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October 13, 2020 20:13

More absurdly still, nations routinely import and export almost identical quantities of identical products. Just two examples: According to recent figures, the United States imports about 365,000 tons of potatoes, and exports 325,000 tons, while the UK imports 114,000 tons of milk and exports 119,000 tons. These are not special cases or statistical freaks: they are the norm. At a time of impending climate chaos brought about by the burning of fossil fuels, they represent an economy on the edge of madness.

October 13, 2020 20:13

More absurdly still, nations routinely import and export almost identical quantities of identical products. Just two examples: According to recent figures, the United States imports about 365,000 tons of potatoes, and exports 325,000 tons, while the UK imports 114,000 tons of milk and exports 119,000 tons. These are not special cases or statistical freaks: they are the norm. At a time of impending climate chaos brought about by the burning of fossil fuels, they represent an economy on the edge of madness.

October 13, 2020 20:13

More absurdly still, nations routinely import and export almost identical quantities of identical products. Just two examples: According to recent figures, the United States imports about 365,000 tons of potatoes, and exports 325,000 tons, while the UK imports 114,000 tons of milk and exports 119,000 tons. These are not special cases or statistical freaks: they are the norm. At a time of impending climate chaos brought about by the burning of fossil fuels, they represent an economy on the edge of madness.

October 13, 2020 20:13

In the supermarkets of Australia, Californian oranges are cheaper than Australian oranges. In the modern stores of Ladakh, butter that has to be trucked in over the Himalayas is cheaper than butter from the farm a mile away. In England, roofing slate from China costs less than Welsh slate.

October 13, 2020 20:13

In the supermarkets of Australia, Californian oranges are cheaper than Australian oranges. In the modern stores of Ladakh, butter that has to be trucked in over the Himalayas is cheaper than butter from the farm a mile away. In England, roofing slate from China costs less than Welsh slate.

October 13, 2020 20:13

In the supermarkets of Australia, Californian oranges are cheaper than Australian oranges. In the modern stores of Ladakh, butter that has to be trucked in over the Himalayas is cheaper than butter from the farm a mile away. In England, roofing slate from China costs less than Welsh slate.

October 13, 2020 20:12

while export grants and other direct supports make it easier and more profitable for businesses to engage in long distance trade. The end result is that goods from the other side of the world often sell for substantially less than the same goods produced locally.

October 13, 2020 20:12

while export grants and other direct supports make it easier and more profitable for businesses to engage in long distance trade. The end result is that goods from the other side of the world often sell for substantially less than the same goods produced locally.

October 13, 2020 20:12

while export grants and other direct supports make it easier and more profitable for businesses to engage in long distance trade. The end result is that goods from the other side of the world often sell for substantially less than the same goods produced locally.

October 13, 2020 20:12

About fifteen years ago, we produced a report entitled, Small is Beautiful, Big is Subsidized. The title really says it all. Vast amounts of taxpayers money are spent on providing the infrastructure required for the global economy the roads, the airports, the telecommunications