How to Support Learning for All during COVID-19 Crisis?

In a former normal day, before the coronavirus outbreak, over one billion of children all over the world would head to school. However, despite attending classes, for many of them, schooling did not equal learning. Even before the pandemic wreaked havoc worldwide on the educational system, there was a global learning crisis. Teacher gaps, crowded classes, lack of qualified and trained teachers, outdated curricula, lack of learning materials have been ongoing challenges in many countries. On the other hand, poverty was and still is a major barrier to proper learning for millions of children. Kids born and raised in poverty face various disadvantages especially in terms of education and learning. Those children that arrived at school tired, hungry, and sick couldn’t concentrate or remember information.

Consequently more than half of the children in education were unable to reach minimum proficiency. More specifically, data from UNICEF confirmed that an estimated six in every ten children and adolescents globally didn’t achieve minimum proficiency levels in reading and mathematics.

As a result, worldwide, there were more non-learners in school than out of school.

Then, the COVID-19 threatened to deepen the global learning crisis while hampering the progress made towards achieving quality education (SDG4) and exposing huge inequalities in education.
Marginalized groups, children living in poverty or conflictual areas, girls, refugees, migrant children, kids, and youth with special needs were already facing barriers to access a proper education. Educational systems are disrupted every year in various countries due to climate change, natural disasters, or wars. The pandemic added a new barrier to school attendance in those countries.
Moreover, the pandemic also threatens the progress made towards gender equality, SDG 5.
According to UNESCO, 130 million girls were out of school before the pandemic. Now, over 11 million girls face the risk of never returning back to school. Not only this, but they can also be exposed to abuse, family violence, child labor, early marriage, and trafficking. In order to ensure girls learning continuity, UNESCO shared a guide that can be used by policymakers involved with education, teachers, people involved in COVID-19 response, organization, youth-led programs, parents, girls, and women’s rights groups, etc.

The COVID-19 pandemic could force ways to reshape education for the better. The health crisis is pushing policymakers, teachers, learners, and parents to think critically and creatively, to cooperate and interact better.
At the same time, it is forcing people and especially the youth to use e-learning, a solution that has been in place for a long time but was not used to its full potential. Yet, online education is still not a universal solution. The digital divide is another major challenge. The education sector is facing a major wave of online learning, but the question is how to make it more inclusive for girls, underprivileged learners, and for children with special needs.
A way would be to take advantage of every type of media including radio, televisions, newspapers, and magazines and their role as educational mediums.

At least a third of the world’s schoolchildren unable to access remote learning during school closures, a new report says

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74 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    Supporting learning for all

    Education enables upward socioeconomic mobility and is a key to escaping poverty.

  2. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    Over the past decade, major progress was made towards increasing access to education and school enrollment rates at all levels, particularly for girls.

  3. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    Nevertheless, about 260 million children were still out of school in 2018 — nearly one fifth of the global population in that age group.

  4. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    And more than half of all children and adolescents worldwide are not meeting minimum proficiency standards in reading and mathematics.

  5. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    In 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic spread across the globe, a majority of countries announced the temporary closure of schools, impacting more than 91 per cent of students worldwide.

  6. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    By April 2020, close to 1.6 billion children and youth were out of school. And nearly 369 million children who rely on school meals needed to look to other sources for daily nutrition.

  7. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    Never before have so many children been out of school at the same time, disrupting learning and upending lives, especially the most vulnerable and marginalised.

  8. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    The global pandemic has far-reaching consequences that may jeopardize hard won gains made in improving global education.

  9. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    The COVID 19 response
    In an effort to foster international collaboration and ensure that education never stops, UNESCO is mounting a response with a set of initiatives that include the global monitoring of national and localized school closures.

  10. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    To protect the well-being of children and ensure they have access to continued learning, UNESCO in March 2020 launched the COVID-19 Global Education Coalition, a multi-sector partnership between the UN family, civil society organizations, media and IT partners to design and deploy innovative solutions.

  11. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    Together they help countries tackle content and connectivity gaps, and facilitate inclusive learning opportunities for children and youth during this period of sudden and unprecedented educational disruption.

  12. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    Specifically, the Global Education Coalition aims to:

    Help countries in mobilizing resources and implementing innovative and context-appropriate solutions to provide education remotely, leveraging hi-tech, low-tech and no-tech approaches;
    Seek equitable solutions and universal access;
    Ensure coordinated responses and avoid overlapping efforts;
    Facilitate the return of students to school when they reopen to avoid an upsurge in dropout rates.
    UNICEF also scaled up its work in 145 low- and middle-income countries to support governments and education partners in developing plans for a rapid, system-wide response including alternative learning programmes and mental health support.

  13. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    How to Support Learning for All during COVID-19 Crisis? How to cope in times of crises

  14. Facts and figures

    Before the coronavirus crisis, projections showed that more than 200 million children would be out of school, and only 60 per cent of young people would be completing upper secondary education in 2030.

  15. Before the coronavirus crisis, the proportion of children and youth out of primary and secondary school had declined from 26 per cent in 2000 to 19 per cent in 2010 and 17 per cent in 2018.

  16. More than half of children that have not enrolled in school live in sub-Saharan Africa, and more than 85 per cent of children in sub-Saharan Africa are not learning the minimum
    617 million youth worldwide lack basic mathematics and literacy skills.

  17. Some 750 million adults – two thirds of them women – remained illiterate in 2016. Half of the global illiterate population lives in South Asia, and a quarter live in sub-Saharan Africa.
    In 10 low- and middle-income countries, children with disabilities were 19per cent less likely to achieve minimum proficiency in reading than those without disabilities.
    4 million refugee children were out of school in 2017

  18. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world.

  19. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    There has been progress over the last decades: More girls are going to school, fewer girls are forced into early marriage, more women are serving in parliament and positions of leadership, and laws are being reformed to advance gender equality.

  20. Anonymous

    28.08.2020 · Reply

    Despite these gains, many challenges remain: discriminatory laws and social norms remain pervasive, women continue to be underrepresented at all levels of political leadership, and 1 in 5 women and girls between the ages of 15 and 49 report experiencing physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner within a 12-month period.

    The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic could reverse the limited progress that has been made on gender equality and women’s rights. The coronavirus outbreak exacerbates existing inequalities for women and girls across every sphere – from health and the economy, to security and social protection.

    Women play a disproportionate role in responding to the virus, including as frontline healthcare workers and carers at home. Women’s unpaid care work has increased significantly as a result of school closures and the increased needs of older people. Women are also harder hit by the economic impacts of COVID-19, as they disproportionately work in insecure labour markets. Nearly 60 per cent of women work in the informal economy, which puts them at greater risk of falling into poverty.

    The pandemic has also led to a steep increase in violence against women and girls. With lockdown measures in place, many women are trapped at home with their abusers, struggling to access services that are suffering from cuts and restrictions. Emerging data shows that, since the outbreak of the pandemic, violence against women and girls – and particularly domestic violence – has intensified.

  21. n a former normal day, before the coronavirus outbreak, over one billion of children all over the world would head to school. However, despite attending classes, for many of them, schooling did not equal learning. Even before the pandemic wreaked havoc worldwide on the educational system, there was a global learning crisis. Teacher gaps, crowded classes, lack of qualified and trained teachers, outdated curricula, lack of learning materials have been ongoing challenges in many countries. On the other hand, poverty was and still is a major barrier to proper learning for millions of children. Kids born and raised in poverty face various disadvantages especially in terms of education and learning. Those children that arrived at school tired, hungry, and sick couldn’t concentrate or remember information.

    Consequently more than half of the children in education were unable to reach minimum proficiency. More specifically, data from UNICEF confirmed that an estimated six in every ten children and adolescents globally didn’t achieve minimum proficiency levels in reading and mathematics.

    As a result, worldwide, there were more non-learners in school than out of school.

    let us take a look at this article

  22. Despite these gains, many challenges remain: discriminatory laws and social norms remain pervasive, women continue to be underrepresented at all levels of political leadership, and 1 in 5 women and girls between the ages of 15 and 49 report experiencing physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner within a 12-month period.

    The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic could reverse the limited progress that has been made on gender equality and women’s rights. The coronavirus outbreak exacerbates existing inequalities for women and girls across every sphere – from health and the economy, to security and social protection.

    Women play a disproportionate role in responding to the virus, including as frontline healthcare workers and carers at home. Women’s unpaid care work has increased significantly as a result of school closures and the increased needs of older people. Women are also harder hit by the economic impacts of COVID-19, as they disproportionately work in insecure labour markets. Nearly 60 per cent of women work in the informal economy, which puts them at greater risk of falling into poverty.

    The pandemic has also led to a steep increase in violence against women and girls. With lockdown measures in place, many women are trapped at home with their abusers, struggling to access services that are suffering from cuts and restrictions. Emerging data shows that, since the outbreak of the pandemic, violence against women and girls – and particularly domestic violence – has intensified.

    I supported and agree with Julius here

  23. Supporting learning for all

    Education enables upward socioeconomic mobility and is a key to escaping poverty.

    I want us to look at this and examine, refine and question our creative ideas and projects before taking on a sustainable journey of implementation

    Campus members are you inspires by my comment?

  24. How to Support Learning for All during COVID-19 Crisis?

    Published on: 28.08.2020

    How I wish that every contestants 2020 will comply with me and take the online training and as well as BvC and SEC courses and they will realize that this blog’s solutions lies in our hand a sort that Leonardo da Vinci said that Simplicity lies in the ultimate acomplishment

    Auf wiedwesehen

    Guten Abend

  25. In 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic spread across the globe, a majority of countries announced the temporary closure of schools, impacting more than 91 per cent of students worldwide. By April 2020, close to 1.6 billion children and youth were out of school. And nearly 369 million children who rely on school meals needed to look to other sources for daily nutrition.

    Never before have so many children been out of school at the same time, disrupting learning and upending lives, especially the most vulnerable and marginalised. The global pandemic has far-reaching consequences that may jeopardize hard won gains made in improving global education.

  26. How l wish all contestants will learn from above article.

    At the same time, it is forcing people and especially the youth to use e-learning, a solution that has been in place for a long time but was not used to its full potential. Yet, online education is still not a universal solution. The digital divide is another major challenge. The education sector is facing a major wave of online learning, but the question is how to make it more inclusive for girls, underprivileged learners, and for children with special needs.
    A way would be to take advantage of every type of media including radio, televisions, newspapers, and magazines and their role as educational mediums.

  27. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    COVID 19 response to goal 5

    Limited gains in gender equality and women’s rights made over the decades are in danger of being rolled back due to the COVID-19 pandemic,” the UN Secretary-General said in April 2020, urging governments to put women and girls at the centre of their recovery efforts.

  28. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    Women are not only the hardest hit by this pandemic, they are also the backbone of recovery in communities.

  29. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    Putting women and girls at the centre of economies will fundamentally drive better and more sustainable development outcomes for all, support a more rapid recovery, and place the world back on a footing to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

  30. The COVID-19 pandemic could force ways to reshape education for the better. The health crisis is pushing policymakers, teachers, learners, and parents to think critically and creatively, to cooperate and interact better.

  31. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    Every COVID-19 response plans, and every recovery package and budgeting of resources, needs to address the gender impacts of this pandemic.

  32. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    This means: (1) including women and women’s organizations in COVID-19 response planning and decision-making; (2) transforming the inequities of unpaid care work into a new, inclusive care economy that works for everyone; and (3) designing socio-economic plans with an intentional focus on the lives and futures of women and girls.

  33. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    UN Women has developed a rapid and targeted response to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on women and girls and to ensure that the long-term recovery benefits them, focused on five priorities:

  34. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    Gender-based violence, including domestic violence, is mitigated and reduced
    Social protection and economic stimulus packages serve women and girls
    People support and practise equal sharing of care work
    Women and girls lead and participate in COVID-19 response planning and decision-making
    Data and coordination mechanisms include gender perspectives

  35. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity for radical, positive action to redress long-standing inequalities in multiple areas of women’s lives, and build a more just and resilient world.

  36. According to UNESCO, 130 million girls were out of school before the pandemic.

  37. Now, over 11 million girls face the risk of never returning back to school.

  38. Not only this, but they can also be exposed to abuse, family violence, child labor, early marriage, and trafficking.

  39. In order to ensure girls learning continuity, UNESCO shared a guide that can be used by policymakers involved with education, teachers, people involved in COVID-19 response, organization, youth-led programs, parents, girls, and women’s rights groups, etc.

  40. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) defines a green economy as “one which is low carbon, resource efficient and socially inclusive.” … They claim that green economics’ attempts to decouple economic growth from environmental destruction have not been very successful. When a green economy is guaranteed, every other aspect of problems including pandemic will be solved

  41. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    Did we know?
    Consequently more than half of the children in education were unable to reach minimum proficiency.

  42. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    More specifically, data from UNICEF confirmed that an estimated six in every ten children and adolescents globally didn’t achieve minimum proficiency levels in reading and mathematics.

  43. Anonymous

    29.08.2020 · Reply

    As a result, worldwide, there were more non-learners in school than out of school.

  44. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    COVID-19: At least a third of the world’s schoolchildren unable to access remote learning during school closures, new report says

  45. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    UNICEF’s Reimagine campaign calls for urgent investment to bridge the digital divide, reach every child with remote learning, and, most critically, prioritize the safe reopening of schools

  46. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    NEW YORK, 27 August 2020 – At least a third of the world’s schoolchildren – 463 million children globally – were unable to access remote learning when COVID-19 shuttered their schools, according to a new UNICEF report released today as countries across the world grapple with their ‘back-to-school’ plans.

  47. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    “For at least 463 million children whose schools closed due to COVID-19, there was no such a thing as remote learning,” said Henrietta Fore, UNICEF Executive Director.

  48. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    “The sheer number of children whose education was completely disrupted for months on end is a global education emergency.

  49. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    The repercussions could be felt in economies and societies for decades to come.”

  50. COVID-19 indeed has highten the lack of access to many children; this time those that were previiusly learning, girls already disadvantaged and many other children that have not even got any access to learning. This is the gap that my idea “Eduheal seek to bridge” with different educational channels. thank you campus administrator for opening my eyes to the use of print media.

    • Anonymous

      31.08.2020 · Reply

      Your comment is indeed stimulating. Keep it up!

  51. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    At the height of nationwide and local lockdowns, around 1.5 billion schoolchildren were affected by school closures.

  52. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    The report outlines the limitations of remote learning and exposes deep inequalities in access

  53. The report uses a globally representative analysis on the availability of home-based technology and tools needed for remote learning among pre-primary, primary, lower-secondary and upper-secondary schoolchildren, with data from 100 countries.

  54. Data include access to television, radio and internet, and the availability of curriculum delivered across these platforms during school closures.

  55. Although the numbers in the report present a concerning picture on the lack of remote learning during school closures, UNICEF warns the situation is likely far worse.

  56. Even when children have the technology and tools at home, they may not be able to learn remotely through those platforms due to competing factors in the home including pressure to do chores, being forced to work, a poor environment for learning and lack of support in using the online or broadcast curriculum.

  57. The report highlights significant inequality across regions. Schoolchildren in sub-Saharan Africa are the most affected, where at least half of all students cannot be reached with remote learning.

  58. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    Schoolchildren from the poorest households and those living in rural areas are by far the most likely to miss out during closures, the report says.

  59. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    Globally, 72 per cent of schoolchildren unable to access remote learning live in their countries’ poorest households.

  60. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    In upper-middle-income countries, schoolchildren from the poorest households account for up to 86 per cent of students unable to access remote learning. Globally, three quarters of schoolchildren without access live in rural areas.

  61. Anonymous

    30.08.2020 · Reply

    One way to support learning for all during COVID-19 crises is to promote online apps and websites so educative like the ‘YouTube Kids’.

  62. “The COVID-19 threatened to deepen the global learning crisis while hampering the progress made towards achieving quality education (SDG4) and exposing huge inequalities in education.
    Marginalized groups, children living in poverty or conflictual areas, girls, refugees, migrant children, kids, and youth with special needs were already facing barriers to access a proper education. Educational systems are disrupted every year in various countries due to climate change, natural disasters, or wars. The pandemic added a new barrier to school attendance in those countries.
    Moreover, the pandemic also threatens the progress made towards gender equality, SDG 5.
    According to UNESCO, 130 million girls were out of school before the pandemic. Now, over 11 million girls face the risk of never returning back to school. Not only this, but they can also be exposed to abuse, family violence, child labor, early marriage, and trafficking. In order to ensure girls learning continuity, UNESCO shared a guide that can be used by policymakers involved with education, teachers, people involved in COVID-19 response, organization, youth-led programs, parents, girls, and women’s rights groups” etc.

    The above statement is a stark fact of educational inequalit heighten again by COVID 1. In Nigeria, my country, there are numerous calls against rape of the girl-child following their continued stay at home arising from COVID 19 lockdown. accessibility to education need to be an imperative of every government and policy makers. Andd as rightly stated by this article different channels of making eduation accessible should be employed. one od such ideas promoting this during this COVID-19 is “Eduheal”, Blossom Odor’s idea assisting children to learn as much as possible during and after the pandemic through local radio and television, social media platforms etc.

    Please support this noble venture

    • Anonymous

      31.08.2020 · Reply

      Your comment is indeed stimulating. Keep it up!

  63. How to Support Learning for All during COVID-19 Crisis?

    Published on: 28.08.2020

    We can create our platform through our diverse ideas like this one entrepreneurship campus

  64. “The COVID-19 threatened to deepen the global learning crisis while hampering the progress made towards achieving quality education (SDG4) and exposing huge inequalities in education.
    Marginalized groups, children living in poverty or conflictual areas, girls, refugees, migrant children, kids, and youth with special needs were already facing barriers to access a proper education. Educational systems are disrupted every year in various countries due to climate change, natural disasters, or wars. The pandemic added a new barrier to school attendance in those countries.
    Moreover, the pandemic also threatens the progress made towards gender equality, SDG 5.
    According to UNESCO, 130 million girls were out of school before the pandemic. Now, over 11 million girls face the risk of never returning back to school. Not only this, but they can also be exposed to abuse, family violence, child labor, early marriage, and trafficking. In order to ensure girls learning continuity, UNESCO shared a guide that can be used by policymakers involved with education, teachers, people involved in COVID-19 response, organization, youth-led programs, parents, girls, and women’s rights groups” etc.

    The above statement is a stark fact of educational inequalit heighten again by COVID 1. In Nigeria, my country, there are numerous calls against rape of the girl-child following their continued stay at home arising from COVID 19 lockdown. accessibility to education need to be an imperative of every government and policy makers. And as rightly stated by this article different channels of making education accessible should be employed. one od such ideas promoting this during this COVID-19 is “Eduheal”, Blossom Odor’s idea assisting children to learn as much as possible during and after the pandemic through local radio and television, social media platforms etc.

    Please support this noble venture

    i jointly support both Blossom and Togeda as well, let us join them

  65. Did you know that Richard Branson said in his 32 quote, Education does not just take place in stuffy classrooms and university buildings, it can happen everywhere, every day to every person, so i support this serial entrepreneur because COVID 19 can never be a barrier to us global citizens

  66. Do you know that,

    More than 617 million children and adolescents are not achieving minimum proficiency levels (MPLs) in reading and mathematics, according to new estimates from the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS). This is the equivalent of three times the population of Brazil being unable to read or undertake basic mathematics with proficiency. The new data signal a tremendous waste of human potential that could threaten progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Many of the global goals depend on the achievement of SDG 4, which demands an inclusive and equitable quality education and the promotion of “lifelong learning opportunities for all”. In particular, Target 4.1 demands that all children complete primary and secondary education of sufficient quality to ensure that they have “relevant and effective learning outcomes”. To measure progress globally, the international community has agreed to use following indicator: Proportion of children and young people: (a) in Grades 2 or 3; (b) at the end of primary education; and (c) at the end of lower secondary education achieving at least a minimum proficiency level in (i) reading and (ii) mathematics.

  67. Globally, six out of ten children and adolescents are not achieving minimum proficiency levels in reading and mathematics (see Figure 1 for reading and AnnexTable A1 for mathematics). The total – 617 million – includes more than 387 million children of primary school age (about 6 to 11 years old) and 230 million adolescents of lower secondary school age (about 12 to 14 years old). This means that more than one-half – 56% – of all children won’t be able to read or handle mathematics with proficiency by the time they are of age to complete primary education. The proportion is even higher for adolescents, with 61% unable to achieve minimum proficiency levels when they should be completing lower secondary school.

  68. Consequently more than half of the children in education were unable to reach minimum proficiency. More specifically, data from UNICEF confirmed that an estimated six in every ten children and adolescents globally didn’t achieve minimum proficiency levels in reading and mathematics. That’s poor isn’t it?

  69. How to Support Learning for All during COVID-19 Crisis?
    See relevant ideas at these blogs:
    * coronavirus-impact-on-education-and-digital-learning-solutions
    * education-solutions-in-a-global-crisis
    * what-else-is-happening-in-the-world-amid-covid-19-crisis
    * covid-19-and-the-un-sustainable-development-goals
    * how-to-stay-positive-during-covid-19-lockdown
    * covid-19-threats-to-food-security
    * join-building-peace-and-covid-19-webinar
    * online-education-and-lessons-learned-from-covid-19
    * how-will-covid-19-will-affect-consumerism?
    * how-can-social-entrepreneurship-reduce-inequalities?
    * new-ideas-and-covid-19-innovating-to-thrive

  70. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    I strongly agree with the above comments and l want you all to make it your own.

  71. Anonymous

    31.08.2020 · Reply

    Your comment is indeed stimulating. Keep it up!

  72. Shedrach aifuwa

    26.09.2020 · Reply

    Education is key, and at times like these we need alternatives that will not only meet our previous records but also surpass it, we must come up with ways of improving E-learning so it achieve it’s absolute potential.

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