This Entrepreneur Is the First Black Woman to Travel to Every Country

Entrepreneurship and travel have a lot in common, they’re both journeys that might start alone but bring personal and professional growth while empowering others.

Here’s one woman’s story that will make live an inspired life. Jessica Nabongo is a traveler, writer, and entrepreneur who also happens to be the first black woman to have visited every country in the world.

Being a woman entrepreneur that lives a life of travel and entrepreneurship while educating and inspiring others to do the same, sound like the story that anybody would love to hear.
Jessica created a business out of her love of travel, self-discovery, and doing things that bring joy while living on her terms. Her life adventure around the world also highlights how kindness and openness towards other people or different experiences link into a growth mindset.

What people can learn from Jessica’s stories is that pushing boundaries and getting out of the comfort zone can lead to a more fulfilling and satisfying life.
The experience of this inspiring woman teaches how to break free of the status quo and live an extraordinary life, especially for girls and young women, and how to use all the knowledge gained from trawling the world for entrepreneurial ideas.

Check out her website The Catch Me if You Can for great information and tips on responsible travel and new experiences.
Travel is important because, besides the pleasure of exploring new places and having fun, it is educational. At the same time, it can enlighten aspiring entrepreneurs with various business ideas. Hence a great thing to do would be to make travel easier, safer, and accessible for everyone.
However, with many travel restrictions in place and closed borders, you can still focus on making your communities safer and more resilient through innovative and educational ideas. Take the free Online Training  by the Entrepreneurship Campus and gain the necessary knowledge to develop a business idea or project. If you feel challenged you can submit your idea or project to the 2020 Citizen Entrepreneurship Competition.

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268 Comments

  1. Entrepreneurship and travel have a lot in common, they’re both journeys that might start alone but bring personal and professional growth while empowering others.

    Here’s one woman’s story that will make live an inspired life. Jessica Nabongo is a traveler, writer, and entrepreneur who also happens to be the first black woman to have visited every country in the world.

    Being a woman entrepreneur that lives a life of travel and entrepreneurship while educating and inspiring others to do the same, sound like the story that anybody would love to hear.
    Jessica created a business out of her love of travel, self-discovery, and doing things that bring joy while living on her terms. Her life adventure around the world also highlights how kindness and openness towards other people or different experiences link into a growth mindset.

    this article is a reality

  2. Here’s one woman’s story that will make live an inspired life. Jessica Nabongo is a traveler, writer, and entrepreneur who also happens to be the first black woman to have visited every country in the world.

    her story is likened or a sort of Mary Slessor who came to my place Calabar to stop the Killing of Twins

  3. Here’s one woman’s story that will make live an inspired life. Jessica Nabongo is a traveler, writer, and entrepreneur who also happens to be the first black woman to have visited every country in the world.

    travelling with the canoe is areal life experience of her

  4. Even her with the yatch so amazing

  5. What people can learn from Jessica’s stories is that pushing boundaries and getting out of the comfort zone can lead to a more fulfilling and satisfying life.
    The experience of this inspiring woman teaches how to break free of the status quo and live an extraordinary life, especially for girls and young women, and how to use all the knowledge gained from trawling the world for entrepreneurial ideas.

  6. Watching her with plane 5h SUN coastal, is so amzing to me

  7. Life is the consequence of the decisions we make. Choose wisely!”

    Writer, entrepreneur, travel influencer and nomad, Jessica Nabongo, has traveled to more than 100 countries and territories across six continents. Born and raised in Detroit, Michigan to Ugandan immigrants, Jessica remembers daydreams of foreign lands and a life of wander after her first international trip to London and Uganda at the age of six. Today, Jessica travels the world and is passionate about sharing her experiences in countries that have typically low rates of tourism.

  8. i want to be like her soon, i have made up my mine

  9. Being a woman entrepreneur that lives a life of travel and entrepreneurship while educating and inspiring others to do the same, sound like the story that anybody would love to hear.
    Jessica created a business out of her love of travel, self-discovery, and doing things that bring joy while living on her terms. Her life adventure around the world also highlights how kindness and openness towards other people or different experiences link into a growth mindset.

  10. Travel is important because, besides the pleasure of exploring new places and having fun, it is educational. At the same time, it can enlighten aspiring entrepreneurs with various business ideas. Hence a great thing to do would be to make travel easier, safer, and accessible for everyone.

  11. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    Jessica Nabongo (born 1984) is a Ugandan-American travel blogger and brand influencer.

  12. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    She is the first black woman to have travelled to every country in the world. On October 6, 2019 she had arrived in her final country, the Seychelles.

  13. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    She was born in Detroit, Michigan to Ugandan parents. She attended St. John’s University in New York City where she obtained a Bachelor of Arts in English and then the London School of Economics where she acquired a master’s degree in international development.

  14. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    Although she started travelling at the age of six, after completing college, she worked at a pharmaceutical company for two years, taught English in Japan and worked as a consultant for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation before finally becoming a travel blogger.

  15. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    She is known to have founded a company called Jet Black, which organises custom itineraries for small group trips in Africa, plus sells travel gear like branded T-shirts and passport covers.

  16. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    She is also a brand influencer, working with hotels and hospitality brands

  17. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    As of 2016, she had already visited 60 countries. So in 2017, she decided to visit all 193 countries in the world.

  18. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    According to a post on her instagram page, she arrived at the 195th country on her list on October 6, which was Seychelles

  19. Entrepreneurship and travel have a lot in common, they’re both journeys that might start alone but bring personal and professional growth while empowering others. Traveling is very essential in the entrepreneurship precept; it brings new ideas to entrepreneurs. It is ‘research making’

  20. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    Jessica Nabongo is a wanderlust, writer, entrepreneur, public speaker and travel influencer. At her core, she is a dreamer looking to craft a life and career that interconnects her passions and talents.

  21. Jessica Nabongo also wants to use her story to educate and inspire others to travel and experience the world around them.

  22. A first generation American, Jessica was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan to Ugandan parents.

  23. She attended St. John’s University in New York, where she earned her undergraduate degree in English literature.

  24. In just a few years after college, she started (and ended) a career in pharmaceutical sales, moved to Japan to teach English, and completed a graduate degree at the London School of Economics.

  25. She captured her experiences along the way, honing her photography skills.

  26. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    As her career path changed, Jessica realized that travel, writing and photography continued to show up as vehicles of self expression and were essential parts of her life, leading to the creation of this site, The Catch Me If You Can.

  27. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    She uses her blog to share her story and build a community.

  28. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    She also created Jet Black, a boutique luxury travel company that hosts group trips and curates itineraries to countries in Africa, Central and South America, the Caribbean.

  29. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    Jessica Nabongo (born 1984) is a Ugandan-American travel blogger and brand influencer. She is the first black woman to have travelled to every country in the world.
    We catch up with Jessica Nabongo, founder of Jet Black and the first black woman to visit every country in the world.
    Learn from her members!

  30. Anonymous

    09.09.2020 · Reply

    Her work as a travel writer and entrepreneur has led to speaking opportunities around the world.

  31. “What people can learn from Jessica’s stories is that pushing boundaries and getting out of the comfort zone can lead to a more fulfilling and satisfying life.
    The experience of this inspiring woman teaches how to break free of the status quo and live an extraordinary life, especially for girls and young women, and how to use all the knowledge gained from trawling the world for entrepreneurial ideas”.

    This is really an educating article and an eye opener learning from Jessica’s story.

    Thank you Campus Administrator for sharing this article

  32. Although it might seem counterintuitive, travel is a key educational tool for both new and seasoned entrepreneurs and has prompted the formation of many successful companies. Outside of being a lot of fun, travel can be an essential part of an entrepreneur’s development. Travel helps develop important business characteristics, allows access to psychological benefits, and enhances the entrepreneur’s problem-solving abilities. you know aside me being an entrepreneur, I also work around democracy open governance with partnership with the Youths Initiative For Advocacy Growth and advancement ( YIAGA AFRICA) and other organisation’s. This has given me lots of opportunity to travel abroad. If you go off travelling, especially if you’re fairly young, you’ll meet far more people than you normally would at home. I love travelling. When I went to Madrid 7 months ago, I was only there for 3 weeks and visited different places, is a beautiful place no doubt but there is too much hype about it that is not really worth it. It is beautiful and alot of places to go for sight seeing, it is the most touristic city in Spain, the places i really did enjoy visiting in madrid was parque de attractiones and the Chinese restaurants ( u will fall in love) but from my view it is not as beautiful as Barcelona or Valencia. The beaches there are worth any dime you get to spend, its relaxing and if you appreciate the work of art its the best place to be. I met a lot of amazing people. What’s beautiful is, most of them are doing the same thing you are. Travelling.

    Regardless of whether you’re an entrepreneur or not, there’s no denying that the world is beautiful. Most of it we’ve only ever seen in pictures or videos, but obviously it’s not quite the same thing. Everywhere is different, and that’s the beauty of travelling.You get to see so many different landmarks, views and such, but you also get to be present within different cultures, different nationalities, lifestyles and it really gives you a better understanding of the world, and a bigger sense of accomplishment at the same time.
    You get to see so many different landmarks, views and such, but you also get to be present within different cultures, different nationalities, lifestyles and it really gives you a better understanding of the world, and a bigger sense of accomplishment at the same time.
    But unfortunately since the inception of COVID-19 I have not travel, two trips have been cancelled. As an entrepreneur training makes you gain a Better Understanding of the World it’s Improve Your Business’ Potential. I encourage you to visit one new country every year, and take in its unique beauty. I will love to tour the world if I have my way! Finally, I’m inviting you to our page to view on our IDEA / PROJECT “BUILDINGS THE INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AFRICAN CULTURE”
    and please consider supporting us with your Comments and votes thank you.

    https://www.entrepreneurship-campus.org/ideas/26/18576/#vote-container

  33. Importance of tourism arises from the numerous benefits and advantages it brings to any host country. But real importance of tourism comes from its nature and how it is defined & structured.

  34. And this is what we will explain here. Tourism contributes towards complete growth and development of a country: one, by bringing numerous economic value & benefits; and, second, helping in build country’s brand value, image & identity. Tourism industry goes beyond attractive destinations, to being an important economic growth contributor.

  35. We will talk about and explain how tourism adds economic (and non-economic) value to a country and why does it have so much importance for every country. Why every country looks at tourism not just as attracting tourists but as a platform which supports economic growth and complete development. Why it is now gaining recognition and importance as an indicator towards and a barometer of not just growth & development but also social-economic factors.

  36. Here we do not just list out points of tourism importance. We want to actually know why tourism is important, for countries, for economies and for the world. We want to understand the reasons and factors which actually make tourism important. For this we need to understand tourism definition & meaning, and its structure. It is the nature, meaning & composition that makes tourism important and brings all its benefits and advantages.

  37. This Entrepreneur Is the First Black Woman to Travel to Every Country

    Jessica Nabongo is a wanderlust, writer, entrepreneur, public speaker and travel influencer. At her core, she is a dreamer looking to craft a life and career that interconnects her passions and talents. She also wants to use her story to educate and inspire others to travel and experience the world around them.

  38. A first generation American, Jessica was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan to Ugandan parents. She attended St. John’s University in New York, where she earned her undergraduate degree in English literature. In just a few years after college, she started (and ended) a career in pharmaceutical sales, moved to Japan to teach English, and completed a graduate degree at the London School of Economics. She captured her experiences along the way, honing her photography skills.

  39. I wish to be like her and do more .

    Tourism arises from the numerous advantages and benefits, it brings togetherness in any host country. But real importance of tourism comes from its nature and how it is structured and defined.

  40. What people can learn from Jessica’s stories is that pushing boundaries and getting out of the comfort zone can lead to a more fulfilling and satisfying life.
    The experience of this inspiring woman teaches how to break free of the status quo and live an extraordinary life, especially for girls and young women, and how to use all the knowledge gained from trawling the world for entrepreneurial ideas”.

    This is really an educating article and an eye opener learning from Jessica’s story.

    Thank you Campus Administrator for sharing this article
    eduheal is right, i agree with her

  41. Although it might seem counterintuitive, travel is a key educational tool for both new and seasoned entrepreneurs and has prompted the formation of many successful companies. Outside of being a lot of fun, travel can be an essential part of an entrepreneur’s development. Travel helps develop important business characteristics, allows access to psychological benefits, and enhances the entrepreneur’s problem-solving abilities. you know aside me being an entrepreneur, I also work around democracy open governance with partnership with the Youths Initiative For Advocacy Growth and advancement ( YIAGA AFRICA) and other organisation’s. This has given me lots of opportunity to travel abroad. If you go off travelling, especially if you’re fairly young, you’ll meet far more people than you normally would at home. I love travelling. When I went to Madrid 7 months ago, I was only there for 3 weeks and visited different places, is a beautiful place no doubt but there is too much hype about it that is not really worth it. It is beautiful and alot of places to go for sight seeing, it is the most touristic city in Spain, the places i really did enjoy visiting in madrid was parque de attractiones and the Chinese restaurants ( u will fall in love) but from my view it is not as beautiful as Barcelona or Valencia. The beaches there are worth any dime you get to spend, its relaxing and if you appreciate the work of art its the best place to be. I met a lot of amazing people.

    I intuitively agree with Umar imam

  42. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    In 2017, travel influencer Jessica Nabongo went full nomad, visiting 135 countries in two and a half years.

  43. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    Along with the 60 she had already ticked off, Jessica has now traveled to every country in the world – and that makes her the first woman of color to do so.

  44. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    Culture Trip learns Jessica’s key takeaways, and her advice for traveling the globe.

  45. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    Jessica Nabongo, a former UN employee from Detroit, is about as influential as travel influencers get.

  46. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    Of the almost 8bn people on the planet, she is one of only 300 to have traveled to all 195 countries in the world – and the first black woman to do so.

  47. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    Her motivation goes way beyond snapping shots in front of cultural landmarks and lounging on palm tree-lined beaches, though that’s not to say she hasn’t done that too.

  48. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    Her Instagram feed proves she has mastered the art. “Number one it was for the representation of black people,” Nabongo says. “Number two, it was for women, as less than 25 women have done it globally; number three, for Africans.”

  49. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    Which of the following is usually the most important motivation for a woman entrepreneur *?
    The main influences of motivation for women entrepreneurship are financial compulsions, usage of skills, technology, and knowledge, want of achievement-satisfaction of others and obstructions in the current profession and suitable training, etc.
    What makes a woman successful in business?
    Being a successful woman in business means having the courage to own who you are, why you are doing what you do and how you can apply your vision to positively impact the world. A successful woman is confidently feminine and eager to learn and grow. She has achieved balance and perspective in all aspects of her life.
    Who are the richest female entrepreneurs?
    The Nation’s Richest Self-Made Women are:
    Judy Faulkner. $3.5 Billion.
    Meg Whitman. $3.3 Billion. …
    Johnelle Hunt. $3.2 Billion. …
    Oprah Winfrey. $3.1 Billion. …
    Judy Love. $3 Billion. …
    Doris Fisher. $2.8 Billion. …
    Elaine Wynn. $2.6 Billion. …
    Lynda Resnick. $2.4 Billion. …
    How do you keep going an entrepreneur?
    Here is how:
    1
    Be Kind to Yourself. Accept that you are suffering. …
    2
    Get some perspective on life. Walk in nature. …
    3
    Reconnect with your vision. You started this for a reason. …
    4
    Change your beliefs about obstacles. …
    5
    Change your beliefs about failure. …
    6
    Fall in Love with the Process again. …
    7
    Listen to your Heart.

  50. Since completing her trip last year, she’s had messages from inspired women, and even men.

  51. But the purpose of her journey went further than encouraging intrepidity.

  52. The goal of my very public journey was not to say ‘hey, you should go to every country in the world’,” she says. “In fact, I don’t think everyone should. It was about showing people if you can dream it, then you can do it.”

  53. What skills can an entrepreneur often employ rather than develop in themselves?
    The 10 Skills Every Entrepreneur Needs to Develop
    Complex Problem Solving. Complexity is defined as the number of variables or inputs into a system. …
    Critical Thinking. Critical thinking goes hand in hand with complex problem solving. …
    Creativity. …
    What do the most successful entrepreneurs have in common?
    While the top entrepreneurs are confident and self-reliant, the most successful are also humble. A business owner must be able to admit when they need help, give credit to those who help them succeed, and own up to their mistakes.
    What is a main reason why entrepreneurs experience daily stress?
    Answer Expert Verified. Yes that is the answer “They have considerable responsibility”, which is a main reason why entrepreneurs experience daily stress.
    What strategies do entrepreneurs use?
    6 Timeless Strategies That Drive Successful Entrepreneurship
    Study the competition. As an entrepreneur, you need to know who your competitors are. …
    Conserve cash no matter how good business is. Frankly put, live as cheaply as possible. …
    Research new products and services. …
    Don’t tackle huge markets at first. …
    Listen to customer feedback and adapt. …
    Respond to change.
    People Management. …
    Coordinating With Others. …
    Emotional Intelligence. …
    Judgement and Decision Making. …
    Service Orientation.

  54. Switching between her American and Ugandan passports, it was a trip of ups and downs. The highs included visiting Lake Assal in Djibouti, which is the lowest point in Africa and a place Jessica had never seen in pictures. Other highlights were sunset over the Salar de Uyuni salt flats in Bolivia, the Sheikh Zayed mosque in Abu Dhabi, an “amazing modern marvel”, and the pyramids in Sudan, which are older than those in Egypt. The tourist trap of Machu Picchu in Peru fell into the let-down camp. “I had seen so many images of it,” Nabongo says, “that when I got there I thought, ‘Yep, it looks exactly like the millions of images I’ve seen.’ That’s why I avoid doing too much research.”

  55. For every entrepreneur, getting out of comfort zone and pushing boundaries is very necessary. Those that dare not move from where they are will always remain in one position but those who seek for every opportunity to push ahead make a difference in life. This article indeed is an encouragement to everyone of the campus members.

    Thank you campus admin for sharing

  56. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    In addition to juliuschiemezue’s comment,
    Switching between her American and Ugandan passports, it was a trip of ups and downs.

  57. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    The highs included visiting Lake Assal in Djibouti, which is the lowest point in Africa and a place Jessica had never seen in pictures.

  58. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    Other highlights were sunset over the Salar de Uyuni salt flats in Bolivia, the Sheikh Zayed mosque in Abu Dhabi, an “amazing modern marvel”, and the pyramids in Sudan, which are older than those in Egypt.

  59. Anonymous

    10.09.2020 · Reply

    The tourist trap of Machu Picchu in Peru fell into the let-down camp. “I had seen so many images of it,” Nabongo says, “that when I got there I thought, ‘Yep, it looks exactly like the millions of images I’ve seen.’ That’s why I avoid doing too much research.”

  60. “What a man can do a woman can do better”, but would a woman dare do these 15 things?
    Men are created differently with certain things that are exclusively preserved for them, just as there are certain things that women naturally have exclusive monopoly over.
    However, there is an adage that “what a man can do a woman can do better”, which feminists always propagate when they try to highlight the value of womanhood.
    Well, some people also hold the view that the above adage is sweeping and does not reflect the reality.
    As a matter of fact, there are certain things both women and men are capable of doing, but some other things are naturally exclusive to either gender.
    For example, unless there is any artificial way by which women in future can get themselves pregnant, they still need a man to impregnate them.

    Also, irrespective of what sex positions adopted in bed, a woman will eventually be the one to conceive, and the man will not.

    Interestingly, tuko.co.ke conducted a survey among its male followers on social media, and they have listed 15 hilarious things they believe women will not even make the attempt to do, let alone succeed at them.

    Below is the list:

    1. A woman cannot get herself pregnant.

    2. A man can go to work with his wedding suit but a woman cannot walk around in her wedding dress.

    3. Lol! A woman cannot wear the same pair of underwear for days on end.

    4. A lady cannot go for a short call while standing.

    5. A woman cannot be married to two men at the same time.

    6. A man cannot forgive a cheating spouse while a woman can.

    7. A woman cannot hide a pregnancy she got from an extramarital affair.

     8. Lol! A woman cannot foot her man’s bills.

     9. Haha, apparently it is close to impossible for a woman to park a car.

    10. A woman cannot walk into a supermarket, pick one item, pay and leave.

    11. A woman cannot go to bed and fall asleep within 10 seconds.

    12. Unlike a man, a woman cannot walk around the house shirtless.

    13. Wait for it. Apparently a lady cannot split bills and not whine about it.

    14. No woman worth her salt can go for a leak in the middle of the road.

    15. Ladies cannot take French bathe for a whole week like men.

    Do you agree?

    The point is, God created a man for a purpose and has a different purpose for creating a woman. There may be certain things common to both sexes, but the difference will continue to be there. That is not to say one is superior and the other inferior.

  61. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    In October 2019, travel entrepreneur and photographer Jessica Nabongo became the first documented black woman to visit all 195 UN member states, travelling to 89 countries solo.

  62. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    She talked to us about extreme destinations and new adventures.

  63. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    What inspires your adventures?
    Curiosity — that’s what’s always inspired me.

  64. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    I have a strong desire to see the differences and similarities in how people live everywhere in the world.

  65. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    Even at home in the United States. I put a lot of trust in strangers, and I believe you can travel solo anywhere.

  66. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    Who was the most interesting person you met?
    My guide in Algeria, Zaki. It was towards the end of my journey, and at the time there were a lot of anti-government protests going on there.

  67. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    We were supposed to be touring, but we ended up sitting in a café, talking. I’ll never forget what he said: “I’m just living for the sake of living.

  68. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    You can’t have wild ambition around here, especially if you’re the oldest child.” It really struck me. Simply because of where he’d been born, his opportunities were limited to the point where he didn’t even want to think about success.

  69. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    Do you have any travel heroes?
    Barbara Hillary. She was the first black woman to visit the North and the South Pole, and she did it aged 75 and 79 — isn’t that wild? The other is Cory Lee.

  70. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    He’s in a wheelchair, and has visited 37 countries. I can’t relate to him because I haven’t faced those challenges, but I love that he hasn’t let being in a wheelchair stop him from exploring the world.

  71. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    I also follow Traveling Black Widow on Instagram. She was married for 31 years, but after her partner died, she went on to explore the world. I love her.

  72. When we talk about diversity, people mostly think about racial diversity, but it’s also about abilities, age and body type.

  73. There are so many different types of diversity, and everybody should be seen. I like to see how people are living their lives without boundaries.

  74. Before your career as a traveller, you studied international development and worked with the United Nations.

  75. Did this help to prepare you?
    Learning about political and economic history at the London School of Economics absolutely opened my mind and taught me about the world, and the UN was certainly an interesting experience.

  76. My studies gave me an understanding of post-colonial dynamics and how different countries wield their power.

  77. A simple example of how this can apply to travel is the relationship between former colonies and air routes.

  78. The easiest way to get to former French colonies, particularly in Africa, would be by flying through Paris — the French airlines there will have a monopoly because of the diaspora.

  79. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    What was the most extreme place you visited?
    Let’s talk about South Sudan. The US embassy strongly discourages US citizens from travelling there, and I was advised by a diplomat that it was too dangerous.

  80. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    South Sudan is insecure in terms of its government, and, of course, terrible things have happened. But I always say no country in the world is completely safe, and no country in the world is completely unsafe. You find what you’re seeking. What I’m seeking is humanity. I’m seeking love. So I went anyway.

  81. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    I spent my time there with a South Sudanese woman, Nyankuir. I didn’t want to go to a compound and never leave it. Instead, I visited a cattle camp — cattle are an extremely important aspect of Dinka culture. I spent time speaking to the elders and the children, and I found out my bride price — 30 cattle, at most, because at five-foot seven, I’m considered short there.

  82. Anonymous

    11.09.2020 · Reply

    Business: 17 Women Entrepreneurs Share Their StoriesThinking about starting your own business? Here are some great ‘origin stories’ that will definitely inspire you.
    One thing we can all agree on is that female entrepreneurs don’t get enough press — even the successful ones.
    So let’s take a step toward changing that.
    Here’s a guest post from Mary Fernandez, a visibility strategist who helps entrepreneurs stand out online. (She’s also created a handy guide that will help you discover how to skyrocket your online presence.)
    Here’s Mary:
    Every successful entrepreneur started somewhere.
    There’s no “magic pill” that effortlessly launches you out of your cubicle confinement and into the free world of entrepreneurship. For some, the dream to be your own boss grows for a long time, even years, before it finally comes to fruition.
    The truth is, great success in business grows from just one, tiny seed.
    We asked some of our favorite women entrepreneurs to share how they got their start in business. Their answers revealed the deep motivators and personal qualities that drove them to make their big idea a reality.
    By reading about how they grew their businesses over the years, our goal is that you’ll identify a similar entrepreneurial seed, within yourself.
    Here’s what these women had to share about getting their start as entrepreneurs.
    1. Sue Bryce
    “My path to self employment seemed to me, a natural evolution.
    “But, it wasn’t based on a great desire to build a business. Rather, it was borne out of necessity. After 13 years mastering my craft, I was still an employee and I simply had reached a ceiling of how much money I could earn in my career.
    “After the initial fear and hurdles, the learning curve is so great I came very close to failure. Instead of giving up, I started to develop a deep sense of passion for motivating and educating myself to reach greater heights in business and income. It became a challenge for me, and I don’t know any other way now. After 13 years of self-employment, I still challenge myself to create on a larger and larger scale every year.
    “My desire to build, create, and learn, surpasses my fear. Every challenge I’m faced with now, becomes a greater experience of learning my true power.”
    Now, Sue’s teamed up with Tiffany Angeles to break down their biggest business lessons, and teach a class on how to Make More Money and Discover Your Worth.
    2. Sophia Amoruso
    “Don’t give up, don’t take anything personally, and don’t take no for an answer,” Sophia advises.
    Since founding Nasty Gal as an eBay store in 2006, selling vintage clothing, Sophia has transformed the business into a multimillion-dollar empire with its own clothing line that was named the “Fastest Growing Retailer” in 2012. Recently, The New York Times Bestseller of #GIRLBOSS has stepped out of her role as the CEO of Nasty Gal to become the executive chairman and shift her focus to overseeing just the creative and brand marketing functions of the business.
    Without any fashion or business experience before starting Nasty Gal, Sophia credits much of her hard-earned success to her inability to accept failure as an option. “The people who told me no, were the people who eventually told me yes,” she adds.
    3. Pamela Slim
    “In addition to working full-time as an employee for 10 years, I had also been the volunteer executive director for a non-profit martial arts school in San Francisco.
    “My typical day was about 15 hours straight. Work, jump on the metro over to the studio, train capoeira for 3-4 hours, then do administrative work before bed. Weekends were filled with classes, performances, and putting up fliers around the city to attract new students to the school.
    “The tipping point came right before my 30th birthday. I got pneumonia from the non-stop grueling pace, and realized I needed to make a career move. So, contrary to how I advise my clients, I leapt with no plan, just the desire to get off the merry-go-round and find a more sustainable path.
    “After a few months of recovery and half-hearted job search, I contacted my old manager who had moved to Hewlett-Packard and asked her if she needed a little help. I started working as a consultant, and I felt like a huge fire was lit inside of me. I loved being a consultant. My problem had never been about the work, it was more about the right work mode.
    “I realized that the 10 years I had volunteered as an executive director had prepared me for entrepreneurial life. I knew how to create and fund big programs. I knew how to build a network and mobilize people to a cause. I knew how to sell and market. So, now that I had my own shingle out, I took off and built a thriving and fulfilling practice.
    “This year, I celebrate 20 years in business for myself. It hasn’t always been easy, but it continues to bring me great joy and satisfaction.”
    4. Tara Gentile
    “I decided to become a business owner after I was looked over for a promotion while nine months pregnant.
    “Six months after my daughter was born, I started a little niche website and community. I then purchased an existing blog business, and almost overnight, started making more money than I had in my previous job.
    “My business has evolved significantly since then, but I’m so grateful for the way I started!”
    Tara, one of our most successful business instructors here at CreativeLive, has successfully gone from selling her services, to packaging them into digital products for her clients. It’s helped her significantly scale her business, and now she teaches a class about how to turn your services into a product.
    5. Melissa Galt
    “The year following my graduation from Cornell, my mom died suddenly of a brain aneurysm. It took me the ensuing five years to understand the lesson in her passing. Life is too short to do something you don’t love. She had been a maverick in her field, an Oscar winning actress who knew at age 7 what she wanted. It took me a bit longer.
    “I decided to pursue my dream of interior design, and went back to school full-time, while picking up full-time work in the field. However, I was still frustrated that I was not in charge of my day and my decisions.
    “Ultimately, my headstrong nature was both my undoing and my new beginning…
    “I’d planned to launch my startup in September 1994. When I asked my manager for time off, she said I didn’t have it. I said I did, and dug my heels in. Arguing with your manager when you need your job is never wise. I walked out.
    “I was unemployed, in debt, and six months premature to my planned launch. I launched immediately while taking up side jobs supervising a catering kitchen and teaching busy professionals (aka potential clients for my interior design practice) during evening education programs.
    “It was that magical place you hear about where fear meets breath and becomes unstoppable exhilaration. I worked 15 hour days, 6 days a week, because I wanted to. I couldn’t wait to get up, and hated to go to bed at night. I was totally on fire. I went from $70K in debt to rocking six figures and debt free in 18 months and that doubled every year for five years. Today, I design both home and business environments, while also advising the business and lifestyles that go on inside of them.
    “My advice is to find what lights you up, and do whatever it takes to make it happen. You will meet with unexpected success.”
    6. Beate Chelette
    “Remember those huge posters of beautiful places that decorated kid’s rooms in the ’80s? When I was young, I wanted them but couldn’t afford them. Then I realized, if I ordered them for my friends and became a distributor, I could get mine for free. So at the age of 12, I started a poster distribution business out of my bedroom.
    “Later in life, I worked at Elle Magazine as a photo editor. I had a lot of freedom to express my ideas (after all, ideas are what a magazine thrives on). But still… something was always missing. Upon further examination, I arrived at three facts:
    I wanted to be the boss.
    I had a lot of ideas, and my bosses didn’t necessarily agree.
    I wanted to change the world.
    “And here I am today! I’ve been an entrepreneur pretty much my entire professional career. You have to overcome the fear, and it’s a lot of work, but the rewards are fantastic.”
    7. Sue Zimmerman
    “My first entrepreneurial venture was selling my hand-painted barrettes at recess in grade school, even though I was not supposed to be.
    “My dad owned an automobile part store and often brought home model paint that I would use to paint fun, colorful, preppy themes on hair clips.
    “The passion I had for art and painting turned into a nice side hustle, and eventually gave me the confidence and validation to do what I loved at a very young age.”
    8. Tiffany Angeles
    “I felt dead inside working at my corporate job but was too scared to leave.
    “I was looking for a business I could start on nights and weekends. After checking into different businesses, I actually won a camera, so that sealed the deal for a photography business. I built that business by moonlighting for a few years until the income surpassed my corporate job and then went full-time.
    “That business gave me the freedom and flexibility to pursue my dream of speaking and teaching people how to be successful with money. Even though it was painful to leave my corporate security, I am forever grateful that I did, because it led to a life and business I love!”
    Now, Tiffany has joined forces with Sue Bryce to teach an incredible class on how to Make More Money and Discover Your Worth.
    9. Yasmine Khater
    “After a successful corporate career in a Fortune 500 company, losing my dad to cancer led me to redefine life and the impact I want to create. I knew that I didn’t want my boss’s job, any of the other senior management roles, or to work more 12- to 14-hour days. I also knew I didn’t want to sacrifice my quality of life, and regret not living.
    “That’s when I decided to start my business. I brainstormed which skills I could build upon, and what people needed. At the time, my friends were searching for more career direction, so I offered 30-minute career clarity sessions. I booked 4 sessions and got my first three clients.
    “I realized shortly thereafter, that I didn’t really want to help people with their careers. Instead, I wanted to leverage my corporate experience to help small business owners build their sales processes, and develop winning sales systems that could stand the test of time.”
    10. Mayi Carles
    “I was 7. I had just discovered the lemonade stand.
    “Wait a second! Kids can just sell lemonade on the front porch and people give them money? WOW!!! I was blown away.
    “Soon enough, I had set up my own front lawn kiosk, except that instead of selling lemonade, I crafted little masterpieces made with a little paint spinner toy thingy. The line of kids reached the end of the block. Not to brag, but I was a ROCK STAR.
    “Right then and there, I knew I was born to do this.
    “As it turns out, the reason why my art pieces were selling like hot tamales for 50 cents a pop was because they came with a bag of Hershey’s kisses. Mayita, my mom smiled as she made the infamous confession, the chocolates were a dollar at the store. Dang!
    “Alright, maybe my first business idea wasn’t profitable, but I learned the art of putting myself out there with a sense of self-worth at a very young age. That pillar has been instrumental in building my current creative empire.”
    11. Mei Pak
    “I got my first taste of entrepreneurship when I was 10 years old.
    “One day in school, we were allowed to set up a small table to sell whatever we wanted during recess. I brought a zip lock bag of hundreds of tiny semi precious stone chips that I had gotten from my mom’s favorite jewelry store for less than $10. I knew the other kids would love them and sold five little stones for $2.00.
    “In retrospect, I’m not surprised the concept of buy low, sell high came so naturally to me. This kind of stuff is what I was meant to do.”
    12. Courtney Johnston
    “I was never an entrepreneurial kid, but I was always a dreamer and a rule breaker.
    “After graduating college with a French degree in 2009 during the middle of the recession, I quickly realized that I was ‘unemployable’ and decided to start finding ways to make money for myself. A few business ideas later, I started my copywriting business, and have never looked back.”
    13. Kimra Luna
    “I got my first taste of entrepreneurship when I started my own booking agency when I was 18 years. I started booking concerts for fun, and it turned into a full-time gig.”
    14. Jenn Scalia
    “Entrepreneurship was something I was always destined for. But until a few years ago, I had always adhered to the status quo of having a ‘real’ job.
    “After two layoffs in two years, I got a gentle nudge from the Universe that I needed to create my own destiny and my own financial security. While staying home as a full-time mom, I started looking for opportunities where I could use my skills to make money. That’s when I discovered that I could be an online coach, and decided to dive in head first.”
    15. Barbara Findlay Schenck
    “Like many others, my dive into entrepreneurship was prompted by opportunity and necessity.
    “My husband and I had just returned from a stint in the Peace Corps, and–although former employers in Honolulu invited us back to the positions we’d left two years earlier–we wanted to settle down in Oregon. So, we took a raincheck on the generous job offers, and began searching for positions in Bend, Oregon, that matched our journalism, public relations, and marketing backgrounds.
    “With few such openings and no advertising or marketing agency to reach out to, entrepreneurial instinct took over and we seized the moment. We laid out plans for starting our own agency, registered a business name, drew up a list of potential clients, furnished an office (barely), put a sign on the door, and started a six-month sprint to profitability.
    “Why six months? That’s exactly how long we figured our cash reserves would last. When I tell business planners to know their funding runway, I speak from experience.
    “With the clock ticking, we beat the six-month deadline, grew the agency to one of the top 15 in the Northwest, accumulated more clients, friends, and stories than we could count, and 15 years later sold it to new owners who made it the platform for launching their own entrepreneurial journey.”
    16. Phoebe Mroczek
    “To be honest, I’ve been an entrepreneur for as long as I can remember. From the stationery stand in my driveway and my fifth-grade scrunchie business, to the dual-level marketing company I joined in college, it’s really not just a passion. It’s a way of life.
    “While I dipped my toe into the corporate world in Asia, behind the scenes I’d started an events company and shortly afterwards, a travel blog to document a 15-country motorcycle trip.
    “As I built my online network, I bumped into some internet marketing resources that changed the course of my path up until that point. The most influential person I discovered was James Wedmore, whose mentorship gave me the confidence and clarity to develop my business. This was the kick in the pants I needed to define and flex my entrepreneurial muscles.
    “Within 12 months, I’d made six figures and more importantly, built a business that helped female entrepreneurs all around the world. So, I guess you could say I got my start as an entrepreneur a couple years ago once I made the decision to go for it. With a little coaching and a LOT of fear, I went for it and the rest is history!”
    17. Amy Schmittauer
    “How did I get my start as an entrepreneur? Hard freakin’ work.
    “When I realized at my 9-5 that I wanted to work for myself, it was a year and a half before I actually left to make it happen. During that time, I was getting any and all experience I could in my field, on the side of my full-time job. I spent vacation time and extra money on conferences, networking, and working for anyone who would let me help. First for free and then for cheap, until I had confidence in my portfolio and made the leap to focus on my business alone.
    “Everyone wants the decision to be easy or great timing, but it never will be. Do the work. Prove you’re going to keep doing the work when you’re the only one in your corner. And then make it happen.”
    If you’re ready to start (or grow) your own business, you need to learn how to value yourself. Check out Make More Money and Discover Your Worth, over on CreativeLive.

  83. Business: 17 Women Entrepreneurs Share Their StoriesThinking about starting your own business? Here are some great ‘origin stories’ that will definitely inspire you.
    One thing we can all agree on is that female entrepreneurs don’t get enough press — even the successful ones.
    So let’s take a step toward changing that.
    Here’s a guest post from Mary Fernandez, a visibility strategist who helps entrepreneurs stand out online. (She’s also created a handy guide that will help you discover how to skyrocket your online presence.)
    Here’s Mary:
    Every successful entrepreneur started somewhere.
    There’s no “magic pill” that effortlessly launches you out of your cubicle confinement and into the free world of entrepreneurship. For some, the dream to be your own boss grows for a long time, even years, before it finally comes to fruition.
    The truth is, great success in business grows from just one, tiny seed.
    We asked some of our favorite women entrepreneurs to share how they got their start in business. Their answers revealed the deep motivators and personal qualities that drove them to make their big idea a reality.
    By reading about how they grew their businesses over the years, our goal is that you’ll identify a similar entrepreneurial seed, within yourself.
    Here’s what these women had to share about getting their start as entrepreneurs.
    1. Sue Bryce
    “My path to self employment seemed to me, a natural evolution.
    “But, it wasn’t based on a great desire to build a business. Rather, it was borne out of necessity. After 13 years mastering my craft, I was still an employee and I simply had reached a ceiling of how much money I could earn in my career.
    “After the initial fear and hurdles, the learning curve is so great I came very close to failure. Instead of giving up, I started to develop a deep sense of passion for motivating and educating myself to reach greater heights in business and income. It became a challenge for me, and I don’t know any other way now. After 13 years of self-employment, I still challenge myself to create on a larger and larger scale every year.
    “My desire to build, create, and learn, surpasses my fear. Every challenge I’m faced with now, becomes a greater experience of learning my true power.”
    Now, Sue’s teamed up with Tiffany Angeles to break down their biggest business lessons, and teach a class on how to Make More Money and Discover Your Worth.
    2. Sophia Amoruso
    “Don’t give up, don’t take anything personally, and don’t take no for an answer,” Sophia advises.
    Since founding Nasty Gal as an eBay store in 2006, selling vintage clothing, Sophia has transformed the business into a multimillion-dollar empire with its own clothing line that was named the “Fastest Growing Retailer” in 2012. Recently, The New York Times Bestseller of #GIRLBOSS has stepped out of her role as the CEO of Nasty Gal to become the executive chairman and shift her focus to overseeing just the creative and brand marketing functions of the business.
    Without any fashion or business experience before starting Nasty Gal, Sophia credits much of her hard-earned success to her inability to accept failure as an option. “The people who told me no, were the people who eventually told me yes,” she adds.
    3. Pamela Slim
    “In addition to working full-time as an employee for 10 years, I had also been the volunteer executive director for a non-profit martial arts school in San Francisco.
    “My typical day was about 15 hours straight. Work, jump on the metro over to the studio, train capoeira for 3-4 hours, then do administrative work before bed. Weekends were filled with classes, performances, and putting up fliers around the city to attract new students to the school.
    “The tipping point came right before my 30th birthday. I got pneumonia from the non-stop grueling pace, and realized I needed to make a career move. So, contrary to how I advise my clients, I leapt with no plan, just the desire to get off the merry-go-round and find a more sustainable path.
    “After a few months of recovery and half-hearted job search, I contacted my old manager who had moved to Hewlett-Packard and asked her if she needed a little help. I started working as a consultant, and I felt like a huge fire was lit inside of me. I loved being a consultant. My problem had never been about the work, it was more about the right work mode.
    “I realized that the 10 years I had volunteered as an executive director had prepared me for entrepreneurial life. I knew how to create and fund big programs. I knew how to build a network and mobilize people to a cause. I knew how to sell and market. So, now that I had my own shingle out, I took off and built a thriving and fulfilling practice.
    “This year, I celebrate 20 years in business for myself. It hasn’t always been easy, but it continues to bring me great joy and satisfaction.”
    4. Tara Gentile

    I supported this comment above

  84. My co contestants 2020 I welcome you all to the 65 day to 73 Day of our voting and commenting phase

    As a budding entrepreneur, I think envision myself asking you much questions than scoring your creative idea via project which I have read and examine and fine it recommendable.

    But now I want to ask you, are you focused?
    Did you really know what motivate you as an aspiring entrepreneur?
    Have you done the on line training?
    Or have you under gone the major 8 courses in the online training?
    Have you known that the SEC course focus on sustainable entrepreneurship?
    Or inspires you in your idea nor project?
    Are you unconventional?
    Did you know that simplicity is the ultimate perfection?

    If you are 100 percent sure of yourself, then why can you start improving on your concept finally

    If NO, why did you not take the on line training courses that is free?
    Why are not reading the Brains versus Capital book?

    Day 65

    Campus members, did you in Brazil nobody eats chicken feet? Nor do they eat them in Argentina and the other South American countries. And Brazil and Argentina are among the worlds leading producers of chickens. What happen to the chicken feet there? They are thrown away. You can imagine how the story ends. You can read all about it in a brief report in the Far Eastern Economic review – Rial started coordinating the stream of chicken feet going from South America to Asia. He discovered something that already existed and ensured that the chicken feet would be used well?

    Day 66

    Campus member, how can you recognize that your entrepreneurial design is mature?

    The answer is simple, you feel it, deep and intuitively and innately

    Day 67

    What does innovation really mean? Campus member, this your question today.

    Without mincing word, did you know creating something new using new combinations?

    Day 68

    Campus member, which of the following examples of Discovering the potential in what is already available were not mentioned in the text of the book Brains versus Capital

    Campus member, the answer is the car.

    Day 69

    Campus member, is Function not Convention part of Brains versus Capital course or Social Entrepreneurship Course?
    Please check it out in the online training now.

    Day 70

    If you want to deal in a product, do not ask about the details, for example about the packaging, wrapping the pallet is, retailers, wholesalers, importers, exporters or other marketing structures; simply ask yourself, how can I bring the product from its source to the customer, how can I can organize the process as simply as possible and make use of components?

    Campus member, is the above quote under Function, not Convention? Yes, or No?

    Day 71

    Campus member, is simplicity part of Function, not Convention?

    Day 72

    Campus member, based on Function, not Convention, is simplicity an ultimate perfection? Is simplify a good principle?
    Complexity is it an entrepreneurs enemy?

    Day 73

    Campus member, how did Joseph Schumpeter define entrepreneurs?

    The answer is a Creative destroyers

    Day 74

    Campus member, how do you rework an old establish process?

    Campus member, the answer is that you simply have to begin by fundamentally thinking it through in a new way.

    Day 75

    Campus member, is Recombining what already exists part of Brains versus Capital Course or Social Entrepreneurship Course?

    Check the Brains versus Capital book

  85. Imitate Jessica, especially all young female entrepreneurs from Africa, take a stand now

  86. Campus members do you know this

    In the meantime the growth markets in the globalizing world have moved to other field , while we Germans still cling to image and notions of an industrialized society that are increasingly unrealistic. Tourism is a field we should perhaps consider.

  87. We were supposed to be touring, but we ended up sitting in a café, talking. I’ll never forget what he said: “I’m just living for the sake of living.

    this is veracious

  88. She was born in Detroit, Michigan to Ugandan parents. She attended St. John’s University in New York City where she obtained a Bachelor of Arts in English and then the London School of Economics where she acquired a master’s degree in international development.

    i agree with this

  89. Although she started travelling at the age of six, after completing college, she worked at a pharmaceutical company for two years, taught English in Japan and worked as a consultant for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation before finally becoming a travel blogger.

    I agree with Julius

  90. Jessica Nabongo (born 1984) is a Ugandan-American travel blogger and brand influencer. She is the first black woman to have travelled to every country in the world.
    We catch up with Jessica Nabongo, founder of Jet Black and the first black woman to visit every country in the world.
    Learn from her members!

    in deed she is still a vibrant and focused entrepreneur

    Unconventional in that perspective bye

  91. Campus members do you know l support what Julius said 11/09/ 2020

    The easiest way to get to former French colonies, particularly in Africa, would be by flying through Paris — the French airlines there will have a monopoly because of the diaspora.

  92. The economic factors that affect the growth of entrepreneurship are the following:
    Capital. …
    Labor. …
    Raw Materials. …
    Market. …
    Infrastructure. …
    Caste Factor.
    There are certain cultural practices and values in every society which influence the’ actions of individuals. …
    Family Background.
    How do entrepreneurs identify opportunities?
    Entrepreneurs analyse information at hand to find opportunities where others did not see any. Dharmdasa searched for new business opportunities. The small trade business that he started in 1942 has expanded its operation in many fields including construction, timber and health care with more than 4,000 employees.
    What is the most common reason given for why people choose to become entrepreneurs?
    What is the most common reason given for why people choose to become entrepreneurs? To make a lot of money. To escape the long hours associated with corporate jobs. To be their own boss.
    What are the types of entrepreneurs?
    Here are the different types of entrepreneurship:
    Small business entrepreneurship.
    Large company entrepreneurship.
    Scalable startup entrepreneurship.
    Social entrepreneurship.
    Innovative entrepreneurship.
    Hustler entrepreneurship.
    Imitator entrepreneurship.
    Researcher entrepreneurship.

  93. Anonymous

    12.09.2020 · Reply

    According to a recent report, Black women are working incrediby hard to improve the country, but are receiving very little support.

  94. Anonymous

    12.09.2020 · Reply

    The fastest growing group of entrepreneurs in the country, Black women are still struggling to land leadership roles in various industries.

  95. Anonymous

    12.09.2020 · Reply

    However, this isn’t news to Black women. We know and have been told from day one that we must work twice as hard to get even a little of what others have.

  96. Anonymous

    12.09.2020 · Reply

    Black women will continue to thrive, grow, and make our way in the world. But, ladies, if you ever feel discouraged or need inspiration, just look to these successful women who’ve carved out a place for themselves.

  97. Anonymous

    12.09.2020 · Reply

    TYRA BANKS
    Tyra Banks isn’t just a pretty face. This former Victoria Secret model has taken her good looks to the small screen with several cycles of America’s Next Top Model.

  98. Anonymous

    12.09.2020 · Reply

    IMAN
    After 20 years as a revered fashion model, Iman retired from the runway to start her eponymous cosmetics line in 1994 to cater to women of color who struggled to find shades for darker complexions. As of today the line is worth over $25 million and found in more than 10 countries.

  99. In addition to juliusanayochukwu’s comment, JANICE BRYANT HOWROYD
    Bryant Howroyd founded her employment staffing firm, ACT-1, in 1978 with just $1,500, a small office and a telephone.

  100. 34 years later, ACT-1 is the largest American company of its kind owned by a woman of color, with over 70 branches nationwide.

  101. OPRAH WINFREY
    Oprah Winfrey may be best known for her work as a daytime talk show host, but she’s making waves as the creator of the Oprah Winfrey Network. She’s the second African-American woman to start her own network (after Cathy Hughes). Not to mention, she founded Harpo Productions in the late 80s. Today, Forbes puts her worth at over $2.7 billion.

  102. MADAME C.J. WALKER
    Madame C.J. Walker is best known as America’s first Black female self-made millionaire. A daughter of former slaves, Walker worked in a barbershop for only $1.50 a day before she created a homemade remedy that helped her hair regrow after suffering a scalp condition.

  103. Anonymous

    12.09.2020 · Reply

    According to juliuschiemezue’s comment,

    TINA WELLS also,
    CEO Tina Wells founded the Buzz Marketing Group in 1996 to help companies capture the youth market’s tastes and attitudes. Her company utilizes social media and trendspotting and other research tools for clients like Nike, Steve Madden and MAC Cosmetics. Wells is also the author of Chasing Youth Culture and Getting It Right.

  104. Anonymous

    12.09.2020 · Reply

    Is there a restriction of flights coming from countries severely affected by COVID-19?
    Yes. The Federal Government of Nigeria issued a ban on all international flights effective from the 23rd of March 2020 except for emergency and essential flights for an initial period of time. However, domestic flights within Nigeria have resumed with appropriate safety protocols in place.
    What are the best practices to stop COVID-19 transmission?
    Clean hands and cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or bent elbow at all times. Avoid crowded places, close-contact settings and confined and enclosed spaces with poor ventilation. Ensure good ventilation in indoor settings, including homes and offices. Stay home if feeling unwell and call your medical provider as soon as possible to determine whether medical care is needed. In countries or areas where COVID-19 is circulating, health workers should use medical masks continuously during all routine activities in clinical areas in health care facilities.
    What are some recommendations and advice for the public in case of a COVID-19 outbreak?
    If you are in an area where there is an outbreak of COVID-19 you need to take the risk of infection seriously. Follow the advice issued by national and local health authorities. Although for most people COVID-19 causes only mild illness, it can make some people very ill. More rarely, the disease can be fatal. Older people, and those with preexisting medical conditions (such as high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes) appear to be more vulnerable.
    What percentage of patients with COVID-19 need to be hospitalized?
    Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing special treatment, and for the majority – especially for children and young adults – illness due to COVID-19 is generally minor. However, for some people it can cause serious illness. Around 1 in every 5 people who are infected with COVID-19 develop difficulty in breathing and require hospital care. People who are aged over 60 years, and people who have underlying medical conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, respiratory disease or hypertension are among those who are at greater risk.

  105. Educating yourself on antiracism and white privilege or even bringing awareness to the racial injustices our country is currently facing is a great first step in creating change, but it can’t stop there. You might even be asking yourself after reading a book or posting an Instagram story, “now what?”

  106. One of the major ways we can support the black community especially black women-owned businesses beyond social media is with our spending power. The disparity between white-owned and black-owned businesses prove that the economy hasn’t been in favor of black-run businesses. Although over 50% of women-owned businesses are women of color, they only brought in 422 billion dollars in revenue vs white women-owned businesses who brought in 1.4 trillion dollars in revenue. The State Of Women Owned Businesses Report also stated that four million new jobs and $981 billion in revenue would be added if average revenue of minority women-owned firms matched that of white women-owned businesses. Additionally, it was found that Black women-owned businesses earned average revenue of $24,000 per firm vs. $142,900 among all women-owned businesses. The gap between black women-owned businesses’ average revenue and all women-owned businesses is the greatest of any minority.

    Not only are consumers being encouraged to shift their spending power, but major retailers are also being encouraged to include black-owned businesses on their shelves. The 15% percent pledge is a petition that was created for major box retailers to pledge 15% of their shelf space to black-owned businesses. Here are black female founders to know and support now and always.

  107. Campus members the article ‘ This Entrepreneur is the first black woman to travel to every country ‘ is inspiring., motivating and challenging.

  108. Nabongo is a travel influencer who has gained a level of fame by popularizing her pursuit to become the first black woman to visit every country.
    She has turned her passion into a record. I ‘m really inspired if I have my way will wanna be like her in the future.

  109. I love to travel. I feel like it’s really a chance to get out of your comfort zone. When you explore the world, you often feel much more connected.

  110. Her story really inspired me as an upcoming entrepreneur. I will wanna explore just like Jessica, I feel like the world community is something that’s so powerful and it’s so often we get stuck in our own sort of little microcosm and we don’t go out and we don’t explore.

  111. I also think that there’s just something so inspiring about being in another place and seeing how other people live and talking to people and seeing what customs are different. I’m totally inspired by her and quasi- obsessed with because I’ve been following her on Instagram .

  112. In October 2019, Jessica Nabongo became the first black woman to travel to every country in the world. Not only is Nabongo an expert traveler, but she has a wealth of knowledge on international tourism and development. Between her Master’s degree from the London School of Economics, being employed by
    the UN, starting two tourism-focused companies, and hitting all 195 counties in the world, Nabongo is going to give us the scoop on how to be the ultimate jetsetter.

  113. So she’s going to be able to tell us what her favorites were, what her least favorites were, and why. And also why it’s so important that we all sort of think of ourselves as citizens of the world.

    Must woman traveling on our own, oftentimes people feel scared or they feel like they should be scares.

  114. I guess. She’s going to tell us not to be
    scared and that this isn’t even really about being brave or not. This is just about being yourself and being open to other people and other cultures and really wanting to have a sense of adventure about learning more. Because when you’re out in a new
    place, things smell different, they look different, they taste different. Your senses become really alive in a way that they just don’t when you’re experiencing the same thing day in and day out.

  115. We’re going to talk to Jessica, So without
    further ado, here is our world traveler, Jessica Nabongo, with Emily Kumler.

    Happy reading.

  116. Jessica Nabongo: Hey everyone. My name is Jessica
    Nabongo and I consider myself to be a global citizen, a world traveler, and an entrepreneur. And I feel like I’ve lived 12 lifetimes. That’s what I always joke and say, starting from being raised in Detroit, Michigan by Ugandan immigrants, graduating from undergrad and doing the corporate thing for two years, teaching English in Japan, traveling the world, studying
    at the London School of Economics, working for the United Nation. And then ultimately, there were a couple more jobs in there, but ultimately deciding that I wanted to do my own thing via entrepreneurship. So in 2015, I launched my boutique travel agency, which is called Jet Black and we focus on tourism to Africa, Central and South America, and the Caribbean
    because having my background in international development and having worked for the UN, I really felt like charity wasn’t the answer and I felt like if we’re really going to see economic growth in low income countries, it’s really about supporting small and medium enterprises through private sector
    partnerships. That’s why I decided to start my travel agency and I focus on making sure that when we’re working with vendors, they are vendors that are based in the countries that we’re visiting. We go to restaurants that are owned by local people and really making sure that I’m giving my clients a deep
    dive into culture, but also, you know, great accommodations, luxury accommodations as well. And recently, I launched The Catch , which is an eCommerce platform, which houses my luxury
    lifestyle brand, where basically I get to travel around the world and shop and bring these goodies to you. So we pay the artisans for the items that we’re buying from them, but then we take 20% of the profits and we pay like children’s school fees and we pay for health care for the community and things of that nature, really to make sure that as we’re shopping in
    these lower income countries, we’re also bringing economic value to them. And lastly, and the reason that a lot of people recently have come to know me, I recently finished traveling to all 195 countries, which made me the first black woman to visit every country in the world.

  117. Emily Kumler:
    Congratulations on that. That’s a
    big one.

    Jessica Nabongo:
    Thank you so much.

    Emily Kumler:
    One of the things that I’m always
    interested in when I talk to people who have sort of learned from working within a system and then have found ways that they think they can be more efficient outside of the system, which I think you fit into that category, you know, what sort of was the impetus or like what was it that inspired you to say, you know what? I can do this on my own and actually maybe it’s
    tourism that could be the sort of stimulation in the local economy level to help make change that we’re not able to do when we try to do these sort of big global charities or initiatives?

  118. Jessica Nabongo:
    I love data. I’m a numbers person. And
    like all of the research in the international development space shows that the UN and a lot of these other organizations, they’re really top heavy. And so much of the budget goes to the cost of staff. And you know, I was living in Rome, I was making a good salary. They paid for my housing. I lived like
    maybe a block and a half from the Coliseum. I was living a really good life. But then for me, I think about, you know, when I went on trips for work or like just when I travel I’m like, okay, so I’m making this money and I’m doing these things but is it really affecting the people that are meant to be effected? And so because travel has been such a huge part of my life since I was young, thanks to my mom and dad, I really decided on travel and tourism because that is an economy or like a vertical, if you will, that affects so many people. So
    when you have an increase in tourism, there are more people using taxis, there are more people shopping in markets, there are more people staying in hotels. So then you know, there are more people who are able to be housekeepers, work the front desk, be managers, serve in restaurants, and all that. So I just feel like tourism is an amazing sector for any country just because of the amount of people that are affected by a
    single tourist visit.

  119. Emily Kumler:
    It sounds like you’re going to all of these places and then you’re kind of coming up with, here’s what the itinerary should be like, here are the restaurants that we recommend. How much research do you have to do for a trip like that? I mean like let’s just, you could pick any country I guess, and sort of tell me a little bit about what that process is like. Because I feel like as somebody who really loves to travel myself, I also feel like I’m willing to take risks. Right? And like I’ll go try eating in a bunch of places that other people might not want to try. So, you know, sort of trying to make those, I guess judgment calls along the way, and you clearly are an expert traveler, so you probably have figured out all kinds of tricks that I’ve never even thought of that I would love to hear.

  120. Jessica Nabongo:
    Well, yeah, I mean I think the biggest thing is that I have been to every country. And so when I decide to do trips somewhere, it’s because I went to that place
    and I loved it. So in 2015, our first trip, was actually to
    Haiti . A lot of people are like, what? Haiti for tourism? Not voluntourism or like mission trips and all of this other stuff? And I’m like, no, pure tourism. And we actually had an issue with a girl on one of our trips because she brought shoes to give away. And I told her, I’m like, we’re not doing that if you want to do that, you do that on another trip. And so there was a little friction there just because for me I’m like, no, we’re purely tourists in this space. Do you want to help the
    local economy? Tip your waiters, tip your drivers, tip your housekeepers tip all of those people. But as far as like how I find where to go and what to do, I always manage to connect with local people on the ground and that is incredibly useful as far as where to eat and things like that. And then for trips that we’re launching in 2020, but also, okay, so let me talk about Cuba. Cuba is a place I’ve been four times because I’m obsessed with it. I love it.

  121. Emily Kumler:
    I’ve always wanted to go.

    Jessica Nabongo:
    It’s so amazing and I’ll give you all
    the tips later. But, what I love about it is like I’ve gone
    there and I’ve done trial and error with the restaurants. So now anytime I go and I’m hosting a trip or if I plan a trip for clients, I give them a restaurant list because in Havana, food can be very, very hit or miss. But I give them a list of restaurants that I have personally eaten at. So now as we’re launching our next group of trips for 2020, I’m taking people to some of my favorite countries and then they’re going to get to eat some of my favorite restaurants that I’ve actually eaten at. And if there’s something outside of that where I haven’t eaten, and again, it’s those local connections that I have, and I use my local contacts for guidance.

  122. Emily Kumler:
    So when you were doing all of this traveling, were you developing contacts with the idea that you would be expanding your sort of travel services to those places?

  123. Jessica Nabongo:
    No, I wasn’t, because the thing is a lot of places end up surprising me. Like, actually, this is the first time I’m saying it, but the first trip we’re launching for 2020 is Jordan . I just became obsessed with Jordan, only after I went. So before I never would have thought, oh, I’m going to plan a trip to Jordan for Jet Black.
    Largely because when we initially launched, we were only doing Africa, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. But now we’re opening up to the whole world. But still, not certain places, like I’ll never do a trip to Thailand because Thailand is overrun with tourists, but a country like Jordan, which does get its fair share of tourism, but I think it deserves a much
    bigger piece of the pie. You know, I never would have thought that I would have been a trip there, but after I went there, I became obsessed just because of like all of the diversity of things you can do. You have Amman , which is a really cool city with great restaurants and amazing hotel options. You have the
    Dead Sea, you have the Red Sea, you have Wadi Rum , which is like an otherworldly desert. You have Petra , which is one of the world wonders. So it just has so much to offer, and I love the people, so I was like, okay, I have to do a Jet Black trip here.

  124. Emily Kumler:
    I love that. So that is sort of like an inspiration. And then as a woman traveling in Jordan, I’ve traveled around the Middle East like alone, which was I think scarier for everybody back home than it was actually for me. But I’m curious, you know, do you have any sort of recommendations about places that you feel like are way more friendly or open to, you know, women, even Western women, than the conventional wisdom sort of suggests? And then also, I would love to know if there are places where you felt it was more hostile than you had expected.

  125. Jessica Nabongo:
    I love that question. So, I think the world, generally, is pretty safe. It’s funny because I was talking to someone earlier and they had the same thing where
    they were traveling to the Middle East solo and their family was going crazy. I actually find Muslim countries to be some of the best for solo female travel, which I think a lot of people wouldn’t consider that. But that has been my experience. Some of my best experiences being alone as a woman, have been in the Muslim world, so Jordan, which is the safest place in the Middle East, is a great place to start. Largely I would say because they’re a little more liberal compared to their neighbors and they also produce some amazing red wines if you’re interested in that.

  126. Emily Kumler:
    Well, so you can drink there, too?
    Because a lot of countries in the Middle East you cannot.

    Jessica Nabongo:
    Yup, exactly. That’s why I mentioned that. You can absolutely drink there. Yeah. Like there are no barriers anywhere that I’ve seen Jordan. I actually went to an
    event when I was there, sponsored by of their wine companies, the Jordan River Wine Company. They had this amazing outdoor event when I was there last year. And it’s nice because it’s a little more liberal. You don’t have to cover your head. But you know, anytime you’re in a Muslim country, I definitely think err on the side of conservative as far as dress. And that’s what I would recommend throughout the Middle East. Even
    those places that seem a little more liberal, you just want to make sure that you’re being very respectful of the country.
    Because as long as it’s a Muslim majority country, even though some people are liberal, you still have very conservative people and you want to be careful not to offend anyone. Because for me, as long as I’m a visitor in your country, I’m going to adhere to your rules and make sure that I’m not offending you. Obviously there are some countries like Iran or Somalia where you have to cover your head 100% of the time. Saudi has changed. You don’t have to anymore. But always, definitely lean toward the conservative side. But as far as like hostile towards women or where I felt uncomfortable purely because of my gender, I would say India is probably the only place where I felt like as a woman. I just simply felt uncomfortable.

  127. Emily Kumler:
    Well and they’re having some major problems with rape .

    Jessica Nabongo: Yeah. Gang rapes on buses. Pretty
    awful. Throwing acid on women . Yeah. I mean I don’t know enough about Indian culture or the history to understand what on earth is going on there, but some pretty scary stuff and what I find fascinating, because I also, well obviously, I went to Pakistan. India is amazing, right? India has some amazing places to visit. Like Udaipur and Jaipur and Agra with Taj Mahal and Delhi and all the colors and spices and everything.
    India is amazing for those things. But as far as being a solo female traveler, I recommend Pakistan. If you want to go to that South Asia region, I think that Pakistan is just a bit better if you’re a woman traveling alone.

  128. Emily Kumler:
    Why is that you think?

    Jessica Nabongo:
    I think religion. I think Islam plays a huge role. And I think Islam gets a bad rap. And obviously there are some bad people who are Muslims in the same way that there are bad people who are Christian, right? But you can’t ascribe that bad behavior to the religion because Islam is very respectful of women. And what I found in Pakistan, let me tell you from the moment I was in Oman and I was boarding a flight to Islamabad, there were only men in line at check in. I was like, oh my God, I felt so uncomfortable. And so when I got to
    the counter I was like, hey, can you give me a seat by myself? I just don’t want to be surrounded by men on the plane. And they gave me a whole row, you know? And no one did anything to me. But I think as a woman, our little spidey senses go crazy
    when we’re the only woman in a space, right? As women, we’re socialized to be afraid of men in some regards. Or we’re like always trying to protect ourselves and make sure we don’t get assaulted or whatever. But you know what? Everyone was so nice.
    And like even when I got off the plane, men were very
    respectful. They would step to the side, me walk in front. One man, he said, oh, you’re traveling alone. Do you need any help? Like what are you here for? And I said, tourism, just, you know, very polite conversation. I was sitting there waiting for my luggage. He brought me a luggage cart. I didn’t even request it, but you know, and like even when I was leaving, he
    said, you know, I hope you have a great time in the country. And that was the experience I had throughout Pakistan. So I did Islam a bad, and I did Lahore and I did like a road trip. I ended up taking a private car, but even Pakistani women were like, oh, you can just take the bus. Like it’s fine. Pakistan is a very safe country, I find, for female travelers. And again, this is like, I knew Pakistani women who were telling me what to do. And I met many Pakistani men who I hung out with who were photographers. And I felt completely safe the entire time. I never felt like people were, you know, ogling me or anything like that. So that’s why I highly recommend Pakistan.

  129. Emily Kumler:
    And then was there any place that you felt uncomfortable? I mean, I guess you said India would be the one that you would sort of say, which is so hard
    because it’s such a big country too, right? That it’s probably like there are different regions that would be more hostile towards women. Although, I don’t know, Dehli is such a big city and I feel like there’s constantly news coming out of Delhi that’s scary.

  130. Jessica Nabongo:
    Yeah. So I mean, I haven’t been to the South, so a lot of people talk about Kerala , Goa , and the people are way more chill. You know, I think anybody who lives
    near the ocean or any body of water, they tend to just be more relaxed.

  131. Emily Kumler:
    Oh my God, I love that. And as somebody who’s traveled to every country in the entire world, you should know that really cool observation.

  132. Jessica Nabongo:
    It’s very real. Like island behavior is the same. It doesn’t matter which country in the world, like people who live on islands or near bodies of water, they tend to be way more like relaxed and chill.

  133. Emily Kumler:
    Okay. So speaking of which, you have a great sort of vignette of swimming with whales in the South Pacific. Can you tell me about that? That’s like a fantasy of mine.

  134. Jessica Nabongo:
    The thing is I didn’t even know it was happening. You know, I was traveling at such a rapid pace, I didn’t have a ton of time to do any research. What’s awesome is like I work with really dope hotel partners and so I stayed at Fafa Island Resort , which was super nice and very beautiful and they were like, well, do you want to go swimming with whales? It’s the season. Then I’m like, yeah? I didn’t know what it entailed. But I was like, yeah, sign me up. So the
    first day that we went out, we didn’t swim with any whales and it was kind of disappointing. Like we had an amazing time being on the water and like we went to a deserted island and that was great. And I got great drone footage. But we didn’t get to swim with any whales. We saw them in the distance, but you’re
    basically chasing them. And some of them are like, okay cool, I’ll hang out with you. And some of them are like, no, I don’t want to play today. So that’s what happened the first day. And the second day I decided, I said, you know what? I’m going to just go again and make it happen. It’s obviously not super cheap. But I said, I’m going to go again, and it was incredible, because you spot the whale, but then you have to
    kind of hang out and see if they want to hang out and play. And this one whale we were with wanting to just stay and play all day and it was incredible because they come pretty close.

  135. Emily Kumler:
    Is that scary? I mean, I feel like, how big was it? Do you know what kind of whale it was?

    Jessica Nabongo:
    Oh, it was a Humpback. It’s huge.

  136. Emily Kumler:
    I mean, that’s kind of terrifying,
    right? Because like one slap of the tail and like. . .

  137. Jessica Nabongo:
    Oh, exactly. It’s bigger than the boat that you’re on. And so when I first got in, like in the video clip, you’ll see me, I’m kinda like, ah. And then I got much more comfortable as we kept going in and out. Because they’re like turning, the one we were with, she was like turning around and you can kind of, I don’t know if they’re waving, but you know, they’re definitely aware of you. And they know that they’re there and they’re playing with you and they’re enjoying it. So it’s really cool, yeah.

  138. Emily Kumler:
    Yeah. And then the other place I wanted to ask you about, because I think there was a quote that I read where you talked about visiting North Korea and it not really being that different.

  139. Jessica Nabongo:
    So I spent six days in North Korea. I always say, what was the weirdest thing was how normal it felt. So, there was no advertisements. So that’s quite different, right? There’s not that sensory overload of flashing
    lights or whatever and there’s not that many like storefronts. So that is definitely totally different. But from the “normal” side of things, like you see people on the subway going to work, you see the couples sitting in the park. We ran into a group of college kids that we chatted with like outside of a library. You see kids that are on field trips at like some of the monuments we went to. We saw a wedding taking place, like you know, people doing wedding pictures. And so I think, you know, this is a place that we don’t know much about and it’s a place that in the Western world at least, the images that we see have nothing to do with like the people living their normal lives. Right? Same with Iran, same thing with Saudi Arabia. We
    don’t really get a sense of what is a normal life there
    because people are living normal lives everywhere in the world, despite like war and everything. There are people like just living and working every single day. And what I loved about this journey to every country in the world is that I got to see that. But not only did I get to see it, but my followers got to see it as well.

  140. Emily Kumler:
    And so did you have to have any special handlers or like was it really hard to get a visa or how did you manage all those details?

  141. Jessica Nabongo:
    Nope. For me it was super easy. If you’re an American, it is not easy because the U.S. Government has made it illegal for American citizens to travel to North Korea . I’m also Ugandan citizen. So, you basically find like a
    travel agency. I went with a company called Koryo I think. And yeah, like they do the visa for you, you pay your money, they do your visa, you show up like the day before in Beijing to get like a bit of a briefing and then you fly all together from Beijing. And then you have like a Western tour guide. Mine was American, Irish American. And then you have a North Korean
    tour guide. Well we had two. And then there was someone who was kind of doing an internship.

  142. Emily Kumler:
    And so are there any ways around that? I mean, I know people who want to come to the United States for like a wedding or an event or whatever often like go
    through other countries so that they’re not coming from, let’s say Syria, right? They’re coming from Jordan and. that’s easier to get from Jordan to the United States than it is from Syria.
    So they like go spend a month in Jordan and get their visa from there to here. Are there work arounds like that for Americans?

  143. Jessica Nabongo:
    Nope. It is the United States Government that has made it illegal for their citizens to travel to North Korea. So there is no work around. North Korea doesn’t care.

  144. Emily Kumler:
    That’s so interesting. Jessica Nabongo: Yeah. I mean they say like you as citizens are in danger of detention and death. That is not true, because they knew I was a U.S. citizen as well, because I was going back to Beijing, so, even though I came to North Korea on my Ugandan passport, I had to show my American passport because my Chinese visa was in my American passport. So they knew that I was both, but they don’t care.

  145. Emily Kumler:
    Iran is the same way, right?

    Jessica Nabongo:
    Yeah. So Iran, Americans can go to Iran, but government hasn’t made it illegal. I’ve heard that it’s difficult for Americans to get visas, but you have to go
    through a travel agency. Luckily as a Ugandan, we get visas on arrival and we can stay in the country for 15 days, which is awesome.

  146. Emily Kumler:
    Wow. I mean, there’s something so, I guess surprising is not really the right word, but it sort of sums it up of like as an American, people think like, oh, I live in the country of the free, I can go do all these things.
    And actually like having a Ugandan passport allows you access to more places.

  147. Jessica Nabongo:
    Yeah. And so the thing is, well, not more places but different places. So there’s this really amazing website that I love called Passport Index . And
    basically what it allowed me to do was to put in both the U.S. And Uganda and then it compares it to every country in the world. And I can very easily see which countries I have access to with which passport. So, with the U.S. passport I have access to 170 countries, either visa free or visa on arrival.
    And with Uganda, it’s only 73. But the one reason that I chose to use my Ugandan passport where I could, where it was relatively easy, like apples to apples if like I had to apply for a visa and it’s the same whether you’re Ugandan or American, then I would try to apply with my Ugandan passport.
    And the reason I did that is because I want to show travelers coming from, you know, weak passport countries, which Uganda would be considered one, that you can still travel the world.
    So I think I traveled to like 49 countries or something around there on my Ugandan passport, which is more than most Ugandans will ever travel to in their lifetimes. So when I do talks on the continent, a lot of people complain about the visa thing and I’m like, well why don’t you go to countries that don’t require you to have a visa? You know, a lot of people want to
    go to Europe and they want to go to the U.S., and obviously I’m coming from a position of privilege where I can access those places, but I’m like, if you just want to travel more and you are spending a ton of money on visas , go where you have visa free access.

  148. Emily Kumler:
    Well yeah and I think it’s just such an interesting point to make, right, too, that the way the world is set up right now, if you don’t have dual citizenship, you actually can’t go to every country in the world.

  149. Jessica Nabongo:
    No, you cannot. You can’t.

  150. Emily Kumler: Taking that one step farther, were there places that you felt like, would be really great for Americans to experience that Americans are not generally experiencing?

  151. Jessica Nabongo:
    Yeah. I mean I loved Iran. Like Iran is definitely one of my favorite countries. It’s one of the most beautiful, the people are absolutely amazing and I think a
    lot of Americans don’t experience because they’re afraid, right? They hear the word Iran and they’re like, ah, terrorism or whatever other figments of their imagination they come up with. And one thing that I’ve tried to do with my platform through this journey is I’m like, a lot of it is like trying to help change the narrative around a lot of these countries. A lot of people are anti Saudi Arabia now because of what happened with Khashoggi who was murdered in Turkey, which was
    absolutely horrendous and horrific, period. That was
    horrendous, horrific. I feel like, you know, we sort of like swept that under the rug on our side, even though he was a U.S. citizen. And so I’ve seen like a lot of people firing back at influencers because Saudi Arabia is now for the first time trying to open up completely to tourism. I was there in December 2018. It was the first time they gave any tourist visas and it was linked to, their formula E car race . And now
    they’re opening up. And I saw a lot of criticism because influencers were going there and being paid to be there and people were saying, oh, this government, you know, murdered this journalist, which is horrendous. But to that I say, what about what the U.S. government is doing? The U.S. government
    is putting children in cages. So do you suggest that everyone stop traveling to the U.S. for tourism? Like, you know, like there’s so many governments in the world that are doing such horrendous things. And for me, politics and the government exist on a different plane than tourism, because even like what I recently, you know, the U.S. government has stopped all travel to Cuba except to Havana because they’re trying to put a squeeze on the government. When you stop traveling, when you use economic sanctions against governments, it only hurts the, like regular people. These governments, they’re corrupt. They have access to money. So when you stop economic activity in a country, you’re squeezing the pockets of regular, everyday people. That’s why, and I have a master’s degree from the London School of Economics. I’ve studied international development. I’ve worked for the UN. I really understand what this looks like on the ground and it’s just not a good tool. And I also just don’t understand why we’re still on this whole Cuba, anti-Cuba thing. But yeah, and Cuba is another place
    I’ve been four times. I’m mildly obsessed with it. It’s
    another place where Americans have a lot of hurdles in order to visit it.

  152. Emily Kumler:
    Right. And I feel like you do have such a wealth of knowledge about this from so many different angles, which other people don’t have. Is there a remedy that
    you think would be better than the economic sanctions? Because I tend to agree that like, you know, when you squeeze the average person, you’re also more likely to increase all kinds of corruption and violence and extremism and all this stuff that we don’t want. So what is the solution? Not to put it all on you, but I’m curious. I’m sure you’ve thought about it.

  153. Jessica Nabongo:
    Well, my big solution would be mind your own damn business. I think, you know, the way that the world has evolved since World War II is such that the Western
    world feels like it has the right to be involved in other
    people’s business. And that’s really what we’re seeing. And I just feel like what gives you the right to go in and monitor someone’s elections when no one is coming here and monitoring our elections. So you know, what I would love to see, honestly, is like the G-100, which is like basically developing countries versus like the G-7 as most people know. I would
    like to see them sort of stand up to the West and say no. Like we’re going to mind our business, our domestic business, and you mind your domestic business and we’ll see where we land on that. You know, we can be trade partners, you know, we can do
    tourism between our countries and we can do that. But as far as domestic affairs, I do think to some extent we sort of need to let people handle it on their own because the thing is like everything is political and everything is about economics. So it’s not like, you know, Cuba is not doing anything to anybody. Like literally, I read the letter that the secretary of state sent to the secretary of transportation. It’s like,
    oh, because the leaders of Cuba are supporting the leaders of Venezuela. What? What do you mean? Our leadership is essentially supporting Russia. What if countries said, okay, we’re stopping all flights to the U.S. because you support Russia? That doesn’t even make sense.

  154. Emily Kumler:
    Well, no, but it’s muscle, right?
    It’s just like, it’s throwing some muscle around and like
    getting your way. I mean, I feel like I just recently read
    about how tourism in the United States is down from China for like the first time in a really, really long time. And people like in New York are freaking out because the Chinese not only were, you know, a big part of the tourism population, but they spent more money than everybody else. You know, the reason for that is because of the trade war and I think because of the
    Trump stuff, right? And so I thought that was really
    interesting because I was sort of like, well this is probably like something that happens all the time in other countries, right? Where the U.S. threatens them with something or whatever and then it affects their other industries. And for us we don’t, we’re sort of big enough that we can weather some of that. But if the Chinese stop coming to the United States, that will be significant.

  155. Jessica Nabongo:
    The times will change. Because even when the Muslim ban happened, it was actually I think the CEO of Marriott who spoke out, because people from the Middle East, while they hadn’t banned like Qatar and Kuwait and Bahrain and UAE, where they have all the money in the Gulf. A lot of their nannies and other staff are from countries that were part of the Muslim ban. Like the hotel industry, they felt it because they’re like, wait, these people from the Gulf aren’t coming and like buying out an entire floor for two months just to come shop and do whatever else they do in New York City. And so it was one of the CEOs, I think it was Marriott, and he spoke out because he’s like, no, we need to get rid of this Muslim ban because it’s affecting our bottom line. And so, I think more and more of that is going to start happening. Like China is a big player now and I think for a long time the U S didn’t have someone balancing their economic power. Now China is that. The Gulf region is that. And so I think it’s going to be really fascinating within the next 10 years how things will change. In particular because unfortunately, we have a president in office who I personally don’t feel like he, or anyone around him, really understands geopolitics as it relates to like the global economy. So I’m really, I’m fascinated just from that perspective to see how the world starts to change.

  156. Emily Kumler:
    Yeah, no, I actually had somebody at USTR , which is like the trade representatives office, tell me on background that if you want to know about the sort of
    geopolitics behind Trump, and certainly all the trade stuff, just watch the interview he did with Oprah . And it’s like in the 80s and he’s talking about Japan, but they were like, that’s his entire education when it comes to trade. And it’s like kind of, if you’re interested in like sort of profiling people, it’s a fascinating interview because it is archaic.
    Like it’s not relevant anymore in this global economy, but it was how it was and so you could kind of like threaten and bully and do all this stuff. But now, it’s like most people don’t realize that like the reason NAFTA is so important is because Mexico has trade agreements with everybody. So you can ship out from Mexico, have a factory in Mexico, ship out from there. It’s not because the labor is so much cheaper, right?
    Like that’s the narrative everybody gets here, but it’s because they’ve been really proactive with their trade agreements. I feel like all that stuff has become so much more complex and I totally agree with you. I just think that there’s like a general lack of understanding or knowledge about that kind of stuff. But to bring it back down to sort of the personal travel level, I feel like you and I could talk for hours. One of the things that I’m really curious about is, I was in Peru this summer. You know, everybody sort of tells you to bargain, right? And that like, you know, you go to these markets and they have all these beautiful things for sale and you want to bring them home and they’re all very inexpensive, right? And most of the people, I was traveling with the Q’ero Indians , so I was like in remote areas and a lot of times at the hotels we
    were staying at, there would be like two women who are selling the things that they have made by hand, right, and that they’re using to support their whole village. And I, a couple days into the trip, got really upset about the idea that I as a, you know, middle-class or whatever Western woman who could
    afford to go on this trip, I was going to haggle with two
    women who were supporting their entire village. And people were like, well, you have to do it because otherwise like they’ll take advantage. And I got really annoyed because I was like, they’re not going to take advantage of me. Like, I could actually help them. But then I sort of realized that I was disrupting a system. I didn’t want to be disrespectful, but I kind of felt like, you know, I wanted to help them. Like, I talked to many of those women, I like sat and talked to them for a long time and I liked them. Do you know what I mean? So if I could help them in some way, I wanted to, but I also realized that I was like going up against something that was probably in place for a reason. And I’m sort of curious like when it comes to bargaining or tipping or any of that kind of stuff, if somebody does want to help a local economy, I know
    you mentioned earlier like tip your drivers, but how do you feel about that kind of stuff?

  157. Jessica Nabongo:
    Yeah, so I think tipping is great. I think over paying for goods in the market disrupts the market.
    Because say like someone else in the market hasn’t had a woman like you who is like paying five times the price of a good because you’re like, oh well in my context it is still cheap.
    I handle all the time. It’s one of my favorite sports. I think I’ve won the Olympic gold in it. But yeah, I think you have to find a fine balance. You can’t go into a place and give one person $100. That’s not helping really anyone. It really truly is disrupting the market. You’ll never know the price of things, but when you haggle, no one is ever going to give it to you less than cost. That is never going to happen. I’ve definitely done it and people are like, no. And I’m like, oh,
    okay. I went too far. Okay here, give it to me for this. And they’re like, okay, we can do that. So that’s the one thing to start with. They’re never going to give it to you for a price less than they paid for it. They’re just not like not, that’s just never ever going to happen. Great example, we were in Morocco, and we wanted these poufs, like little Ottomans or whatever you want to call them. I call them poufs.

  158. Emily Kumler:
    I know exactly what a pouf is. Jessica Nabongo: Yes. I’m looking at three of them in my house right now. We went to this one place and I think they were trying to charge, let’s call it 50 USD, right? And so we had all haggled down, but we were starting from such a high
    price point and we were like, oh, okay. And then, maybe not 50 maybe like 30 or something. And then we all bought a bunch of stuff and then we go to another place and the stuff is like 20% of the cost that we all just paid. We’re like, what? So some of us, me and my friend, like my one friend, he was just
    so angry because he paid a lot. He overpaid a lot and so we went back and we demanded our money back because we’re like, no, like absolutely not. Like these are just simply not the prices. And we got our money back. But you have to hagglebecause the fact of the matter is they are going to take advantage of you because they’re like, okay, you don’t speak my language, you’re a foreigner, you have more money because you’re coming from either the U.S. or Europe, and they do take advantage of that. So I think you just have to temper it. I think negotiating is important. Try to understand local pricing. So I rely on like if I’m with a taxi driver or I’m with a guide, you know, I’m like, okay, well what would you pay for it? Now I’ll pay more than what a local would pay, because that makes sense, right? It makes sense that I’m paying a premium, but I’m not paying like five times the price
    because that just doesn’t make sense. You have to find a place where you’re comfortable but you can’t disrupt the local market, either.

  159. Emily Kumler:
    Yeah. It’s so interesting, though, because I feel like, so I went to high school for a year in Rome. Portaportese was like my favorite thing to do on a Sunday morning, was like over to the market.

  160. Jessica Nabongo:
    I know it very well.

  161. Emily Kumler:
    And I had so many jeans that I got from Portaportese. And I loved haggling there. It didn’t feel the same as like being in a really rural area with really poor people and like fighting with them over like what, 50 cents?
    You know what I mean? Like that seemed, it just, it honestly like it felt like cruel to me in a way, where it’s like, I don’t care if it’s $5 or $10, like this is beautiful handmade scarf or whatever. And like I totally respect what you’re saying. And like I, I’ll have to think more about it a little bit I think for myself because like it’s not a charity donation, but I do feel like, especially like when people, like women are making things and it takes them like a whole day to make something, right? And it’s like less than I would pay for my latte.

  162. Jessica Nabongo:
    No, for sure. But then you have to think, how much do they need per day to live? Right. They probably need less than the cost of your latte on an everyday basis. You know what I mean? So the context matters. It’s
    funny because I think about another example. I used to live in rural Benin . Benin is one of the poorest countries in the world. And I lived there for six. months. I was working there. And so I would take a zemidjan , which is a motorcycle taxi, every day. So then I would have to do the negotiation thing.
    And like, yeah, at that point, I’m literally negotiating around like five to 10 cents USD. But I’m like, no, I’m not going to pay more than a local person because then like it disrupts the market for all of us.

  163. Emily Kumler:
    Well, yeah, I think it’s differentgif you’re living in a place, too, right, because then you also will be labeled like the sucker for everything.

  164. Jessica Nabongo:
    Right, right, right. Yeah, I think you just have to find balance and understanding context is important. I think the best thing you can do is if you’re with a local guide, ask them for cues, ask them what makes sense,
    what doesn’t make sense. That’s really what I do. I always do a temperature check with a local person. That’s the best advice I can give.

  165. Emily Kumler:
    And so along those same lines, did you have ways, like I know is it like Airbnb or like Meetup or whatever, like there’s all these sites now that have these sort of like activities you can sign up for, and obviously they’re not going to be in every country, but did you have ways of like linking up with other tourists as a way of going and checking stuff out or making new friends or whatever that you would recommend to people?

  166. Jessica Nabongo:
    So I don’t like linking up with other tourists when I’m traveling. I think Airbnb is great. Airbnb Experiences is great in terms of like really getting a local experience. I’ve done it in China and Jordan I think in Lebanon. I don’t know, I’ve done it a few places. Like In New York, like they have really great experiences that’ll give you
    a deep dive into local culture. But for me, luckily because I have my platform on Instagram, every time I would travel I would just post and I would say, hey guys, I’m going to Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan and Syria. Who is here, who should I connect with? And then people would come in and like recommend people for me to connect with. Or people would send
    me messages and say, hey, I’m here. I’d love to host you. And that’s really how I made a lot of my local contacts.

  167. Emily Kumler:
    I guess this is my sort of last
    question. What’s it like to be home?

  168. Jessica Nabongo:
    It’s been great in many ways because this is the first time in two and a half years that I’ve spent more than two weeks in my home. Yeah. And I’m trying to take
    it slow. It hasn’t worked out the way that I thought it would because I just launched The Catch and I just spoke at Forbes under 30. I have a TEDx talk that I am doing in a week, so it hasn’t been like totally relaxing. I haven’t left my house today. I don’t plan on leaving my house for at least the next two days. Yeah. It’s been strange. Like part of me is like, oh, I want to go somewhere. But the other part of me is like, this is really nice. I don’t have to think about packing. So I
    don’t know, it’s a bit strange, but I’m looking forward to
    getting used to staying still and being still for a while. I
    mean, I’m traveling again in like two weeks. The one thing I’d like to add is how plastic is destroying the world. And I think it’s really important as individuals that we are aware of our use of single use plastic, and we try to reduce it where we can, and we try to hold companies accountable. I love Blue Apron and I tweeted them the other day and I’m like, hey, could you stop using all of this plastic in your packaging? It
    is wholly unnecessary and it’s single use. So that is one thing that I really champion. When I travel, I take a reusable cup. So if you think about a flight from like Detroit to Amsterdam, that’s eight hours, it’s at least three drink services and that’s three cups times at least 300 people. That’s 900 cups that are wasted. Whereas like, if you don’t take your own cup, just keep your one cup for the service for the entire flight and then boom, like you’re saving on all the plastic waste.

  169. Emily Kumler:
    So that’s great advice. I think my glass straw made a little clink in the middle of our interview, so I’m totally on board for getting rid of all the straws, too. I feel like it’s just terrible when you look at those pictures of the whales.

  170. Jessica Nabongo:
    Exactly. Exactly.

  171. Emily Kumler:
    Yeah. So I mean, I feel like it’s so great to talk to you and you’re really like such an inspiration. I’m somebody who really loves to travel and I don’t get to do it as much as I would like to, but I feel like
    when I look at things like your Instagram feed or hear what you’re up to, it really does inspire me. We’re all citizens of the world and I feel like it’s really important for people to feel like they can access other places because it’s such a wonderful way to learn about people and like how similar we all are in so many ways. Right?

  172. Jessica Nabongo:
    Yeah, absolutely. And that’s like one of the biggest learning lessons from this journey for me was that we’re more similar than we are different. I really, I
    agree with you. I want people to understand that. And one thing I say is like, we’re all equal shareholders as citizens of this world. You can’t buy more shares. It’s like no. 7 billion people, everyone only has one share on this planet. So I think as long as we remember that, like we’re all human beings, no matter race, or gender, or economic status, or any of those things, like we’re all just people. We all want the same things and you know, let’s all just live and let live and be kind to each other.

  173. Emily Kumler:
    I’m Emily Kumler and that was
    Empowered Health. Thanks for joining us. Don’t forget to check out our website at empoweredhealthshow.com for all the show
    notes, links to everything that was mentioned in the episode, as well as a chance to sign up for our newsletter and get some extra fun tidbits. See you next week.

    • Anonymous

      13.09.2020 · Reply

      Other successful female Enterprenuers:
      TINA WELLS
      CEO Tina Wells founded the Buzz Marketing Group in 1996 to help companies capture the youth market’s tastes and attitudes. Her company utilizes social media and trendspotting and other research tools for clients like Nike, Steve Madden and MAC Cosmetics. Wells is also the author of Chasing Youth Culture and Getting It Right.

  174. Anonymous

    13.09.2020 · Reply

    MADAME C.J. WALKER
    Madame C.J. Walker is best known as America’s first Black female self-made millionaire. A daughter of former slaves, Walker worked in a barbershop for only $1.50 a day before she created a homemade remedy that helped her hair regrow after suffering a scalp condition.

  175. Anonymous

    13.09.2020 · Reply

    LEANNA ARCHER
    This Long Island native started her Leanna Inc. haircare line at just 11-years-old. Yes, 11-years-old. Her all-natural organic hair butters and shampoos have helped her earn over $100,000 in revenue. Her small operation thrives with lots of help from her family.

  176. Anonymous

    13.09.2020 · Reply

    LISA PRICE
    In 1993, Lisa Price started making hair products in her Brooklyn kitchen with just $100. She sold her concoctions at church flea markets and street fairs. Today, her homemade line Carol’s Daughter is a multimillion-dollar line of must-have beauty treats.

  177. Anonymous

    13.09.2020 · Reply

    CATHY HUGHES
    From teenage mother to media power player, Hughes is the founder of Radio One, which includes 53 radio stations in the U.S., and TVOne, a cable network. At one point during the early stages of her career, she lost her home and was forced to live with relatives as she rebuilt her company into what is now one of the biggest media companies in the world.

  178. Anonymous

    13.09.2020 · Reply

    QUEEN LATIFAH
    Sure, Queen Latifah is a model, actress, musician and ESSENCE cover girl, but did you know she’s an entrepreneur? She’s part owner of Flavor Unit Entertainment, a production company specializing in television (it’s behind VH1’s Single Ladies), movies and artist management.

  179. Anonymous

    13.09.2020 · Reply

    SHONDA RHIMES
    ESSENCE Black Women in Hollywood honoree Rhimes is the first African-American woman to create and executive-produce a top 10 primetime television series with ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy; she’s also the woman behind Private Practice and is currently developing Scandal, starring Kerry Washington. The Dartmouth graduate is arguably the most powerful Black woman in Hollywood and one of the most sought-after writers and producers in entertainment.

  180. Anonymous

    13.09.2020 · Reply

    SHEILA JOHNSON
    Johnson made her fortune when she co-founded the BET cable network with her then husband, Bob Johnson. In 2005 she became the first African-American female owner of a WNBA team when she bought into the Washington Mystics basketball team.

  181. In addition to juliusanayochukwu’s comment, CORVIDA RAVEN
    Dubbed the “Oprah of the Web” by her peers, 24-year-old Corvida Raven is a social media entrepreneur and founder of shegeeks.net. She’s also a social media consultant for firms like Chevrolet and Intel and Fast Company .

  182. BEVERLY JOHNSON
    Johnson made a splash when she became the first African-American woman to grace the cover of American Vogue in 1971. She extended her love for all things beautiful when she launched the Beverly Johnson Hair Collection of wigs, skin-care and bath/body products.

  183. Anonymous

    13.09.2020 · Reply

    Other successful black female entrepreneurs,: MARA BROCK AKIL
    The brains behind hit TV shows like Girlfriends, The Game and Moesha, Mara Brock Akil is also the co-founder of Akil Productions with husband Salim Akil, who directed the highly anticipated remake of Sparkle starring Whitney Houston.

  184. Anonymous

    13.09.2020 · Reply

    ANGELA BENTON
    Internet entrepreneur Angela Benton is making her mark in the tech industry as the brains behind three web-based startups: Cued, BlackWeb 2.0 and NewMe Accelarator, an “incubator” for minority-owned tech startups.

  185. This talked about Pearson, the first black woman to travel round the world. Therefore, female Enterprenuers should learn from her.

  186. Anonymous

    13.09.2020 · Reply

    Traveling isn’t just movement, but education and exploration.

  187. All hail Jessica Nabongo, the first black woman to travel the world.

  188. Other successful female Enterprenuers:
    TINA WELLS
    CEO Tina Wells founded the Buzz Marketing Group in 1996 to help companies capture the youth market’s tastes and attitudes. Her company utilizes social media and trendspotting and other research tools for clients like Nike, Steve Madden and MAC Cosmetics. Wells is also the author of Chasing Youth Culture and Getting It Right.

    i support this comment

  189. his talked about Pearson, the first black woman to travel round the world. Therefore, female Enterprenuers should learn from her.

    gregory is right

  190. Traveling isn’t just movement, but education and exploration.

    it is educative and fosters research as well

  191. Did you know that Tourism is a field we should perhaps consider?

  192. Tourism is now the largest economic sector worldwide, with stable growth rates that won’t change as quickly as those in other industries.

  193. Did you know that Jessica is an epitome of goal 5?

  194. Did you know that Jessica is an epitome of empowering young female in entrepreneurship campus?

  195. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    From Jessica Nabongo:

    If you are anything like me you had a ton of travel plans for March, April and even in May that have to be either cancelled or postponed because of COVID-19. As a frequent traveler this is probably my biggest nightmare, but we all have to do our part to slow the spread of this global pandemic. So even for trips that have not been formally canceled, we should all be postponing non-essential travel.

    Below I will share a bit about my experiences of cancelling and postponing plans during this unprecedented time and then I’m going to offer a few tips on how you can cancel and postpone your plans for upcoming travel!

    Three imperatives that we have to remember during this time is to be kind, be patient and be flexible.

    Be kind
    When you are cancelling your plans, whether you are calling an airline, hotel, booking website and other travel related companies, it is really important to be kind. We are all in this together. No one could have predicted what is going on and none of us could have predicted the global shutdown, also, information is changing daily! Maintain kindness when you are talking to people on the phone or when you are sending emails. Remember, it’s not their fault, it’s not your fault, it’s no one’s fault, so be kind to the customer service representatives because they are dealing with thousands of people every day who are in a similar situation.
    Be patient
    You are very likely to have to wait on hold for very long amounts of time when you are calling these companies, you may also not get an immediate response to your emails. Keep in mind that the priority is going to be on customers, flights and travel that’s happening within the next 72 hours. If you are not travelling within 72 hours, you have to be patient and wait a little bit.
    Be flexible
    Right now, we have no clue when international travel is going to resume, we don’t know how long different countries are going to keep their borders closed and unless you have a magical crystal ball, no one can predict it, so be flexible. Once we are all out of this, we can go back to living our best travel lives. I can’t wait to get back out there!

    My experiences

    Let me tell you a bit about my experience during the last few weeks, having to cancel and postpone both personal and business trips. I have received a variety of credits and refunds as a result.

    When I arrived back home on March 10th from Orlando after visiting my sister my Delta app had eight trips and now I’m down to only two, because that’s the reality of what’s been going on.

    For example, that weekend I was going to travel to New York with my nephew to take him to see his first ever Broadway play! He just turned 12, he was going to be travelling to New York by himself and I was so excited, but once Broadway went dark we cancelled our plans.

    I was able to get my sister a refund by calling immediately. She used miles and they didn’t charge a redeposit fee. She was also able to get a 100% refund for the unaccompanied minor fee. For me, I was able to get a waiver for my mileage ticket, because I had an “open ticket”, meaning I had already flown one leg of it. I wasn’t able to get my miles redeposited, but it’s fine because those miles will be available for me to spend for one year.

    My second trip was my return to Detroit after going to New York with my nephew and again I just received a credit, because the flight was not cancelled, I was voluntarily cancelling my travel plans, in the interest of public health, even though I really really wanted to just hang out with my friend in NYC that weekend!

    I also had a business trip coming up to Jordan. I was hosting a trip with my company, Jet Black, with 10 clients and a photographer. It is a trip that I was looking forward to, and I’m still looking forward to it because we are postponing it until the fall!

    I was scheduled to fly AirFrance through Paris, so when Trump announced that they were putting a ban on travel through Europe I immediately called and tried to cancel my ticket and get a refund. But they told me I can only have a credit because the flight was not cancelled. The second time I called because the Kingdom of Jordan announced that they were not allowing any international arrivals anymore. I called on March 16th, the ban went into effect on March 17. I still was not able to get a refund, because the flight had not been cancelled. Third time’s a charm! I called back on March 20th, the ban had been put in place in Jordan and because the flight was cancelled they sent me an email which prompted me to call and I was able to get a 100% refund! Be patient, yet persistent!!!
    Tips for cancelling

    Many airlines are still only offering change fee waivers or credits for future travel, but if refund is your goal, the best thing to do is to wait until you see that the flight has been cancelled and then you should be able to get a refund. Not in all cases, but definitely call your airline to see what you can do about it. Bonus: If you have status with an airline, call the priority line directly to get through quicker. I am Diamond Medallion with Delta and I have not waited more than three minutes anytime that I called in.

    The same thing goes for hotels as well. Many hotels are giving credits, but some are giving full refunds if you can prove that you cannot travel into the country because of various restrictions. The US State Department has put together comprehensive country specific information regarding travel and confirmed cases of COVID-19. If you are calling before your flight is cancelled they are only likely to give you a credit because they do not know that the flight is gonna be cancelled yet. So being patient is definitely key here.

    Hotels.com has also been amazing. In the beginning it was difficult because I booked a non-refundable hotel room, but given the current situation, we called the hotel directly, they told us that they would give us a refund. Now what Hotels.com is doing with all of my other bookings is they are sending me an email saying “do you want to cancel?”. This is great, because at that point I do not need to call them and wait on hold, I can just go on the website, click cancel and I get a 100% refund.

    Here are some links so that you can read how different companies are handling postponements and cancellations.
    Airlines

    Air France

    Alaska Airlines

    American Airlines

    British Airways

    Delta Air Lines

    Emirates

    Frontier

    Hawaiian Airlines

    JetBlue

    KLM

    Lufthansa

    Norwegian

    Qatar Airways

    Ryanair

    Southwest

    Spirit

    Turkish Airlines

    United
    Hotels

    Marriott

    Hotels.com

    Airbnb

    Booking.com

    Expedia
    When can I book another trip?

    Many people are wondering when they will be able to book travel again. Unfortunately, right now we do not know when we will be able to travel. If you see a flight deal and you are really excited about it, you can try booking for several months out and cross your fingers. In the event that we are still not able to travel on your scheduled travel dates, you can have peace of mind knowing that most airlines are not charging change fees for flights booked through the end of March, though many airlines are extending this!! That means if you have to change your flight at a later date they are not going to charge you the $200-300 that it would typically cost to change your flight.

    For those of you who have trips coming up who have to cancel or postpone, I hope this post helps you. Please remember: be kind, be patient and be flexible. We are just postponing travel for now. One day, this will all be over and we’ll all be able to travel again but it is really important that we all globally work together to stop the spread right now. So stay home, let’s all be alone together and practice social distancing!

    What has been your experience with cancelling or postponing travel?

  196. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    Rihanna. Tracee Ellis Ross. Gabrielle Union. What do all of these women have in common? Of course they’re dope. Black women are consistently killing the game. But they’re also a few of our favorite multi-hyphenate darlings who have bossed up in recent years with their own line of products. With such incredible inspiration, it’s hard not to want to start your own business, too — and what a time to do so.

  197. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    According to ProjectDiane2018, a biennial demographic study that snapshots Black women founders, there are over twice as many Black women-led startups as their were three years ago. Still, under 4 percent of them were led by Black women despite them making up 14 percent of the U.S. women’s population. With the latter numbers in mind, the journey can seem daunting, but it doesn’t mean it’s impossible.

  198. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    Unfortunately, the numbers aren’t new or shocking,” Karen Young, founder of Oui the People (fka Oui Shave), shared with Unbothered. “If you look at the data on single-parent households, career gaps, wage gaps, opportunity gaps, Black women are at, or close, to the bottom of the rung.”

    Ultimately, your success depends on your outlook, Young added.

  199. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    “I once took a community finance class, and the woman teaching it said something along the lines of ‘your financial choices today can change your family’s financial options for decades to come,’” she continued. “The data is dismal, but your outlook isn’t. Change the numbers.”

  200. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    We reached out to Young and five other dynamic Black women founders to discuss their entrepreneurship journeys and their top boss lady tips: Trinity Mouzon Wofford, founder of wellness brand Golde and the youngest Black woman to launch a brand at Sephora; Jade Purple Brown, an independent graphic designer; Franci Girard, founder of The Sixes, a clothing brand made for tall women; Brittney Winbush, founder of Alexandra Winbush, one of Issa Rae’s favorite wellness brands; and Dossé-Via, founder of astrology hub Know The Zodiac.

  201. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    How did you know entrepreneurship was right for you?

    Trinity Mouzon Wofford: I’ve known since I was a teenager that I wanted to do something entrepreneurial. I think that bug was always with me. At first I planned on being a physician of integrative medicine and opening up my own practice and having my own line of natural supplements, so I guess you could say I didn’t end up that far off from my original plans!

    Entrepreneurship is not for the faint of heart, and it’s honestly far from the glorious highlight reel that’s often portrayed in today’s media. If the idea of operating your own business excites you more than it terrifies you, it’s probably a fit. That being said, entrepreneurship can come in many forms. It can be the crazy massive startup, but it could also be a side hustle selling handmade crafts that brings you inner fulfillment and a little cash on the side. You get to define what’s right for you.

  202. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    Jade Purple Brown: I’ve always been an extremely independent person, and in every job I’ve ever had, I’ve always felt unfulfilled — mainly because I was never able to fully be myself in corporate environments and express my creativity without any restrictions. I’ve always known that, in order to live a life I loved, I needed to branch out on my own. I think the key is being a strong-minded and independent person that has a clear vision and is willing to go through the ups and downs to make it a reality.

  203. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    Franci Girard: In this Instagram age, it is really easy to feel a lot of FOMO about starting a business because it seems like EVERYBODY is doing it. The truth is entrepreneurship isn’t for everyone. Before you jump in, you have to get real with yourself about whether or not you have an appetite for risk. Most businesses fail and all businesses require an extraordinary amount of energy, time and effort to become successful. It’s important to assess whether or not you can handle that before you start. After thinking that through, you can start focusing on other things like viability of the idea, funding, relationships, etc.

    Brittney Winbush: Like any career, it takes some soul searching to figure out if entrepreneurship is right for you. You have to find that thing that makes you excited to get up in the morning, you have to find your passions, what work can you do that will impact the world around you. If that “thing” is something you need to create, then entrepreneurship is for you. Entrepreneurship is not a hobby. I always knew I wanted to work for myself but it took finding a business I was passionate about to set me on the path of entrepreneurship.

  204. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    What are the first steps one should take when transitioning from their 9 to 5 to working for themselves?

  205. 09.09.2020 · Reply

    Entrepreneurship and travel have a lot in common, they’re both journeys that might start alone but bring personal and professional growth while empowering others.

    Here’s one woman’s story that will make live an inspired life. Jessica Nabongo is a traveler, writer, and entrepreneur who also happens to be the first black woman to have visited every country in the world.

  206. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    TMW: Don’t rush. Unless you’re planning on securing a ton of funding in advance of launching, you can and should keep a “day job” while working on your business. There is literally nothing more paralyzing than not knowing where your rent money is coming from, and that type of stress will impact your ability to make sharp decisions for your business. Don’t feel the pressure to be all in on your brand so early in the process.

  207. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    JPB: The first thing I did was do tons of research on my industry and make sure I understood the risks along with the possibilities of what having my own business could be. This helped me to start putting things in place, so when I finally left my full-time job I had an understanding of what I was getting myself into, and a good structure was already in place. I also started to build a steady list of clients which gave me confidence and a good amount of savings to take the leap.

    FG: Make sure you have a plan. I love seeing entrepreneurs who actually start working on prototypes or proof of concept before they make the full transition. A lot of times, it’s easier to use the relationships and platform you have at your 9-5 to build the foundation for your business. I’m not saying that you should violate any policies dictated by your employer, but think about what you can do in your free time to test your idea before making the jump.

  208. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    KY: I remember googling this very question and what I found was that you should save about 12 months’ worth of expenses. When I transitioned and left my job, Oui was growing so fast I could barely keep up, so I realized the smarter approach would be to track my growth for 6+ months to see if I could afford to pay my living expenses while cutting back on luxuries and non-essential expenses. When the business could support itself and me, I was ready! My advice is to save as much as you possibly can and have at least a year of tracking your business growth before you transition, but nothing ever goes according to plan. There’s that risk-taking again!

  209. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    Becoming an entrepreneur can mean wearing many hats, especially when you’re just starting out. How do you manage your time?

    Dossé-Via: Whewwww, chile. It’s a work in progress. It begins by defining what my priorities are and working intentionally to create a schedule and routine that mirrors that. For the majority of my entrepreneurial journey, I found it challenging to relinquish control and grow a team. I had trust issues (Scorpio problems) and also was a perfectionist about everything (my Virgo Moon, lol). But after the birth of my daughter Nova, I knew it was time to have additional support, and I’m glad I started to grow my team intentionally. It takes a village for my passions to manifest in the way that they do. I’m so grateful for the KTZ and Magic & Melanin team. But it took a while for me to get to this point, so be patient and kind to yourself throughout this journey. It changes day-by-day. I’m an emotionally-driven entrepreneur, so focusing on feeling homeostasis within my soul leads to homeostasis in all realms of life, including entrepreneurship.

  210. BW: In all transparency, this is something I am still working on. With my business being so new, there are opportunities that arrive that I could not have planned for and they often require my immediate attention. Right now, as far as time management goes, instead separating my day into hour blocks I assign certain projects to specific days. This helps me with hard deadlines and giving each thing the attention it deserves.

  211. KY: Time management goes out the window when you’re, as my Jamaican friends would say, “head cook and bottle washer”. The simplest time management skill as an entrepreneur comes down to understanding what’s most important, knowing that it can change by the day or by the hour. This year, I’ve started using the timer on my phone to tackle my day. I set it to the length of time I think the task will take, and during that time I do nothing else.

  212. Come here often?
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    6 Black Women Entrepreneurs Share How to Become Your Own Boss
    STEPHANIE LONG & LILY FULOP
    DECEMBER 9, 2019 8:40 PM

    Rihanna. Tracee Ellis Ross. Gabrielle Union. What do all of these women have in common? Of course they’re dope. Black women are consistently killing the game. But they’re also a few of our favorite multi-hyphenate darlings who have bossed up in recent years with their own line of products. With such incredible inspiration, it’s hard not to want to start your own business, too — and what a time to do so.

    According to ProjectDiane2018, a biennial demographic study that snapshots Black women founders, there are over twice as many Black women-led startups as their were three years ago. Still, under 4 percent of them were led by Black women despite them making up 14 percent of the U.S. women’s population. With the latter numbers in mind, the journey can seem daunting, but it doesn’t mean it’s impossible.

    ADVERTISEMENT
    “Unfortunately, the numbers aren’t new or shocking,” Karen Young, founder of Oui the People (fka Oui Shave), shared with Unbothered. “If you look at the data on single-parent households, career gaps, wage gaps, opportunity gaps, Black women are at, or close, to the bottom of the rung.”

    Ultimately, your success depends on your outlook, Young added.

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    “I once took a community finance class, and the woman teaching it said something along the lines of ‘your financial choices today can change your family’s financial options for decades to come,’” she continued. “The data is dismal, but your outlook isn’t. Change the numbers.”

    We reached out to Young and five other dynamic Black women founders to discuss their entrepreneurship journeys and their top boss lady tips: Trinity Mouzon Wofford, founder of wellness brand Golde and the youngest Black woman to launch a brand at Sephora; Jade Purple Brown, an independent graphic designer; Franci Girard, founder of The Sixes, a clothing brand made for tall women; Brittney Winbush, founder of Alexandra Winbush, one of Issa Rae’s favorite wellness brands; and Dossé-Via, founder of astrology hub Know The Zodiac.

    Thinking of ditching your 9 to 5? These ladies might inspire you to do just that.

    ADVERTISEMENT
    How did you know entrepreneurship was right for you?

    Trinity Mouzon Wofford: I’ve known since I was a teenager that I wanted to do something entrepreneurial. I think that bug was always with me. At first I planned on being a physician of integrative medicine and opening up my own practice and having my own line of natural supplements, so I guess you could say I didn’t end up that far off from my original plans!

    Entrepreneurship is not for the faint of heart, and it’s honestly far from the glorious highlight reel that’s often portrayed in today’s media. If the idea of operating your own business excites you more than it terrifies you, it’s probably a fit. That being said, entrepreneurship can come in many forms. It can be the crazy massive startup, but it could also be a side hustle selling handmade crafts that brings you inner fulfillment and a little cash on the side. You get to define what’s right for you.

    Jade Purple Brown: I’ve always been an extremely independent person, and in every job I’ve ever had, I’ve always felt unfulfilled — mainly because I was never able to fully be myself in corporate environments and express my creativity without any restrictions. I’ve always known that, in order to live a life I loved, I needed to branch out on my own. I think the key is being a strong-minded and independent person that has a clear vision and is willing to go through the ups and downs to make it a reality.

    ADVERTISEMENT
    Franci Girard: In this Instagram age, it is really easy to feel a lot of FOMO about starting a business because it seems like EVERYBODY is doing it. The truth is entrepreneurship isn’t for everyone. Before you jump in, you have to get real with yourself about whether or not you have an appetite for risk. Most businesses fail and all businesses require an extraordinary amount of energy, time and effort to become successful. It’s important to assess whether or not you can handle that before you start. After thinking that through, you can start focusing on other things like viability of the idea, funding, relationships, etc.

    Brittney Winbush: Like any career, it takes some soul searching to figure out if entrepreneurship is right for you. You have to find that thing that makes you excited to get up in the morning, you have to find your passions, what work can you do that will impact the world around you. If that “thing” is something you need to create, then entrepreneurship is for you. Entrepreneurship is not a hobby. I always knew I wanted to work for myself but it took finding a business I was passionate about to set me on the path of entrepreneurship.

    What are the first steps one should take when transitioning from their 9 to 5 to working for themselves?

    TMW: Don’t rush. Unless you’re planning on securing a ton of funding in advance of launching, you can and should keep a “day job” while working on your business. There is literally nothing more paralyzing than not knowing where your rent money is coming from, and that type of stress will impact your ability to make sharp decisions for your business. Don’t feel the pressure to be all in on your brand so early in the process.

    ADVERTISEMENT
    JPB: The first thing I did was do tons of research on my industry and make sure I understood the risks along with the possibilities of what having my own business could be. This helped me to start putting things in place, so when I finally left my full-time job I had an understanding of what I was getting myself into, and a good structure was already in place. I also started to build a steady list of clients which gave me confidence and a good amount of savings to take the leap.

    FG: Make sure you have a plan. I love seeing entrepreneurs who actually start working on prototypes or proof of concept before they make the full transition. A lot of times, it’s easier to use the relationships and platform you have at your 9-5 to build the foundation for your business. I’m not saying that you should violate any policies dictated by your employer, but think about what you can do in your free time to test your idea before making the jump.

    KY: I remember googling this very question and what I found was that you should save about 12 months’ worth of expenses. When I transitioned and left my job, Oui was growing so fast I could barely keep up, so I realized the smarter approach would be to track my growth for 6+ months to see if I could afford to pay my living expenses while cutting back on luxuries and non-essential expenses. When the business could support itself and me, I was ready! My advice is to save as much as you possibly can and have at least a year of tracking your business growth before you transition, but nothing ever goes according to plan. There’s that risk-taking again!

    Becoming an entrepreneur can mean wearing many hats, especially when you’re just starting out. How do you manage your time?

    Dossé-Via: Whewwww, chile. It’s a work in progress. It begins by defining what my priorities are and working intentionally to create a schedule and routine that mirrors that. For the majority of my entrepreneurial journey, I found it challenging to relinquish control and grow a team. I had trust issues (Scorpio problems) and also was a perfectionist about everything (my Virgo Moon, lol). But after the birth of my daughter Nova, I knew it was time to have additional support, and I’m glad I started to grow my team intentionally. It takes a village for my passions to manifest in the way that they do. I’m so grateful for the KTZ and Magic & Melanin team. But it took a while for me to get to this point, so be patient and kind to yourself throughout this journey. It changes day-by-day. I’m an emotionally-driven entrepreneur, so focusing on feeling homeostasis within my soul leads to homeostasis in all realms of life, including entrepreneurship.

    ADVERTISEMENT
    BW: In all transparency, this is something I am still working on. With my business being so new, there are opportunities that arrive that I could not have planned for and they often require my immediate attention. Right now, as far as time management goes, instead separating my day into hour blocks I assign certain projects to specific days. This helps me with hard deadlines and giving each thing the attention it deserves.

    KY: Time management goes out the window when you’re, as my Jamaican friends would say, “head cook and bottle washer”. The simplest time management skill as an entrepreneur comes down to understanding what’s most important, knowing that it can change by the day or by the hour. This year, I’ve started using the timer on my phone to tackle my day. I set it to the length of time I think the task will take, and during that time I do nothing else.

    How do you practice self-care and manage stress while running your business?

    TMW: I take breaks. I try not to subscribe to the narrative that being busy equals being productive. I focus on accomplishing what I actually need to, and then giving myself time to go for a walk, call my mom, read a book, whatever.

    ADVERTISEMENT

    JPB: Waking up early in the morning and getting a good workout in has helped me out immensely. It gives me the opportunity to release stress in a healthy way and take control of my health. I also try my best to set boundaries when it comes to my working hours. In the beginning, I would check email all the time and work on projects during unreasonable hours, but I don’t do that anymore. Now I always remember that If I fall apart, my business will, too, so I always make myself a priority no matter what’s going on.

    KY: I found this year that managing my time isn’t the same as protecting my time, and it has been a big lesson for me. I don’t answer emails after 7pm and try not to work on Saturdays. Time with my friends, my husband, and cooking have been big stress relievers this year. Anything that gets me to be in the moment, rather than in the future or past. Someone once told me ‘the past is regret and the future is anxiety’. As a founder, the future is what we’re literally building every day, so having moments where I’m simply focused on being present has helped me stay grounded and sane.

    What tips do you have for aspiring entrepreneurs who may not be well-versed in money management and finances?

    TMW: Start getting comfortable with your numbers, no excuses. When I was working full-time with a salary, I never had to worry too much about budgeting because my expenses were minimal. I sent about 25% of my paycheck into my savings account and never touched it, and that was all I had to do. When you have a business, unfortunately, things aren’t that simple. Your cash flow is up and down and your costs can become insanely high if you’re not paying attention. If you’re not a numbers person, you have to figure out how to become one, because this is the one thing that your business depends on more than anything else.

  213. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    D: We’re in this together, and most importantly, we don’t have to subscribe to capitalistic standards of money management. There’s a reason why they can be so confusing to understand; they don’t want us to be knowledgeable in it. There are many Black women who are incredible money coaches, though, and we should share our stories and empower each other. We should ask questions, even if we feel imposter syndrome. We should shoot higher rather than lower, and remember that we are the source of humanity, so we are priceless.

    We can study our African ancestors’ ways of managing currency and widen our concept of what currency is, outside of monetary norms. Cowries, for example, are incredible forms of currency, that our West African ancestors used and continue to use today. We can trade our services — you braid my hair, and I read your birth chart. We can pool our money. We can own land collectively, not only individually. Black women are the main influencers of most economies around the world. We are wealth itself. The more we recognize that, the more the world acts accordingly.

  214. Anonymous

    14.09.2020 · Reply

    BW: One thing my dad, who is also an entrepreneur, always taught me was “do what you know and let other people do what they know”. In other words, find people who know money management and finances well and have them on your team. In this process, you will also learn along the way and one thing my mom always says: if you don’t know your money, you know your business. I’m fortunate to have her as the accountant of my business. She’s taught me a lot. We have weekly meetings, we keep spreadsheets, folders, docs together, and while she’s managing the money, I see everything and I’m learning along the way. In entrepreneurship, you have to be open to always being a student. Be ready to learn.

  215. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, In the real world of the market, decisions are always made under conditions of uncertainty. School however, is a system of certainty.

  216. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, The material is preselected, published in textbooks.

  217. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, The teachers know the exercises, the approaches for solving the problems and the solutions themselves.

  218. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, Complex reality is didactically reduced and assigned to particular subjects.

  219. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, Thus the setting of the educational system is at odds with the demands of entrepreneurship.

  220. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, The current educational system is the problem, not the solution.

  221. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, The setting in our educational institutions is counterproductive

  222. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, in the real world decisions are made under conditions of uncertainty, not within a safe and secure framework.

  223. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, You have to search for solutions; they are just waiting to be found.

  224. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, develop an economic future instead of teaching school subjects.

  225. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, Can entrepreneurship be taught by civil servants with lifetime tenure?

  226. Jesica Nabonga story can triggers this vital questions to this headlines “Does our Educational System Teach for Entrepreneurship?

    I want all contestants and campus members to reflect on this and utilize it to examine and refine their idea nor project toward implementation.

    Read this now, Even PISA study does not address the challenges of entrepreneurship.

  227. My co contestants 2020 and campus members did you know that my above educative point in this blog today being funfzhen August is taken from Brains versus Capital boook by Professor Guenter Faltin pages 149 und 150 respectively

    Wie giet’s? und sie?

  228. I must say this, I am over impressed with the way Ephraim Essien is over devoted, committed and focused in this entrepreneurship campus, I gave him distinction and first class in all his performances . In fact he deserves more than this.

  229. Based on all the imperatives points Ephraim gave us today earlier, i think it really alighned and ascribed to Jessica being a notable writer, tourists and maverick.

    Campus members do we all agree?

    If Yes, why can’t we appreciate Ephraim Essien effort and devotion and focuses now just like Mother Teresa deed

  230. Get to Know Jessica Nabongo, the First Documented Black Woman to Travel to Every Country in the World

    After traveling to every country in the world, the fearless Jessica Nabongo opens up about her biggest takeaways, favorite underrated destinations, and what it’s like to be a solo Black female traveler.

    Jessica Nabongo may have been born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, but she makes one thing clear: “The world is our neighborhood.” She told Travel + Leisure, “For me, home is in people. You can find home in many different places, even if it’s your first time visiting.”

    As the first documented Black woman to visit every country in the world, home has meant a cattle camp in South Sudan, a hot air balloon in Myanmar, a barbershop run by a Congolese refugee in Malawi, a yurt in Kyrgyzstan, and yes, even North Korea.
    But a curiosity about the world and the people in it coursed through the Ugandan-American long before her two-and-a-half-year global odyssey began in 2017. “Travel is fundamentally a part of who I am,” said Nabongo, who started traveling internationally at the age of four with her parents to destinations like Jamaica, Mexico, Uganda, London, and Canada. By the time she finished high school, Nabongo had visited eight countries — and she was only getting started.

    The self-proclaimed “geography nerd” spent the following years crisscrossing the map, first quitting her corporate job to teach English in Japan, then studying abroad at the London School of Economics, followed by living in Benin, West Africa, and Rome, while working at the United Nations. All in all, she’s lived in five countries on four continents, and by the time her epic expedition around the world commenced, she already had 60 countries under her belt. Constantly on the move, it’s no wonder, then, that her motto (and moniker for her blog) is The Catch Me If You Can.

    While Nabongo travels with friends and family, she has, of course, done her fair share of solo travel, too. Traversing the world alone has its obvious benefits — the shots are yours to call, the risks yours to take, the misadventures yours to overcome, and the triumphs yours to revel in — but for Nabongo, traveling solo has also been a way to foster a more profound connection with the places she’s visiting. “The benefit of solo travel is that it allows you the opportunity to connect with local people better,” she said. “When we travel with others, we’re there with those people, so oftentimes, we don’t get to know the local people. Solo travel allows you, in many ways, to explore a country deeper in terms of building those relationships and spending more time engaging with locals.”
    Share: Travel-themed Books by Black Authors That Will Fuel Your Desire to See the World
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    And as a solo female Black traveler, specifically, Nabongo sees herself as an ambassador. “I’m Black, I’ve always been Black, I’ll always be Black. I can only move through the world as a Black person…what it means oftentimes, for better or worse, is that you become a representative for the people that people identify you as,” she said. “For the most part, people identify me as African – I’m not often identified as a Black American. It presents an opportunity to give people in different places an experience, and to work to normalize our existence beyond entertainment, beyond what they see on the news. It offers a chance to give people a real-life experience and hopefully help them realize, as I have, that we’re more similar than we are different.”

    In fact, breaking down barriers has been part of Nabongo’s mission well before she even set out on her around-the-world journey. In 2015, she founded Jet Black, a boutique travel firm that works with governments and brands to promote tourism to countries in Africa, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. Upon launching, Nabongo tells us, the company’s first tagline was: “Changing the narrative.”

    “When it comes to Brown and Black countries, we most often see negativity, and that wasn’t my experience,” she said, listing Sudan, Somalia, Afghanistan, and Saudi as places where she had phenomenal experiences. “I remember prior to going to Russia and Saudi and Libya, people were like, ‘You have to be so careful. Russians hate Black people, Saudis hate Africans.’ All these different things, but I had really beautiful experiences in all of those countries.”

    That’s not to say she hasn’t been confronted with challenges. “I got questioned a lot by immigration in different countries because they wouldn’t believe that as a Ugandan passport holder, I’m there for tourism,” said Nabongo, who switches between an American and Ugandan passport, depending on where she’s traveling.

    Nabongo recalls another encounter in a rural part of Kyrgyzstan, when she noticed all of the cars on the road had stopped to stare at her as she was crossing the street to get a SIM card with a local. “I was like, ‘Oh yeah, duh, I’m Black and they’ve probably never seen a Black person here,’” she said. “It’s not to say I forget that I’m Black…but it’s not something I’m constantly thinking about.”

    But those hurdles — sometimes subtle, sometimes jarring — haven’t slowed her down. “I know a lot of Black people ask, ‘Which countries are safe for Black people?’ I don’t really look at travel like that. I don’t ever Google ‘What is it like for Black people in X country because, to me, I belong anywhere that I am,” she said.

    Acknowledging that people have different life experiences that may motivate their actions and apprehensions, Nabongo urges everyone to let go of fear. “I want everyone to feel like the world is there to be explored,” she said. “I want us to move away from fear, whether you’re a woman…or a non-white person. I want people to realize that the world is for all of us to explore.” It’s exactly this school of thought that she’s carried with her country to country, neighborhood to neighborhood.

    And 195 countries later, the fearless traveler notes that most of her favorite experiences have been in lesser-visited, often-overlooked countries, because “the people themselves are way more excited to have tourists, and they’re also wanting to show people their country outside the negative things you see on the news.”

    Among the underrated destinations that stand out most, Nabongo names Sudan, Namibia, northern Norway, Madagascar, and Tonga. “Sudan because they have more pyramids and older pyramids than Egypt. You also have the Red Sea, where you can go diving, and culturally, I find it to be very interesting,” she says. “And Namibia is a great country if you’re looking to do a lot of exploration by road. You have the Desert of Sossusvlei, the Skeleton Coast, you even have safaris.”

    She goes on to talk about whale-watching, snowshoeing, and dog sledding in northern Norway, all the adventure travel opportunities — world-class beaches, rain forests, lemurs, and baobabs — in Madagascar, and even swimming with humpback whales in the wild in Tonga, a South Pacific destination that, according to her, doesn’t get the love it deserves. Talking to Nabongo feels akin to flipping through the pages of a travel magazine: it inspires, it informs, it leaves you feeling like you want to drop everything, pack a bag, and go.

    Much the rest of the world, however, Nabongo’s nomadic lifestyle has been paused amid the coronavirus pandemic. Though it should come as no surprise that she’s still inspiring others from home — she launched a geography course for adults and children in quarantine, providing folks with facts about different countries, and working on proper pronunciation. “So many people were wanting to travel, but also a lot of parents were trying to find new ways to entertain their kids, so it initially started as a class for children, but then so many adults were requesting it, too,” she says of the course, which has now wrapped, though it might make a comeback in the summer.

    But once it’s safe to travel again, where does the woman who has seen it all want to go? Cuba, says Nabongo, without hesitation. “I first visited Cuba in 2016 for my birthday. I went with a bunch of friends, and fell in love with it,” she says. So much so, that in 18 months, she visited four times. “I love the people in Cuba, I love the energy…It’s such an amazing country. Obviously, it has a fascinating history, but the joie de vivre that the people there are living with is just so beautiful to witness and get a little bit of that into your life.”

    This hearkens back to her belief that home lives in people, that everyone is her neighbor, no matter where she happens to be standing in the world.

    Another major takeaway from her travels? “Most people are good. And we are more similar than we are different,” she says.

    “What traveling shows you is no matter if you’re Muslim or Jewish, Black or White, male or female, we’re all just human beings. And in traveling and talking to people in rural areas in less economically developed countries, you really get that sense of ‘Oh, you’re just like me. Sure, we don’t speak the same language, but you’re just like me.’”

    Travel + Leisure’s new podcast, Let’s Go Together, is here! Subscribe to hear Jessica Nabongo and more inspiring voices share their unique travel experiences.

  231. Tourism is a field we should perhaps consider. It is now the largest economic sector worldwide , with stable growth rate that won’t change as quickly as those in other industries .

  232. Growing incomes and highly levels of education are leading to a disproportionately high demand in this area .

  233. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    QUOTE OF JESSICA NABONGO
    * Humanity is the most content, most at peace, most in awe, when
    positioned beside something greater than itself.

  234. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    THE POWERFUL LESSONS JESSICA NABONGO LEARNT FROM VISITING EVERY COUNTRY

    If you could travel to every single country in the world, would you?

    For Jessica Nabongo, the desire to do so came from one single thought; that she had never done anything unique.
    If you’re unfamiliar with Jessica’s story, she’s a Detroit-born Ugandan-American who is on a mission to make the online travel space more inclusive. In addition to sharing her travels online, she’s also the founder of Jet Black, a boutique luxury travel firm, and The Catch, which features physical goods that Jessica acquired during her global adventures.

    Jessica became the first black woman to ever visit every country in the world in 2018 (89 of which she traveled to alone!), and what she learned along the way are some of the most beautiful lessons.
    This conversation inspired me so much, and I had so many questions that Jessica so brilliantly answered. Like, how did it feel as a single woman? And why is it particularly significant that she did it as the first black woman in history? Don’t you worry, we get into ALL of that in today’s episode!

    As you’ll discover in her conversation, Jessica believes in spreading cultural awareness and in helping people to think more positively about other cultures and people you may encounter.

    Her limitless outlook on the world and the wisdom she shares with us is such a gift. If you want to live a more unstoppable, adventurous, and positive life, then this episode is for you.

  235. Meet the adventurer: Jessica Nabongo on the lessons
    learnt from visiting 195 countries In October 2019, travel entrepreneur and photographer Jessica Nabongo became the first documented black woman to visit all 195 UN member states, travelling to 89 countries solo. She talked to us about extreme destinations and new adventures.

  236. Jessica Nabongo talks to us in an interview about new adventures and what it means to be fearless.

  237. Jessica Nabongo talks to us in an interview about new adventures and what it means to be fearless.
    So I’m gonna be shearing it with you.

  238. What inspires your adventures?

    Curiosity — that’s what’s always inspired me. I have a strong desire to see the differences and similarities in how people live everywhere in the world. Even at home in the United States.
    I put a lot of trust in strangers, and I believe you can travel solo anywhere.

  239. Who was the most interesting person you met?
    My guide in Algeria, Zaki. It was towards the end of my journey, and at the time there were a lot of anti-government protests going on there.
    We were supposed to be touring, but we ended up sitting in a café, talking. I’ll never forget what he said: “I’m just living for the sake of living. You can’t have wild ambition around here, especially if you’re the oldest child.” It really struck me. Simply because of where he’d been born, his opportunities were limited to the point where he didn’t even want to think about success.

  240. Do you have any travel heroes?
    Barbara Hillary. She was the first black woman to visit the North and the South Pole, and she did it aged 75 and 79 — isn’t that wild? The other is Cory Lee . He’s in a wheelchair, and has visited 37 countries.
    I can’t relate to him because I haven’t faced those challenges, but I love that he hasn’t let being in a wheelchair stop him from exploring the world.
    I also follow Traveling Black Widow on Instagram. She
    was married for 31 years, but after her partner died, she went on to explore the world. I love her.

  241. She added up by saying:
    When we talk about diversity, people mostly think about racial diversity, but it’s also about abilities, age and body type.
    There are so many different types of diversity, and everybody should be seen.
    I like to see how people are living their lives without boundaries.

  242. Before your career as a traveller, you studied international development and worked with the United Nations. Did this help to prepare you?

    Learning about political and economic history at the London School of Economics absolutely opened my mind and taught me about the world, and the UN was certainly an interesting experience.
    My studies gave me an understanding of post-colonial dynamics and how different countries wield their power. A simple example of how this can apply to travel is the relationship between former colonies and
    air routes.
    The easiest way to get to former French colonies, particularly in Africa, would be by flying through Paris — the French airlines there will have a monopoly because of the diaspora.

  243. What was the most extreme place you visited?
    Let’s talk about South Sudan. The US embassy strongly discourages US citizens from travelling there, and I was advised by a diplomat that it was too dangerous. South Sudan is insecure in terms of its
    government, and, of course, terrible things have happened.
    But I always say no country in the world is completely safe, and no country in the world is completely unsafe. You find what you’re seeking. What I’m seeking is humanity. I’m seeking love. So I went anyway.

  244. I spent my time there with a South Sudanese woman, Nyankuir. I didn’t want to go to a compound and never leave it. Instead, I visited a cattle camp — cattle are an extremely important aspect of Dinka culture. I spent time speaking to the elders and the children, and I found out my bride price — 30 cattle, at most, because at five-foot seven, I’m considered short there.

  245. This is a great adventure, but it doesn’t ends there she continue by saying!

  246. I also think of my trip to the market. There was an old man sitting right in the middle of it. His face was super wrinkled and I found myself just staring at him. I thought he was begging for money, but it
    turned out that his children were grown-up and had left home and he didn’t like being home alone. So he sat in the market every day to interact with people.
    I asked for his picture and he told me to hold on, because he wanted to put his glasses on first.
    So now I have these two portraits: one of how he wanted to be seen, and one of how I wanted to see him.

  247. Both were beautiful and simple experiences. I never felt afraid. It was a reminder that you should take everything you hear from people with a grain of salt.

  248. Now Jessica visiting a cattle camp in South Sudan. Cattle, she discovered, are an extremely important aspect of local Dinka culture.

  249. What travel kit can’t you do without?
    I like mirrorless cameras because they’re lighter — whether they’re Sony or Canon.
    I think the 24-70mm is the perfect lens, in terms of getting that wide range of shots, from landscape images to beautiful portraits, and being able to move with one lens. Obviously, you can take more than one lens, but if you’re travelling for extended periods
    you should take a 24-70mm.
    I also travel with my drone. I have a DJI
    Mavic Air that I find to be lightweight — and inconspicuous when I need it to be.

  250. For more of Jessica Nabongo’s adventures, visit her blog The *Catch Me If You Can*, or follow her on Instagram.

  251. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    Other famous female Enterprenuers include:
    Angela Merkel
    Famous Female Entrepreneurs – Angela Merkel

    Net Worth: $11.5 Million
    Angela Merkel is a German politician and former research scientist. Whilst she may not technically be an entrepreneur, Angela is worth including on this list as she was named as the world’s most powerful woman.

  252. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    Sofia Vergara
    Famous Female Entrepreneurs – Sophia VergaraNet Worth: $37 Million
    As well as being a talented actress and model, having gained many endorsements over the years with companies like Head & Shoulders, Diet Pepsi and Cover Girl, Sofia Vergara is also a successful female entrepreneur.

  253. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    Sofia co-founded Latin World Entertainment, a talent-management and entertainment-marketing firm. Last year she raked in a whopping $37 million through her various endeavors.

  254. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    Arianna Huffington
    The Success Story of Arianna Huffington

    Net Worth: $50 Million
    Arianna Huffington was the founder of The Huffington Post, and even after selling the company to AOL for $315 million, remains a big part in the daily operation of the company

  255. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    Arianna’s also an accomplished author and the principal behind her book Thrive: The Third Metric to Success, is now featured in the header of the website. Arianna Huffington’s estimated net worth is around $50 million.

  256. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    Debbie Fields
    Famous Female Entrepreneurs – Debbi FieldsNet Worth: $65 Million
    In 1977, Debbie Fields founded Mrs. Fields Bakeries, now one of the largest retailers of fresh cookies in the USA.

  257. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    Since founding the business, Debbie has managed to expand it into 11 different countries, with around 650 bakeries in the United States and 80 others in countries around the world

  258. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    Susan Wojcicki
    Famous Female Entrepreneurs – Susan Wojcicki

    Net Worth: $350 Million
    Susan Wojcicki was born in California and studied history and literature at Harvard University. Google was founded by Larry Page and Sergey Brin in Susan’s garage back in 1998, and Susan went on to become Google’s first marketing manager a year later.

  259. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    Since handling Google’s takeover of YouTube, Susan Wojcicki has become the CEO of YouTube.

  260. Indra Nooyi
    Famous Female Entrepreneurs – Indra NooyiNet Worth: $144 Million
    Indra Nooyi was born on the 28th October 1955, and is an American business executive. Indra is currently employed by PepsiCo as the CEO. She originally joined the company in 1994, becoming the CFO in 2001, and then the Chief Executive Officer in 2006.

  261. Last year, Indra was ranked as the 13th most powerful woman in the world according to Forbes. Indra’s salary from PepsiCo is around $28.6 million and her overall net worth is $144 million, making her one of the most famous female entrepreneurs in the world.

  262. Beyonce
    20 Motivational Beyonce Quotes About Life & BeautyNet Worth: $450 Million
    Did you know that Beyonce and Jay-Z’s combined net worth is over billion?

  263. Not bad considering the music industry is both their primary industry and income. Out of that billion dollar net worth, Beyonce’s personal fortune is an estimated $450 million.

  264. But beyond all the awards and recognition Beyonce has received for her music, much of that fortune has come from other ventures including various endorsements, investments and her own clothing line.

  265. It’s safe to say that Beyonce and Jay-Z both have the same “empire state of mind”, and they are among the richest couples in the world.

  266. Anonymous

    15.09.2020 · Reply

    Sheryl Sandberg
    Famous Female Entrepreneurs – Sheryl Sandberg

    Net Worth: $1 Billion
    Sheryl Sandberg is an American technology executive, author and activist, currently the COO of Facebook. She’s also a board member for The Walt Disney Company, Women for Women International, Center for Global Development and V-Day.

  267. This is amazing, for me as an African and an advocate for women, Jessica Nabongo is really changing the narrative and paving the way for not just female entrepreneurs but for everyone. Her daring and bold moves towards living her best life and empowering others in the process is admirable.
    For women, the world is your for the taking, for all believe take action and we shall conquer.

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