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October 13, 2020 20:03

The streets are now choked with traffic, and the air tastes of diesel fumes. The once pristine streams are polluted, the water undrinkable. For the first time, some people are even homeless. Unemployment an unimaginable concept in the traditional culture is now widespread, while friction between different ethnic and religious groups, virtually unknown in the past five hundred years, is on the rise

October 13, 2020 20:03

The streets are now choked with traffic, and the air tastes of diesel fumes. The once pristine streams are polluted, the water undrinkable. For the first time, some people are even homeless. Unemployment an unimaginable concept in the traditional culture is now widespread, while friction between different ethnic and religious groups, virtually unknown in the past five hundred years, is on the rise

October 13, 2020 20:03

The streets are now choked with traffic, and the air tastes of diesel fumes. The once pristine streams are polluted, the water undrinkable. For the first time, some people are even homeless. Unemployment an unimaginable concept in the traditional culture is now widespread, while friction between different ethnic and religious groups, virtually unknown in the past five hundred years, is on the rise

October 13, 2020 20:01

Political power has been centralized in Leh, the capital, and a dependence created on an outside money economy. Tragically, the Ladakhis have been made to think of themselves and their culture as backward and inferior, and have been encouraged to embrace a Western, urban lifestyle. Over the course of twenty years, I have watched Leh turn into an urban sprawl.

October 13, 2020 20:01

Political power has been centralized in Leh, the capital, and a dependence created on an outside money economy. Tragically, the Ladakhis have been made to think of themselves and their culture as backward and inferior, and have been encouraged to embrace a Western, urban lifestyle. Over the course of twenty years, I have watched Leh turn into an urban sprawl.

October 13, 2020 20:01

Political power has been centralized in Leh, the capital, and a dependence created on an outside money economy. Tragically, the Ladakhis have been made to think of themselves and their culture as backward and inferior, and have been encouraged to embrace a Western, urban lifestyle. Over the course of twenty years, I have watched Leh turn into an urban sprawl.

October 13, 2020 20:01

Over the last three decades or so, Ladakh has been increasingly opened up to economic development, exposing the people to a range of outside influences they had not encountered before: advertising and corporate media, tourism, pesticides, western-style schooling, and consumer goods.

October 13, 2020 20:01

Over the last three decades or so, Ladakh has been increasingly opened up to economic development, exposing the people to a range of outside influences they had not encountered before: advertising and corporate media, tourism, pesticides, western-style schooling, and consumer goods.

October 13, 2020 20:00

Over the last three decades or so, Ladakh has been increasingly opened up to economic development, exposing the people to a range of outside influences they had not encountered before: advertising and corporate media, tourism, pesticides, western-style schooling, and consumer goods.

October 13, 2020 20:00

As in other traditional cultures, the Ladakhis also had a deep connection to the land. People depended on the living world around them for their basic needs; with few exceptions, their food, clothing and shelter were all produced within the region. Most necessities were met within walking distance. You knew the land intimately, you knew its limits; and you knew how to live with the land in a sustainable way.