest and furthest-reaching global conversation on building the peaceful and prosperous future that we want.

    As we struggle to defeat COVID-19, your voice is more important than ever. In these difficult times of physical distancing, this International Day of Peace will be dedicated to fostering dialogue and collecting ideas. The world will be invited to unite and share thoughts on how to weather this storm, heal our planet and change it for the better. Even though we may not be able to stand next to each other, we can still dream together.

    The 2020 theme for the International Day of Peace is “Shaping Peace Together.” Celebrate the day by spreading compassion, kindness and hope in the face of the pandemic. Stand together with the UN against attempts to use the virus to promote discrimination or hatred. Join us so that we can shape peace together.

    Background
    The International Day of Peace was established in 1981 by the United Nations General Assembly. Two decades later, in 2001, the General Assembly unanimously voted to designate the Day as a period of non-violence and cease-fire.

    The United Nations invites all nations and people to honour a cessation of hostilities during the Day, and to otherwise commemorate the Day through education and public awareness on issues related to peace.

  157. owards the Intentional Evolution of Mankind(English translation)I am from Susa, a small town in the Colombian Andes where the economy rests on agriculture and animal breeding. My country is sadly famous worldwide: drug smuggling, violence, poverty and corruption seem to be part of an inescapable fate. Every one of us Colombians are born in that hostile environment.The problem grows deeper in the field, given its gaps and differences with the city. That is why almost no one in my generation saw their future in the field; on the contrary, they decided to go to the city and work or study in order to find employment with the government or some big enterprise in the future. I admit that I use to think the same way; we cared about making money and never considered the town’s problems, not to mention our responsibility as young men to work on a solution

  158. My father, who is a rural leader, convinced me to study Agricultural Management, which I chose initially for the lack of openings in other majors. However, in time, I grew more curious for the rural sector and I wanted to get closer to the farmers. It was not easy, since what I learned in college was very different from the local ways. I came with my computer, trying to impose my point of view and technical knowledge over the popular wisdom; then I learned to listen and value these methods that are part of my town’s most valuable heritage. I shared with them and understood the way they think and act. On those harvest evenings, interrupted
    21only by the birds’ songs or the whistle of the wind amidst the forests and crops, I understood what seemed absurd to the eyes of economists: Why do they keep farming if it’s not profitable? They do it because it’s who they are. We farmers have a body made of corn, calved by Mother Earth.

  159. I adopted their patience, the way they prepare the soil, plant the seed, look after it and wait for the harvest, which is always considered a blessing, no matter what the selling prices are. Their communitary organization and leadership is always exercised by the most helpful person, who is worthy of this responsibility because of his seriousness and service, and not the clothes he wears.This approach led me to readopt elements of the rural culture, and I started wearing ‘ruana’, ‘sombrero’ and ‘alpargates’ to college. I have been working with them for 4 years now, and today we have been chosen among the 12 towns from all over Colombia to implement a Japanese local development strategy called OVOP (‘One village, one product’) with technical support from the JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency). I had received a scholarship from the JICA before and I’m the leader of this initiative, which was also my grade thesis.When I see the progress we have achieved in returning self-confidence to the farmers, I know that the human potential has no limit.I imagine evolution as an infinite stairway where all living creatures climb towards perfection. Humans also live in constant change, and if we have been favored with rationality, it gives us the ability to choose how we want to evolve as species. While other creatures of nature change by the prevalence of the strongest in a competitive environment, human beings have consciousness and can look at their pairs as partners and not only as rivals, they can look for a more collective life project instead of just fighting for themselves

  160. I think that the next evolutionary transformation that we can go through is BROTHERHOOD. And the wonderful thing is: unlike the other living beings’ adaptations, which are caused by external factors, this change would be premeditated, which means an INTENTIONAL EVOLUTION.
    22If we overcome the nationalisms and accumulation desires, we humans can exist in a more austere and humble way, finding the sense of life in a vocation of service, which means the well-being of others.In order to achieve this INTENTIONAL EVOLUTION, it is necessary to interact more with other humans. Personally, I would have never grown professionally if I hadn’t listened to the farmers in my town; they ended up teaching me more things than I ever did to them. That is why I dream of a world where we value each other’s work and exchange roles, where a manager can be a gardener and the stock broker can fly an airplane, a cook can be a singer and the scientist can be a farmer.If we live each other’s reality, not only at a personal level, but internationally, all the problems will stop being just for one country to solve, and become challenges for the entire species.As a young man, I walk on that direction and I believe that the world I want formy children is one where we evolve in the direction of peace, justice and sustainability; where it is not necessary to build walls around cities, and no need to divide the countries between developed and underdeveloped.

  161. Wow! Ephraim’s contributions and comments towards the journey of coexistence and harmony by mavericks like me and you are authentic

    Ephraim deserve a credit

  162. Based on what Ephraim just commented few minutes back

    I think we can all collectively build peace together if we exercise compassion, empathy and trust

  163. Based on what Ephraim just commented few minutes back

    I think we can all collectively build peace together if we exercise compassion, empathy and trust
    i agree

  164. To all my fellow Nigerians in this College, I’m Sending you warm wishes on this Independence Day. Let us remember and honor the patriotism of the people who gave lives to free Nigeria.
    From Struggle… To Freedom… To Progress… Nigeria moves forward. Celebrating with you the pride of being part of a nation that is eternal and ever-new…Let us pay homage to all the brave hearts, who gave their life for the next generations. We are proud to be Nigerians! May the Pride and Glory of being Nigerian remain in your heart forever.
    May the Nigerian green and White flag always fly high, and may you be independent in your thoughts and in your deeds, in order to create a blossoming paradise that future generations will be proud of. I’m happy to be with you guys here in this College.
    Happy Independence Day, Nigeria!

    My Special thanks to the YCEC organizers!
    Thank you very much for giving us this great opportunity. To bring us together from all over the world to teach us “How to be sustainable Entrepreneurs.”
    Thank you for providing us with this awesome platform.

    Sincerely,

    Umar Imam

    CEO / Co-Founder
    Afrik Designers brand.

  165. Wow to all my fellow contestants, campus members and entrepreneurship campus team 2020, other global citizens, I want to tell you all that Today being eins Oktober Zweitausendundzwanzig 1 10 2020 is our country’s independece day, so I want all my fellow contestants to join me and Umar above and celebrate with us virtually, despite the pandemic of COVID 19, let our oxytoxin be in motion

    Guten Morgen to All

  166. The first story is about Mary Gordon. Mary is a Canadian. She was elected a Fellow just short of three years ago. She saw a problem in the classes she was teaching in the public schools in Toronto. There was increasing number of children who could only respond to another child who made them uncomfortable with aggression, which of course invited aggression back from the other child, and you can predict where all that was leading. Every time a child went through that cycle the pattern would get deeper, and the probability of that child not being able to function in a world that requires a high level of skill in dealing with others increased. And of course the probability of the school being dysfunctional increased. Because Mary is an entrepreneur, she gave herself permission to see a problem that was obvious but no one was seeing. This is a clue as to one of the first patterns. Entrepreneurs give themselves permission to see and to think and to act.

    If you are an entrepreneur, you don’t want to solve it just for the children in your class. You want to change the whole society. Well, how do you change the education system? Everywhere in the world, it is notorious for not being the most innovative or fast-moving sector. So she knew it had to be a very simple idea. I’ll jump ahead to the results. Three years later, she’s gone from 2 schools to 2,000 schools in Canada; New Zealand has adopted the idea; and she has been approached by the Government of Japan for help.

    What is her idea? She asks only for one hour a month for 8 months of a class, and the younger the children the better. She brings an infant less than one year old, plus mom, plus a green blanket. The infant is the professor. The infant sits on the green blanket. The students have the responsibility, not the teacher, for figuring out what the professor is saying and later what the professor is feeling. You can imagine the children get into this very quickly. It has a huge impact. The Canadians actually have a measurement system for bullying. After those 8 hours, bullying rates come down and stay down. You could see that this is an idea and approach that could work anywhere in the world and Mary is out to make it work everywhere in the world. So that’s Case One.

    I want to educate all today on this case one

  167. I urges all to read the way our serial entrepreneur and global business angel like Bill Dray-ton used entrepreneurship as a tool of peace through the story above

  168. I strongly agree and comply with what Ephraim has decided to educate us in the blog today

    Is a good one, keep it up Ephraim

  169. Innovation at this point does not stand for big tech or new inventions. It’s about practical and smart solutions that can improve people’s lives and help save the planet at the same time.

    Campus Members do we all agree on this.?

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