Comments

October 30, 2020 17:30

Dear Paul. today being the last day for voting and commenting, I am excited to drop a comment with you in appreciation for all your support, encouragement and suggestions on my idea. You really made a great input on my idea and I do appreciate everything and time we have had in this campus. Hope to connect, share, network and collaborate after now. For now, bye and stay safe.

Comment on: SmartDia
October 30, 2020 17:07

My dear Campus [email protected], I am very much grateful for your immense support while we are together in this campus. I appreciate your votes and comments on my idea and will never take this for granted. More so, today being the last day for the cvoting and commenting phase in the competition, I am sharing with you as indicated in one of the articles on this campus, some of the things that can likely put an end to our startups. The essence is for us to guide against them as possible as we can if we want to change the world through our businesses.
Often times we only consider the factors that lead to the success of a startup; however, these are the common factors that we may often overlook that lead to the failure of startups:

1. Being inflexible and not actively seeking or using customer feedback
Ignoring your users is a tried and true way to fail. This was the number one reason given for failure amongst 32 startup failure post-mortems being analyzed. Tunnel vision and not gathering user feedback are fatal flaws for most startups. For instance, ecrowds, a web content management system company, said that: We spent way too much time building it for ourselves and not getting feedback from prospects.

2. Building a solution looking for a problem.
Choosing to tackle problems that are interesting to solve rather than those that serve a market need has often been cited as a reason for failure.

3. Not the right team
A diverse team with different skill sets has also been cited as being critical to the success of a startup company. Team deficiencies have been given as a reason for startup failure almost one quarter of the time.

4. Poor Marketing
Knowing your target audience and knowing how to get their attention and convert them to leads and ultimately customers is one of the most important skills of a successful business. Yet, in almost 30 percent of failures, ineffective marketing was a primary cause of failure. Oftentimes, the inability to market was a function of founders who liked to code or build product but who did not relish the idea of promoting the product. The folks at Devver highlighted the need to find someone who enjoys creating and finding distribution channels and developing business relationship for the company as a key need that startups should ensure they fill.

5. Ran out of cash
Money and time are finite and need to be allocated judiciously. The question of how should you spend your money was a frequent conundrum and reason for failure cited by failed startups. The decision on whether to spend significantly upfront to get the product off the group or develop gradually over time is a tough act to balance. The team at YouCastr cited money problems as the reason for failure but went on to highlight other reasons for shutting down versus trying to raise more money writing:
The single biggest reason we are closing down (a common one) is running out of cash. Despite putting the company in an EXTREMELY lean position, generating revenue, and holding out as long as we could, we did not have the cash to keep going. The next few reasons shed more light as to why we chose to shut down

I hope you will derive some benefits from this.

Finally, I have voted and commented on your idea; please consider supporting my idea with your votes and comments @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17094/

Best of luck in your implementation.

October 30, 2020 17:06

My dear Campus member, I am very much grateful for your immense support while we are together in this campus. I appreciate your votes and comments on my idea and will never take this for granted. More so, today being the last day for the cvoting and commenting phase in the competition, I am sharing with you as indicated in one of the articles on this campus, some of the things that can likely put an end to our startups. The essence is for us to guide against them as possible as we can if we want to change the world through our businesses.
Often times we only consider the factors that lead to the success of a startup; however, these are the common factors that we may often overlook that lead to the failure of startups:

1. Being inflexible and not actively seeking or using customer feedback
Ignoring your users is a tried and true way to fail. This was the number one reason given for failure amongst 32 startup failure post-mortems being analyzed. Tunnel vision and not gathering user feedback are fatal flaws for most startups. For instance, ecrowds, a web content management system company, said that: We spent way too much time building it for ourselves and not getting feedback from prospects.

2. Building a solution looking for a problem.
Choosing to tackle problems that are interesting to solve rather than those that serve a market need has often been cited as a reason for failure.

3. Not the right team
A diverse team with different skill sets has also been cited as being critical to the success of a startup company. Team deficiencies have been given as a reason for startup failure almost one quarter of the time.

4. Poor Marketing
Knowing your target audience and knowing how to get their attention and convert them to leads and ultimately customers is one of the most important skills of a successful business. Yet, in almost 30 percent of failures, ineffective marketing was a primary cause of failure. Oftentimes, the inability to market was a function of founders who liked to code or build product but who did not relish the idea of promoting the product. The folks at Devver highlighted the need to find someone who enjoys creating and finding distribution channels and developing business relationship for the company as a key need that startups should ensure they fill.

5. Ran out of cash
Money and time are finite and need to be allocated judiciously. The question of how should you spend your money was a frequent conundrum and reason for failure cited by failed startups. The decision on whether to spend significantly upfront to get the product off the group or develop gradually over time is a tough act to balance. The team at YouCastr cited money problems as the reason for failure but went on to highlight other reasons for shutting down versus trying to raise more money writing:
The single biggest reason we are closing down (a common one) is running out of cash. Despite putting the company in an EXTREMELY lean position, generating revenue, and holding out as long as we could, we did not have the cash to keep going. The next few reasons shed more light as to why we chose to shut down

I hope you will derive some benefits from this.

Finally, I have voted and commented on your idea; please consider supporting my idea with your votes and comments @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17094/

Best of luck in your implementation.

October 30, 2020 17:04

My dear Campus [email protected], I am very much grateful for your immense support while we are together in this campus. I appreciate your votes and comments on my idea and will never take this for granted. More so, today being the last day for the cvoting and commenting phase in the competition, I am sharing with you as indicated in one of the articles on this campus, some of the things that can likely put an end to our startups. The essence is for us to guide against them as possible as we can if we want to change the world through our businesses.
Often times we only consider the factors that lead to the success of a startup; however, these are the common factors that we may often overlook that lead to the failure of startups:

1. Being inflexible and not actively seeking or using customer feedback
Ignoring your users is a tried and true way to fail. This was the number one reason given for failure amongst 32 startup failure post-mortems being analyzed. Tunnel vision and not gathering user feedback are fatal flaws for most startups. For instance, ecrowds, a web content management system company, said that: We spent way too much time building it for ourselves and not getting feedback from prospects.

2. Building a solution looking for a problem.
Choosing to tackle problems that are interesting to solve rather than those that serve a market need has often been cited as a reason for failure.

3. Not the right team
A diverse team with different skill sets has also been cited as being critical to the success of a startup company. Team deficiencies have been given as a reason for startup failure almost one quarter of the time.

4. Poor Marketing
Knowing your target audience and knowing how to get their attention and convert them to leads and ultimately customers is one of the most important skills of a successful business. Yet, in almost 30 percent of failures, ineffective marketing was a primary cause of failure. Oftentimes, the inability to market was a function of founders who liked to code or build product but who did not relish the idea of promoting the product. The folks at Devver highlighted the need to find someone who enjoys creating and finding distribution channels and developing business relationship for the company as a key need that startups should ensure they fill.

5. Ran out of cash
Money and time are finite and need to be allocated judiciously. The question of how should you spend your money was a frequent conundrum and reason for failure cited by failed startups. The decision on whether to spend significantly upfront to get the product off the group or develop gradually over time is a tough act to balance. The team at YouCastr cited money problems as the reason for failure but went on to highlight other reasons for shutting down versus trying to raise more money writing:
The single biggest reason we are closing down (a common one) is running out of cash. Despite putting the company in an EXTREMELY lean position, generating revenue, and holding out as long as we could, we did not have the cash to keep going. The next few reasons shed more light as to why we chose to shut down

I hope you will derive some benefits from this.

Finally, I have voted and commented on your idea; please consider supporting my idea with your votes and comments @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17094/

Best of luck in your implementation.

Comment on: SOS Food Bank
October 30, 2020 17:03

My dear Campus [email protected], I am very much grateful for your immense support while we are together in this campus. I appreciate your votes and comments on my idea and will never take this for granted. More so, today being the last day for the cvoting and commenting phase in the competition, I am sharing with you as indicated in one of the articles on this campus, some of the things that can likely put an end to our startups. The essence is for us to guide against them as possible as we can if we want to change the world through our businesses.
Often times we only consider the factors that lead to the success of a startup; however, these are the common factors that we may often overlook that lead to the failure of startups:

1. Being inflexible and not actively seeking or using customer feedback
Ignoring your users is a tried and true way to fail. This was the number one reason given for failure amongst 32 startup failure post-mortems being analyzed. Tunnel vision and not gathering user feedback are fatal flaws for most startups. For instance, ecrowds, a web content management system company, said that: We spent way too much time building it for ourselves and not getting feedback from prospects.

2. Building a solution looking for a problem.
Choosing to tackle problems that are interesting to solve rather than those that serve a market need has often been cited as a reason for failure.

3. Not the right team
A diverse team with different skill sets has also been cited as being critical to the success of a startup company. Team deficiencies have been given as a reason for startup failure almost one quarter of the time.

4. Poor Marketing
Knowing your target audience and knowing how to get their attention and convert them to leads and ultimately customers is one of the most important skills of a successful business. Yet, in almost 30 percent of failures, ineffective marketing was a primary cause of failure. Oftentimes, the inability to market was a function of founders who liked to code or build product but who did not relish the idea of promoting the product. The folks at Devver highlighted the need to find someone who enjoys creating and finding distribution channels and developing business relationship for the company as a key need that startups should ensure they fill.

5. Ran out of cash
Money and time are finite and need to be allocated judiciously. The question of how should you spend your money was a frequent conundrum and reason for failure cited by failed startups. The decision on whether to spend significantly upfront to get the product off the group or develop gradually over time is a tough act to balance. The team at YouCastr cited money problems as the reason for failure but went on to highlight other reasons for shutting down versus trying to raise more money writing:
The single biggest reason we are closing down (a common one) is running out of cash. Despite putting the company in an EXTREMELY lean position, generating revenue, and holding out as long as we could, we did not have the cash to keep going. The next few reasons shed more light as to why we chose to shut down

I hope you will derive some benefits from this.

Finally, I have voted and commented on your idea; please consider supporting my idea with your votes and comments @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17094/

Best of luck in your implementation.

Comment on: Soup of eggshell(hen)
October 30, 2020 17:02

My dear Campus [email protected], I am very much grateful for your immense support while we are together in this campus. I appreciate your votes and comments on my idea and will never take this for granted. More so, today being the last day for the cvoting and commenting phase in the competition, I am sharing with you as indicated in one of the articles on this campus, some of the things that can likely put an end to our startups. The essence is for us to guide against them as possible as we can if we want to change the world through our businesses.
Often times we only consider the factors that lead to the success of a startup; however, these are the common factors that we may often overlook that lead to the failure of startups:

1. Being inflexible and not actively seeking or using customer feedback
Ignoring your users is a tried and true way to fail. This was the number one reason given for failure amongst 32 startup failure post-mortems being analyzed. Tunnel vision and not gathering user feedback are fatal flaws for most startups. For instance, ecrowds, a web content management system company, said that: We spent way too much time building it for ourselves and not getting feedback from prospects.

2. Building a solution looking for a problem.
Choosing to tackle problems that are interesting to solve rather than those that serve a market need has often been cited as a reason for failure.

3. Not the right team
A diverse team with different skill sets has also been cited as being critical to the success of a startup company. Team deficiencies have been given as a reason for startup failure almost one quarter of the time.

4. Poor Marketing
Knowing your target audience and knowing how to get their attention and convert them to leads and ultimately customers is one of the most important skills of a successful business. Yet, in almost 30 percent of failures, ineffective marketing was a primary cause of failure. Oftentimes, the inability to market was a function of founders who liked to code or build product but who did not relish the idea of promoting the product. The folks at Devver highlighted the need to find someone who enjoys creating and finding distribution channels and developing business relationship for the company as a key need that startups should ensure they fill.

5. Ran out of cash
Money and time are finite and need to be allocated judiciously. The question of how should you spend your money was a frequent conundrum and reason for failure cited by failed startups. The decision on whether to spend significantly upfront to get the product off the group or develop gradually over time is a tough act to balance. The team at YouCastr cited money problems as the reason for failure but went on to highlight other reasons for shutting down versus trying to raise more money writing:
The single biggest reason we are closing down (a common one) is running out of cash. Despite putting the company in an EXTREMELY lean position, generating revenue, and holding out as long as we could, we did not have the cash to keep going. The next few reasons shed more light as to why we chose to shut down

I hope you will derive some benefits from this.

Finally, I have voted and commented on your idea; please consider supporting my idea with your votes and comments @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17094/

Best of luck in your implementation.

October 30, 2020 17:00

My dear Campus [email protected], I am very much grateful for your immense support while we are together in this campus. I appreciate your votes and comments on my idea and will never take this for granted. More so, today being the last day for the cvoting and commenting phase in the competition, I am sharing with you as indicated in one of the articles on this campus, some of the things that can likely put an end to our startups. The essence is for us to guide against them as possible as we can if we want to change the world through our businesses.
Often times we only consider the factors that lead to the success of a startup; however, these are the common factors that we may often overlook that lead to the failure of startups:

1. Being inflexible and not actively seeking or using customer feedback
Ignoring your users is a tried and true way to fail. This was the number one reason given for failure amongst 32 startup failure post-mortems being analyzed. Tunnel vision and not gathering user feedback are fatal flaws for most startups. For instance, ecrowds, a web content management system company, said that: We spent way too much time building it for ourselves and not getting feedback from prospects.

2. Building a solution looking for a problem.
Choosing to tackle problems that are interesting to solve rather than those that serve a market need has often been cited as a reason for failure.

3. Not the right team
A diverse team with different skill sets has also been cited as being critical to the success of a startup company. Team deficiencies have been given as a reason for startup failure almost one quarter of the time.

4. Poor Marketing
Knowing your target audience and knowing how to get their attention and convert them to leads and ultimately customers is one of the most important skills of a successful business. Yet, in almost 30 percent of failures, ineffective marketing was a primary cause of failure. Oftentimes, the inability to market was a function of founders who liked to code or build product but who did not relish the idea of promoting the product. The folks at Devver highlighted the need to find someone who enjoys creating and finding distribution channels and developing business relationship for the company as a key need that startups should ensure they fill.

5. Ran out of cash
Money and time are finite and need to be allocated judiciously. The question of how should you spend your money was a frequent conundrum and reason for failure cited by failed startups. The decision on whether to spend significantly upfront to get the product off the group or develop gradually over time is a tough act to balance. The team at YouCastr cited money problems as the reason for failure but went on to highlight other reasons for shutting down versus trying to raise more money writing:
The single biggest reason we are closing down (a common one) is running out of cash. Despite putting the company in an EXTREMELY lean position, generating revenue, and holding out as long as we could, we did not have the cash to keep going. The next few reasons shed more light as to why we chose to shut down

I hope you will derive some benefits from this.

Finally, I have voted and commented on your idea; please consider supporting my idea with your votes and comments @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17094/

Best of luck in your implementation.

Comment on: Sponge City
October 30, 2020 16:59

My dear Campus [email protected], I am very much grateful for your immense support while we are together in this campus. I appreciate your votes and comments on my idea and will never take this for granted. More so, today being the last day for the cvoting and commenting phase in the competition, I am sharing with you as indicated in one of the articles on this campus, some of the things that can likely put an end to our startups. The essence is for us to guide against them as possible as we can if we want to change the world through our businesses.
Often times we only consider the factors that lead to the success of a startup; however, these are the common factors that we may often overlook that lead to the failure of startups:

1. Being inflexible and not actively seeking or using customer feedback
Ignoring your users is a tried and true way to fail. This was the number one reason given for failure amongst 32 startup failure post-mortems being analyzed. Tunnel vision and not gathering user feedback are fatal flaws for most startups. For instance, ecrowds, a web content management system company, said that: We spent way too much time building it for ourselves and not getting feedback from prospects.

2. Building a solution looking for a problem.
Choosing to tackle problems that are interesting to solve rather than those that serve a market need has often been cited as a reason for failure.

3. Not the right team
A diverse team with different skill sets has also been cited as being critical to the success of a startup company. Team deficiencies have been given as a reason for startup failure almost one quarter of the time.

4. Poor Marketing
Knowing your target audience and knowing how to get their attention and convert them to leads and ultimately customers is one of the most important skills of a successful business. Yet, in almost 30 percent of failures, ineffective marketing was a primary cause of failure. Oftentimes, the inability to market was a function of founders who liked to code or build product but who did not relish the idea of promoting the product. The folks at Devver highlighted the need to find someone who enjoys creating and finding distribution channels and developing business relationship for the company as a key need that startups should ensure they fill.

5. Ran out of cash
Money and time are finite and need to be allocated judiciously. The question of how should you spend your money was a frequent conundrum and reason for failure cited by failed startups. The decision on whether to spend significantly upfront to get the product off the group or develop gradually over time is a tough act to balance. The team at YouCastr cited money problems as the reason for failure but went on to highlight other reasons for shutting down versus trying to raise more money writing:
The single biggest reason we are closing down (a common one) is running out of cash. Despite putting the company in an EXTREMELY lean position, generating revenue, and holding out as long as we could, we did not have the cash to keep going. The next few reasons shed more light as to why we chose to shut down

I hope you will derive some benefits from this.

Finally, I have voted and commented on your idea; please consider supporting my idea with your votes and comments @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17094/

Best of luck in your implementation.

October 30, 2020 16:58

My dear Campus [email protected], I am very much grateful for your immense support while we are together in this campus. I appreciate your votes and comments on my idea and will never take this for granted. More so, today being the last day for the cvoting and commenting phase in the competition, I am sharing with you as indicated in one of the articles on this campus, some of the things that can likely put an end to our startups. The essence is for us to guide against them as possible as we can if we want to change the world through our businesses.
Often times we only consider the factors that lead to the success of a startup; however, these are the common factors that we may often overlook that lead to the failure of startups:

1. Being inflexible and not actively seeking or using customer feedback
Ignoring your users is a tried and true way to fail. This was the number one reason given for failure amongst 32 startup failure post-mortems being analyzed. Tunnel vision and not gathering user feedback are fatal flaws for most startups. For instance, ecrowds, a web content management system company, said that: We spent way too much time building it for ourselves and not getting feedback from prospects.

2. Building a solution looking for a problem.
Choosing to tackle problems that are interesting to solve rather than those that serve a market need has often been cited as a reason for failure.

3. Not the right team
A diverse team with different skill sets has also been cited as being critical to the success of a startup company. Team deficiencies have been given as a reason for startup failure almost one quarter of the time.

4. Poor Marketing
Knowing your target audience and knowing how to get their attention and convert them to leads and ultimately customers is one of the most important skills of a successful business. Yet, in almost 30 percent of failures, ineffective marketing was a primary cause of failure. Oftentimes, the inability to market was a function of founders who liked to code or build product but who did not relish the idea of promoting the product. The folks at Devver highlighted the need to find someone who enjoys creating and finding distribution channels and developing business relationship for the company as a key need that startups should ensure they fill.

5. Ran out of cash
Money and time are finite and need to be allocated judiciously. The question of how should you spend your money was a frequent conundrum and reason for failure cited by failed startups. The decision on whether to spend significantly upfront to get the product off the group or develop gradually over time is a tough act to balance. The team at YouCastr cited money problems as the reason for failure but went on to highlight other reasons for shutting down versus trying to raise more money writing:
The single biggest reason we are closing down (a common one) is running out of cash. Despite putting the company in an EXTREMELY lean position, generating revenue, and holding out as long as we could, we did not have the cash to keep going. The next few reasons shed more light as to why we chose to shut down

I hope you will derive some benefits from this.

Finally, I have voted and commented on your idea; please consider supporting my idea with your votes and comments @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17094/

Best of luck in your implementation.

October 30, 2020 16:57

My dear Campus [email protected], I am very much grateful for your immense support while we are together in this campus. I appreciate your votes and comments on my idea and will never take this for granted. More so, today being the last day for the cvoting and commenting phase in the competition, I am sharing with you as indicated in one of the articles on this campus, some of the things that can likely put an end to our startups. The essence is for us to guide against them as possible as we can if we want to change the world through our businesses.
Often times we only consider the factors that lead to the success of a startup; however, these are the common factors that we may often overlook that lead to the failure of startups:

1. Being inflexible and not actively seeking or using customer feedback
Ignoring your users is a tried and true way to fail. This was the number one reason given for failure amongst 32 startup failure post-mortems being analyzed. Tunnel vision and not gathering user feedback are fatal flaws for most startups. For instance, ecrowds, a web content management system company, said that: We spent way too much time building it for ourselves and not getting feedback from prospects.

2. Building a solution looking for a problem.
Choosing to tackle problems that are interesting to solve rather than those that serve a market need has often been cited as a reason for failure.

3. Not the right team
A diverse team with different skill sets has also been cited as being critical to the success of a startup company. Team deficiencies have been given as a reason for startup failure almost one quarter of the time.

4. Poor Marketing
Knowing your target audience and knowing how to get their attention and convert them to leads and ultimately customers is one of the most important skills of a successful business. Yet, in almost 30 percent of failures, ineffective marketing was a primary cause of failure. Oftentimes, the inability to market was a function of founders who liked to code or build product but who did not relish the idea of promoting the product. The folks at Devver highlighted the need to find someone who enjoys creating and finding distribution channels and developing business relationship for the company as a key need that startups should ensure they fill.

5. Ran out of cash
Money and time are finite and need to be allocated judiciously. The question of how should you spend your money was a frequent conundrum and reason for failure cited by failed startups. The decision on whether to spend significantly upfront to get the product off the group or develop gradually over time is a tough act to balance. The team at YouCastr cited money problems as the reason for failure but went on to highlight other reasons for shutting down versus trying to raise more money writing:
The single biggest reason we are closing down (a common one) is running out of cash. Despite putting the company in an EXTREMELY lean position, generating revenue, and holding out as long as we could, we did not have the cash to keep going. The next few reasons shed more light as to why we chose to shut down

I hope you will derive some benefits from this.

Finally, I have voted and commented on your idea; please consider supporting my idea with your votes and comments @https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/17094/

Best of luck in your implementation.